Travel rules for flying in the UK: How to stay safe from coronavirus in the air and at the airport


After almost two years of restrictions and what seems like a never-ending lockdown, things are finally starting to look up.

The thought of packing a suitcase and travelling to the airport to catch some sun is one which I’m sure we all crave. However if you’re jetting off this year, being surrounded by strangers in a confined space for hours might seem like a scary idea.

Coming into contact with shared facilities, such as the toilets, could mean you risk catching and spreading the virus through touching a contaminated surface, but in a bid to reassure worried passengers, airlines have introduced safety protocols to ensure the risk of contracting covid remains a low risk.

Some of these protocols include social distancing, reducing food and drink services and ensuring face coverings are worn on board. In addition to these, some airports have also implemented touch-free check in and body temperature cameras.

To help, we’ve gathered the best tips from ‘Which?’ to ensure you can relax whilst going on holiday.



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Choose an airline whose coronavirus protocols you trust

Seating

Health and safety protocols will vary depending on which airline you fly with.

‘Which?’ reports that Ryanair won’t automatically seat you with your household, unless you pay for pre-selected seats. This is despite EU Covid-19 guidance calling on airlines to limit passengers’ contact with strangers and modify the seat allocation process accordingly.

Ryanair denied any suggestion that it has intentionally split up groups travelling together, stating that its seating policy ‘remains unchanged’ during the pandemic.

So if you are able to select a seat, it’s said that you should choose one by the window as it attracts less germs than the aisle seat, which people touch as they walk past or when getting in and out of their seat row.

Luggage

The government is advising passengers to check as much luggage into the hold as possible in order to limit movement within the cabin. Ryanair, however, is encouraging customers to bring carry-on bags.

A spokesperson for Ryanair said hold luggage would ‘significantly increase the risk of COVID-19 ’ as it has to pass through eight different sets of hands, from check-in to the boarding gate.

Before booking, please check your airlines rules before you book.

Take your own cleaning products

It’s been reported that Ryanair are relying on just one clean per day as the chemicals they use are said to provide 24 hours of protection.

However virologist at University College London, Greg Towers, says: “More cleaning equals less risk. I don’t know what cleaning Ryanair is doing, but I doubt there’s a way of preventing the virus getting on door handles or killing it with some previous cleaning protocol”.

Due to situations such as this, Dr Wilson-Howarth advises carrying alcohol wipes to clean the tray table and high-risk areas including the toilet door handle.

And just in case the hand sanitiser dispensers aren’t contactless, it’s also best to bring your own.

Temperature checks

While some airports are trialling body temperature cameras to screen people as they move through the airport, the EASA has warned there’s little evidence of their effectiveness.

According to the Office for National Statistics, up to 80% of people who test positive for coronavirus don’t display symptoms meaning their temperature may read as normal despite having the virus.

For the 20% that aren’t asymptomatic, it can take between four and seven days to develop a fever after exposure. Therefore, these trials are reportedly no longer continuing.

Still, there’s no harm in checking your own temperature just in case you do have a fever as if you do, you may be denied boarding. ‘Which?’ recommend taking out comprehensive travel insurance to protect against this scenario.

Switch on the overhead fan

Airlines’ hospital-grade high-efficiency particulate air filtration systems (HEPA) on planes is said to remove 99.9% of impurities, including bacteria and viruses, renewing cabin air every two to three minutes.

Professor Sally Bloomfield, at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, suggests switching on the overhead fan as it can enables you to breathe air directly from above rather than that of the people seated around you, thus reducing the risk of catching the airborne virus.

Travel at quieter times – if possible

If you’re flexible, it’s best to fly at the quieter times as there will obviously be less people and therefore a lower risk.

Flights are normally at their quietest on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Other options are to travel very early in the morning or late at night when flights are often not so full.

Wear a mask over your nose and mouth – and bring spares

Those with certain medical conditions are exempt as well as children though the cut-off age varies by airline.

When you bring your own covering, bear in mind that European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control advises that medical masks should be worn when a minimum distance of 1.5 metres from others can’t be guaranteed.

According to WHO, you should not use the mask when it becomes damp, nor should you reuse it.

Throw it away immediately when you remove it to eat or drink and replace with a fresh one afterwards. Additionally, make sure they cover the face from the bridge of the nose to the chin.

A mask which does not fit correctly can result in the person constantly touching their mask and face to fix it – potentially leading to an increase in transmission.

Important

Please check whether the country you’re flying to requires a certain type of mask for entry as its being reported that passengers are being denied boarding for not having the correct face mask.

Travelers entering Italy, for example, are required to wear a surgical or FFP2 mask. This information can be hard to find online so before flying, check with your airline or pack several different types of mask, including a surgical or FFP2 mask, so that you’re covered.

Avoid touching everything

According to The New England Journal of Medicine, coronavirus can live on stainless steel and plastic surfaces for up to 72 hours.

Measures are already in place to make airports as touch-free as possible with passengers being asked to self-scan passports and use ‘bag drop’ and eGate facilities to keep contact to a minimum.

To keep the new system as stress-free as possible, it may be worth downloading the airline app before you travel as it means you can check in online and download your boarding pass to your phone.

