I used to work at Disney World and here’s how you can get into the parks before everyone else


AN ex-Disney employee has revealed how to get into the parks ahead of everyone else.

Long queues are inevitable when you go somewhere as popular as the Disney parks, but this tip can help you skip the first queue of the day by getting in early.

An ex-Disney employee has revealed how to get into the parks ahead of everyone else

2

An ex-Disney employee has revealed how to get into the parks ahead of everyone else

Tiktok user Taylor, who uses the handle @tay_johnston, is an ex-Disney employee and big Disney fan.

She advises visitors to arrive at the parks 45 minutes before they are scheduled to open as they often open early.

That way, you’ll be the first people in the parks and won’t have to queue to get on the first ride of the day.

She says to head straight to the most popular rides as they are the ones that have particularly long wait times so are the best to get done early.

She said: “Last week I went to Disney and all four parks opened 45 minutes early.

“Disney regulars call this ‘rope dropping’ – it’s just when you are among the first group of people to walk into a park on any given day.

“It’s worth is for rides that have historically long wait times, like Splash Mountain, Flight of Passage or Slinky Dog Dash.”

The video has racked up nearly 80,000 views, with some people commenting on how they’ve used the tip.

One person commented: “When I was younger we got there so early we got to open the park and ride two rides before it opened.”

Another person wrote: “I was there last week – can’t believe how early they opened the gates.”

And someone else wrote: “Yes! We love to rope drop!!”

Another ex-Disney employee has revealed the things guests should avoid buying at the theme park.

She advises visitors to arrive at the parks 45 minutes before they are scheduled to open

2

She advises visitors to arrive at the parks 45 minutes before they are scheduled to open
Disney fan reveals hidden secret eating area in the parks without the crowds





Source link

business trip

The Impact of the Future of Work on Business Travel


The main stage Thursday morning at the Global Business
Travel Association featured future-of-work strategist Heather McGowan who
turned the structure of work sideways and offered new perspectives on how a culturally,
racially, gender and geo-diverse workforce would redefine the position of their
jobs within the context of their lives. The most immediate evidence of that
future and arguably the most impactful for business travel managers is the vast
scope of the remote workforce and the complexities—and as well as
opportunities—that will come with it.

A panel discussion with corporate travel heavy hitters—BCD
Travel CEO John Snyder, ARC CEO Lauri Reishus and Deem president David
Grace—followed McGowan’s presentation to discuss the implications of several of
her themes for the future of business travel. The panel was moderated by Envoy
founder and CEO Scott Wayne. The following are edited excerpts from that
discussion.

Scott Wayne: Who are your employees today? Where are
they and who are they? How are you measuring them?

Lauri Reishus: They are all over, but mostly at home.
We never closed our offices [but] we have grown our remote workforce in the
U.S. and we have been doing really well from a business resilience perspective.
However, the pandemic hit us in the middle of a five-year transformation
effort… re-platforming of our products and new tech stack. That has created
challenges for us working remotely effectively.

We traditionally were an employer who has three locations
and wanted people to be close to those locations. Now we have opened up our
search across the nation and have found that to be working very well for us. We’re
finding talent that we wouldn’t have attracted if we insisted on that
close-to-physical-plant approach. We are still working on what that looks like
when we do return to the office.

In terms of measurements, they are the same. We have
employees providing operational support, service level agreements—you can easily
see how people contribute to the achievement of those or not. But most employees
are working on product developments and new programs and it’s really about [whether
we] are we hitting milestones. That hasn’t changed. But honestly, we’ve
struggled; we’re working on the digital transformation of our business. [There
has been] a variety of [contributing] factors, but one is our inability to get
together to collaborate. It’s difficult to envision major business process re-engineering
when you can’t get together and draw it out together. It’s proven to us that
being together is really valuable. But it won’t be five days a week, it will be
situational… but we need to get that collaboration going again.

Wayne: And what about maintaining the culture of an
organization? How do you do that in a remote work environment?

John Snyder: Culture drives everything. We are
blessed at BCD to have a positive culture. That was a key concern of mine and
our entire leadership team going into the pandemic. We had to go back to basics.
We built everything on trust and respect; let’s do the same thing.

We went to regular communication to entire global staff. We were
very transparent about what was going on. It wasn’t easy. There was the good,
bad and ugly in those communications. It went out on a weekly basis. It was
received incredibly well. Ten years ago we opened an ‘Ask John’ forum for our
employees to ask me questions or give me advice on how to run the company … and
that’s been fun for me. During the pandemic, the platform [traffic] for Ask
John went up 5,000 percent. Mostly [employees] were thankful we were so open
honest with the communications, but there were some tough messages that I had
to respond to. But [all that activity] gave me a clear indication that we were
hitting home with our employees and keeping the culture strong.