A great tip is also to download newspapers, books and magazines to read rather than buying them in airport shops and bring your own empty refillable water bottle which you can fill it up once you’ve past security.

GP and travel health writer, Dr Jane Wilson-Howarth, warns that airport ATMs are likely to be a ‘highly contaminated’ surface and recommends that you bring enough cash for your journey and use contactless payment where possible.

What are the high-risk contamination zones at the airport?

  • ATM Machine
  • Passport check-in desk
  • Shop payment terminal
  • Children’s play area
  • Staircase rails
  • Security check tray area





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Tips on keeping kids safe from burns


Years ago, while enjoying a family campfire outdoors, one of my sons inadvertently flung a burning marshmallow from the end of his roasting stick. Fortunately, no one was hit — it struck a tree and flamed out. While disaster was averted, it was a potent reminder of how mindful we need to be around fire.

The burn unit at The Hospital for Sick Children is among its busiest emergency services. What’s more, pediatric nurse practitioner Charis Kelly says that since the pandemic the number of patients seen at the burn unit has doubled. Here, she shares tips on how to keep your children safe from burns. The good news? There are steps parents can take to prevent tragedy.

What are some of the most common injuries you see at the burn unit?

About 70 per cent of the burns we treat are scalds from hot liquids. We see scald burns from toppled cups of tea or coffee, or from soup spilled onto a child’s lap. Another common cause is when kids are in the bathtub and they accidentally knock the hot water tap. So, it’s really important not only to never leave your child unattended, but also to check your hot water tank at home, and make sure it’s set no higher than 150 degrees F.

The second most common are contact burns. These are typically from a glass-fronted fireplace or a campfire. The glass front of a gas fireplace can get up to 400 degrees F. If a young child learning to walk, for example, puts his hands on the glass front, he can sustain third-degree burns within two seconds.

In warmer weather, we see children who have fallen into campfires, or kids who have accidentally walked on hot coals that haven’t been extinguished properly.

If my child suffers a burn, what’s the first thing I should do?

Even before you call for help, you want to stop the burning process. That means removing any hot, wet clothes, and applying cool water for 20 minutes. This will really affect the outcome.

A lot of people worry if they remove any clothing, they’re going to tear the skin with it. But if that were to happen, it means the skin was not viable and would blister off anyway. By keeping hot clothes against the skin, you’re actually allowing that heat to continue to travel into the skin and burn deeper.

How do I know if a burn is serious enough to take my child to the doctor?

One of the biggest factors is pain. If your child is in pain, bring him to your health-care provider or the hospital to be assessed. He’ll need good pain management and proper wound care to prevent infection. The quicker you can heal a burn, the less chance there is for scarring.

You’ll also want to seek medical attention for any burn to the face, the genitals, the hands or feet — these are difficult areas to treat and require expert advice. Also, bring in a child with a burn bigger than the palm of your hand; a burn of this size is significant on a child.

What are some burn prevention tips for parents?

We have a saying: eight feet from the heat. So, when you’re cooking, for example, don’t have kids running around when you’re about to open the oven door or strain pasta in the sink. Also, pot handles should always be turned in, and use the back elements of the stove when possible.

Keep all hot beverages in travel mugs. If you’re pushing your child in a stroller, or you’re breastfeeding, make sure hot beverages have a lid on them. And when serving soup or hot chocolate, just make sure it’s at an appropriate temperature.

That eight-feet rule applies to campfires too. Outline a campfire with a safety circle and make sure kids know where they’re allowed to go.

How to identify what kind of burn your child has sustained

First-degree burn

Appearance: A sunburn is a good example of a first-degree burn. You’ll see sensitive, red skin, that can be itchy and can peel.

Treatment: A cool compress applied to the skin; no ointments or creams. First-degree burns usually take a week to fully resolve.

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Second-degree burn

Appearance: A second-degree burn is one that has gone through the epidermis – the top layer of the skin – and the skin blisters off. You’ll usually see a pink open wound with fluid coming from it.

Treatment: After you’ve cooled the burn with water, cover the wound with a clean cloth and take you child to your health-care provider or emergency.

Third-degree burn

Appearance: These are full-thickness burns that have gone through two layers of skin – the epidermis and the dermis. These burns can be white, brown or yellow, and are usually leathery and tough.

Treatment: Once you’ve cooled the burn with water, call 911. These burns typically need surgery.

PRO TIP: Burn-treatment myths

The burn unit at SickKids has seen too many harmful home remedies as burn first-aid. Use Charis Kelly’s cool-water-only rule, and do not apply any of the following:

• Butter

• Toothpaste

• A cut potato

• Ice

• Flour

Every two weeks, Healthy Kids will feature questions about childhood health issues answered by professionals from SickKids. Email your questions about nutrition, common ailments, mental health or growth and development to healthykids.to@gmail.com. We will try to feature as many questions as possible. Always consult your family health-care provider with specific health concerns. Torstar, the Star’s parent company, is in a fundraising and educational partnership with SickKids to help raise $1.5 billion for new facilities.