We [also] rejiggered our global intranet. We had a huge
virtual workforce before [the pandemic], but it went overnight to 100 percent. We
realized a big part of our culture was our people being able to interact with
their colleagues on a daily basis. And they no longer had that. So we made our
intranet a digital entry point as a social water cooler. So employees could
come together, share what’s going on with their job, what’s going on at home,
praise each other… that went over very well.

Wayne: As the CEO of Deem, you are focused on
personalization of travel, creating the travel experience. What are the ramifications
of the “Great Reflection” on how we organize our lives with work…what
are the ramifications in terms of business travelers?

David Grace: It’s a massive opportunity. As an
industry we’ve talked for a long time about personalization. And putting the
traveler at the center of what we do. I’m not sure as an industry we’ve done
that well. John and Lauri just talked about… personalizing the work experience in
the office, not in the office, where they work, in their community. That’s driving
all kinds of new traveler needs.

You have to meet the needs of your employees; [they] are the
most important asset we have. Its’ not always what’s the most economical, but
rather, what does that person need to do? You need to offer that personalization
within a context that it fits the program and fits the policy, but [the
employees] don’t even [have to] know it’s there. And it’s not about Covid all
the time. We have to drive for overall safety and personalization for the
workforce. We have to make [travel] easy and … make personalization the center
of that. We have to do this. It’s done in the consumer world, and we have to do
it here as well. A lot of what we’ve done in the corporate travel industry has
been about command and control. What we need to do is delight and enable. If
you can do that, [travelers] will drive more to your policy, drive more your
program and you’ll have greater visibility around duty of care.

Wayne: Let’s talk about volumes and reduced travel
footprint with sustainability and in an era when we digitize everything.

Reishus: I don’t think any of us know what the impact
of work from home will be. But as we look at hiring more remote employees,
don’t we also need to understand if we can afford to fly them in? It might be
once a month, it might be a couple times a year. For overall forecasts… we
expect to see air travel end this year about 30 percent below 2019. And a fairly
modest forecast for the end of 2022, we see it about 20 percent below 2019. But
honestly, this is a forecast in November 2021. It’s a guess based on the best
information we can glean from the industry. Time will tell.

Snyder: Every time I’ve predicted what will happen
the last 18 months, I’ve been wrong. So I’ve retired my crystal ball. But I
think we’ll settle into something 15 to 20 percent below pre-pandemic levels.
But Lauri hit on it… With all our employees virtual and in remote cities all
around the globe, there will be a resurgence of collaboration travel. where
employees who never traveled before are now working [remotely] but they need to
go to an office to collaborate with their customers and their colleagues. That
could potentially make up half the gap that we may lose coming out of the
pandemic. Those remote employees will have to interact with their colleagues.

Wayne: Is sustainability going to stick?

Grace: It always seems to be tied to how the economy is
doing… but it’s different this time. The look/feel/engagement around sustainability
is, for lack of a better term, sustained. But [the travel industry] has to get
to the point where the consumer can digest carbon emissions information and [we]
also need to give that reporting to the corporate so they can make decisions about
how engaged they’re going to be. Because a lot of that will be working with
their suppliers to help them manage it. [Deem has] to work together to give
visibility as a technology platform, but we don’t have control over the airplane
or car or hotel does as far as their [carbon] footprint. But [the booking
platform] can give that visibility and help travelers make the right decision.
And the bigger question is what premium is that company willing to buy or pay
for to make that right decision. And every company will be different on that.  

Snyder: [Sustainability] is here to stay. We ran a
survey having travel buyers rank what is most important to them coming out of
the pandemic. In the pandemic, duty of care shot to number one. Now, we are
seeing sustainability ramp up aggressively. In the past year, we haven’t seen a
single request for proposal that didn’t have a sustainability checklist. I
applaud people for doing that. … But we need to take it beyond the checklist.
We need to sit down as partners—the TMC the buyer and any other suppliers that need
to be a part of that—but use your TMC as a helping board to build your program,
set rules and help you drive and track those goals. We’re at a point where we
need to get beyond the checklist and put formal plans in place. I realize
there’s investment in that—some companies are ready, some aren’t.



Source link

Covid-19: When Aucklanders can travel and how it will work


Aucklanders who are fully vaccinated or have a negative Covid-19 test will be able to cross the border from December 15, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has announced.

People outside of Auckland will also be able to travel into the region, with the same vaccine or test requirement when they depart.

The requirements only apply to those aged 12 and older. Children under 12 who are not yet eligible for vaccination will not be required to get a test.

Travel in and out of Auckland can resume on December 15.

David White/Stuff

Travel in and out of Auckland can resume on December 15.

The requirements will remain in place until January 17, by which time it is hoped that vaccination rates around the country will be high enough that measures at the Auckland border will no longer be necessary.

READ MORE:
* Covid vaccine pass: Your questions answered and all the key details you need to know
* Covid-19 NZ: Vaccine passes launched, will be needed for ‘extra freedoms’ over summer
* Covid-19: What you need to know about flying domestically this summer

“Aucklanders can now book summer travel and accommodation with confidence and businesses inside Auckland and around the rest of the country can plan for summer travellers,” Ardern said.

The requirements for those travelling by road will be enforced by police.

While the possibility of having checkpoints at the land border had earlier been floated, along with allocating Aucklanders “time slots” to travel, the Government has decided random spot checks will be sufficient.

Those caught breaking the rules would face a $1000 fine.

At the northern boundary used to enter Northland, police would be working with iwi to ensure confidence in checks.

Those leaving Auckland will either need to be fully vaccinated or provide a negative Covid-19 test.

BROOK SABIN/Stuff

Those leaving Auckland will either need to be fully vaccinated or provide a negative Covid-19 test.

For those travelling by air, checks would be done at check-in at Auckland Airport. Air New Zealand has already announced that proof of vaccination or a negative test result will be required to travel domestically, also starting from December 15.

Proof of vaccination or a negative test result would also be required to travel on interisland ferries, Ardern announced on Wednesday. This would mean all entry points to the South Island would be covered by checks.

Vaccine certificates, which people will use to prove they have received both doses of the vaccine, became available on the My Covid Record website on Wednesday morning.

Those who instead required a negative test to travel would need to take one within 72 hours of departure.

Got a summer travel question? Email travel@stuff.co.nz, with ‘Ask An Expert’ in the subject line, and we’ll ask the experts for you.



Source link

Latest dollar exchange rate and how tipping, contactless payments and credit cards work


From figuring out how much to tip to paying for almost everything in cash, travelling in the US can be a minefield of money questions.

If you want to avoid blowing too many bucks on card fees and poor exchange rates it can pay to do your research before you travel.

A lot has changed in the 20 months since UK visitors were last spending dollar bills stateside, so read on to make cents of what’s new.

How’s the exchange rate right now?

Unfortunately for holidaymakers, news of the US opening to tourists from the UK and Europe had the effect of boosting the value of the dollar against the pound.

You’ll spend 2p more for every dollar you buy now than on 28 October. The rate as of Monday 15 November was 74 pence to the dollar.

Contactless payments

In the 400-plus days that British tourists have been away, the US has slowly caught up with the rest of the developed world when it comes to contactless payments.

Originally slow to the wireless payments game, Apple Pay and Google Pay helped accelerate the uptake of contactless payments stateside.

The best change in the past 20 months? You can finally use Apple or Google Pay on the entire New York Subway and bus system – just like the London Underground and other local transport networks back home.

Bank credit cards

There are lots of bank credit cards on the market that work for travelling with, but Halifax’s Clarity Credit Card regularly tops expert charts.

Anecdotally, the Mastercard is favoured by some of the world’s most frequent and frugal travellers. I took a quick poll of travel writers on a recent trip to New York, and it was the most popular card by far.

You don’t pay any charges on transactions or to take money out of ATMs while overseas and the currency rate is pegged to Mastercard’s official rate.

Digital bank cards

Digital banks are more popular than ever, with many customers choosing to leave brick and mortar banks in favour of online-only brands like Revolut, Starling and Monzo.

Currensea is a great pick for travel. The UK’s first direct debit travel card, it offers a great exchange – you’ll pay no more than 0.5 on the FX travel rate. Simply link it to your current account by direct debit and it takes the money out of your main account after you’ve spent it, providing an extra level of security and peace of mind while travelling. A Mastercard, this plastic is contactless, and chip and pin.

Tipping and cash

In big cities in the US, tipping in bars and restaurants is now expected at 20 per cent, according to every local I asked while reporting from New York last week.

Evelyn Jack, 35, a bartender at Pendry Manhattan West in Manhattan admits what many of us suspect – that service industry workers sometimes give locals preferential service because they know they’ll tip at the local standard rate of 20 per cent.

She said: “It’s not just Europeans who think that 15 per cent is what they should be tipping, some tourists from the Midwest don’t think to pay 20 per cent when they visit New York. The cost of living in the city is so high, wait staff really rely on people paying tips at that higher rate to survive.”

Ms Jack also says that even if you think your main server has not been up to scratch, it is important to tip anyway, as the money is usually split among the entire front-of-house team.

And on the question of cash or card, she says that servers prefer it if you can pay your tips in cash, as in some bars this can mean they will avoid paying tax on the cash.

Currency exchange shops

The golden rule here is to never exchange your money at the airport, where the rates are always poor.

An investigation by FairFX found that Travelex currency exchange desks at Heathrow Airport are offering rates that are 17 per cent less than the market rate, meaning you could lose out on £211 for every £1,000 exchanged.

A safe alternative is always the Post Office who will give you a much fairer rate.



Source link

Tip: Can An H-1B Employee Work From Home? – Immigration



United States:

Tip: Can An H-1B Employee Work From Home?


To print this article, all you need is to be registered or login on Mondaq.com.

Whether an H-1B employee can work from home depends on factors
including the geographic area of employment. Employers will need to
determine, on a case-by-case basis, whether to file an amended
petition or take other action such as posting the original LCA at
the new worksite location.

When You Must File an Amended Petition

You must file an amended H-1B petition if your H-1B employee
changed or is going to change his or her place of employment to
a worksite location outside of the metropolitan statistical
area (MSA)
covered by the existing approved H-1B petition,
even if a new LCA is posted at the new location.

Note: Once you file the amended
petition, your H-1B employee can immediately begin to work at the
new location. You do not have to wait for a final decision on the
amended petition for your H-1B employee to start work at the new
location.

When You Do NOT Need to File an Amended Petition

A move within an MSA: If your H-1B employee is
moving to a new job location within the same MSA or area of
intended employment
a new LCA is not required. Therefore,
you do not need to file an amended H-1B petition. However, you must
still post the original LCA in the new work location within the
same MSA or area of intended employment. For example, an H-1B
employee moving to a new job location within the New York City MSA
(NYC) would not trigger the need for a new LCA, but you would still
need to post the previously obtained LCA at the new work location.
This is required regardless of whether an entire office moved from
one location to another within NYC or if just one H-1B employee
moves from one client site to another within NYC.

Short term placement: Under certain
circumstances, you may place an H-1B employee at a new job location
for up to 30 days, and in some cases 60 days (where the employee is
still based at the original location), without obtaining a new LCA.
See 20 CFR 655.735. In these situations, you do not need to file an
amended H-1B petition. Under the short-term placement provisions,
an employer may place the H-1B worker at the new worksite location
for up to 30 workdays in one year and, in certain circumstances, up
to 60 workdays in one year. Employers will need to determine, on a
case-by-case basis, whether the 30-workday and/or 60-workday
provisions may apply. Employers should be aware that, if the
worker’s place of residence is outside the area of intended
employment, the 60-workday provision would not apply. The
short-term placement provisions only apply to H-1B workers; not
H-1B1 or E-3 workers.

Non-worksite locations: If your H-1B employee
is only going to a non-worksite location, you do not need to file
an amended H-1B petition. A location is considered to be
“non-worksite” if:

  • The H-1B employees are going to a location to participate in
    employee developmental activity, such as management conferences and
    staff seminars;

  • The H-1B employees spend little time at any one location;
    or

  • The job is “peripatetic in nature,” such as
    situations where their primary job is at one location but they
    occasionally travel for short periods to other locations “on a
    casual, short-term basis, which can be recurring but not excessive
    (i.e., not exceeding five consecutive workdays for any one visit by
    a peripatetic worker, or 10 consecutive workdays for any one visit
    by a worker who spends most work time at one location and travels
    occasionally to other locations).” See 20 CFR
    655.715.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general
guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought
about your specific circumstances.

POPULAR ARTICLES ON: Immigration from United States

2023 Diversity Visa Lottery Registration

Cozen O’Connor

The U.S. Department of State (DOS) Bureau of Consular Affairs announced that the online registration period for the 2023 Diversity Immigrant Visa Program…

What Is Visa Retrogression?

Envoy Global, Inc.

As noted in our November 2021 Visa Bulletin post, significant retrogression related to the EB-3 category occurred.



Source link

Moroccans protest vaccine pass required for work, travel


RABAT, Morocco (AP) — Protests erupted across cities in Morocco on Sunday against a coronavirus vaccine passport that is required to access indoor activities and travel.

Proof of vaccination has been mandatory since Oct. 21 for all Moroccans to enter their place of work and restaurants and for domestic and international air travel.

The North African kingdom’s vaccination rate is the highest in the continent, with more than 58% of its 36 million people fully inoculated.

But a vocal minority is opposed to the abrupt decision to require the vaccine pass, and hundreds of demonstrators marched in the capital of Rabat for the the second time in a week to voice opposition to the rule.

“It should be our choice!” angry anti-pass protesters shouted just a stone’s throw from the parliament building.

Some demonstrators attempted to break through a police cordon, and officers responded by using shields to disperse the crowd. Images from the protest showed police arresting some protesters. Others suffered injuries.

Several hundred people also joined a similar protest in Casablanca, the country’s economic hub. Demonstrators in other cities such as Tangiers in the north and Agadir in the south held similar protests.

While Morocco’s vaccine passport is required in an unusually large number of places, similar passes are used in many countries and have boosted vaccination rates. Morocco has reported at least 14,000 deaths related to COVID-19.



Source link

Moroccans protest vaccine pass required for work, travel


RABAT, Morocco (AP) — Demonstrations have been staged in cities across Morocco against a coronavirus vaccine passport required to access indoor activities and travel. Proof of vaccination has been mandatory since Oct. 21 for all Moroccans to enter their place of work and restaurants and for domestic and international air travel. The North African kingdom’s vaccination rate is the highest in the continent, with more than 58% of its 36 million people fully inoculated. But a vocal minority is opposed. Protests were held Sunday in the capital of Rabat, Casablanca, Tangiers in the north and Agadir in the south. 



Source link

Moroccans protest vaccine pass required for work, travel


Updated 7 minutes ago

RABAT, Morocco (AP) — Protests erupted across cities in Morocco on Sunday against a coronavirus vaccine passport that is required to access indoor activities and travel.

Proof of vaccination has been mandatory since Oct. 21 for all Moroccans to enter their place of work and restaurants and for domestic and international air travel.

The North African kingdom’s vaccination rate is the highest in the continent, with more than 58% of its 36 million people fully inoculated.

But a vocal minority is opposed to the abrupt decision to require the vaccine pass, and hundreds of demonstrators marched in the capital of Rabat for the the second time in a week to voice opposition to the rule.

“It should be our choice!” angry anti-pass protesters shouted just a stone’s throw from the parliament building.

Some demonstrators attempted to break through a police cordon, and officers responded by using shields to disperse the crowd. Images from the protest showed police arresting some protesters. Others suffered injuries.

Several hundred people also joined a similar protest in Casablanca, the country’s economic hub. Demonstrators in other cities such as Tangiers in the north and Agadir in the south held similar protests.

While Morocco’s vaccine passport is required in an unusually large number of places, similar passes are used in many countries and have boosted vaccination rates. Morocco has reported at least 14,000 deaths related to COVID-19.





Source link

Indonesia, Malaysia to Start Work on Travel Corridor | World News


JAKARTA (Reuters) – Indonesia and Malaysia will start a travel corridor between the two nations and finalise maritime borders in accordance with international law, Indonesia’s foreign minister said on Monday after a meeting with her Malaysian counterpart.

Retno Marsudi also said Southeast Asian countries would continue to offer Myanmar humanitarian help, despite the lack of cooperation by its ruling military in committing to a peace roadmap.

(Reporting by Kate Lamb in Sydney and Augustinus Beo Da Costa in Jakarta; Editing by Martin Petty)

Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters.



Source link

Travel Tip: Travel Agents and How to Successfully Work With One


For those of you who think the days of the travel agent are gone, you might want to think again. New research by AAA confirms what many of us already knew — travel agents are here to stay.

In fact, the study shows that 27 million of us are planning to use a travel agent within the next year. The reason most often cited is the value travel agents offer when things go wrong — flight delays, hotel cancellations, weather, etc.

Surprisingly, the study also found that younger travelers are using travel agents and millennials are just as likely as baby boomers to use a travel agent.

The key to successfully using a travel agent is specialization. Don’t just use one travel agent. Use the ones that specialize in where you want to go or what you want to do when you get there.

Photo Credit: Basher Eyre





Source link