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CheapOair Shares Safe Air Travel Tips | State


NEW YORK, May 5, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — The latest numbers from the TSA show passenger counts more than 1 million per day every day since March 9th of this year.  This is good news for the travel industry, and the traveling public.  But while consumers are increasingly ready for the excitement of travel to come back into their lives, heightened awareness of  hygiene-related safety protocols should remain top of mind.

Airlines and airports worldwide have instituted protocols and requirements to help keep the flying public safe.

Airlines and airports worldwide have instituted protocols and requirements to help keep the flying public safe. To aid in continued safety vigilance, CheapOair is sharing their top tips for strategies to reduce the risk of infection while flying.

Tip No. 1:  Book to fly when it is the least crowded.  Flights leaving between 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m. often have smaller passenger numbers.  Earlier flights can be filled with deal seekers, and airports are traditionally the busiest between 10:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.  Further reduce exposure to large crowds by flying on Tuesdays or Wednesdays, traditionally the slowest days of the week for air travel.

Tip No. 2:  Do not fly if you might be sick.  Your immune system is weaker when you are sick, so if you are feeling under the weather, put off travel to another day.

Tip No. 3:  Use Contactless Check-In at the airport, and everywhere else.  Check in for your flight before you arrive at the airport, then use self-check to drop off your bags.  Download your boarding pass to your phone and sign up for text alerts to notify you of gate or schedule changes from your travel provider.

Click on the link above to read CheapOair’s full  list of air travel safety and hygiene recommendations.

“It’s important for the public to understand that travel can be worry free where hygiene is concerned, as long as proper precautions are maintained.  We all know the value of wearing a mask and maintaining social distance.  Once you are at the airport, or on a plane, these simple practices can help you and your family enjoy their vacation with much less stress,” said Werner Kunz-Cho, CEO of Fareportal, the company behind online travel agencies CheapOair and One Travel.

Please note: With COVID-19 still prevalent, be sure to check local travel regulations and notices for any restrictions, rules, and safety guidelines that may be in place. For additional information please visit the CDC website for up-to-date health and wellness information. 

About CheapOair

CheapOair is an online travel agency that specializes in providing cheap flights and great last-minute flight deals for travelers worldwide. Consumers can book online, on mobile apps for iOS and Android, by phone, or live chat. Part of Fareportal’s family of travel brands, CheapOair bridges the gap between an online travel agency and a traditional agency with travel agents available 7 days a week to help find great prices on flight tickets to global destinations on over 600 airlines, a million hotels, and 100s of car rental companies. Follow CheapOair on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for travel inspiration and helpful travel tips.

Cision View original content to download multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/cheapoair-shares-safe-air-travel-tips-301285058.html

SOURCE CheapOair





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Plan, Be Flexible, Travel Safe



Highlights:

  • Be smart. Only travel lif it makes sense for your situation. 
  • Domestic may be safer than international. 

  • Driving may be safer than flying. 
  • Get fully vaccinated.


June 11, 2021 — In normal times, summer travel is all about unwinding, spending time outdoors, and putting most cares aside, at least temporarily. Through the lens of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, carefree summer travel looks more challenging.

Consider the safest way to get to your destination, what health precautions remain necessary, and what the COVID-19 case numbers look like at your destination, experts advise.



“If you are a traveler with a higher risk tolerance and you are flexible, it may be a good time to start planning that trip,” Henry Wu, MD, director of the Emory TravelWell Center and associate professor at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, said during a media briefing on Thursday.

Instead of international travel, sticking closer to home through local or domestic travel might be a better idea for families with unvaccinated children or for people who like more predictability when they travel, Wu said.

For people with health conditions that increase risk for more severe COVID-19 or for whom the vaccines might be less effective, “it still might not be a good time to travel,” he said.


Go here to learn more about how to travel safely


Pack the Travel Guide — and the Travel Guidance

So where to? The CDC’s Travelers’ Health website is the best place to start, Wu said. “The number of countries that are coming off the highest level [travel warning] is increasing.”

Countries in the midst of serious surges are not good choices, Wu said. “Even if you are vaccinated, should you need health care during your trip, whether from a car accident or a heart attack you become a burden to a struggling health system.”

Summer travel plans also start with vaccination, Wu said. “I really strongly advise everyone to get vaccinated when it’s available to you.” Also, remember to pack your CDC-issued vaccination card and make copies, including one that can be stored on the internet as a backup.


Although the CDC suggested that vaccinated people can do most activities without a mask, “I suggest travelers take a more nuanced and informed approach,” Wu said. When you are in situations that are a higher risk for COVID-19 transmission — say a crowded indoor space with a mix of people — I would advise wearing masks, even if not required.”

As a reminder, most countries still require COVID-19 testing prior to travel, even for the vaccinated. Also, “remember that you still need a negative test within 3 days of boarding a plane on your return to the U.S., Wu said.

“So that mask might save you a big headache.”


Variants of Concern and Single Dose Protection

More and more data suggest the COVID-19 vaccines offer protection against variants of concern, including the delta variant, first identified in India, Wu added.

“Our vaccines are effective in that they can prevent severe illness and probably most infections from the delta variant,” Wu said. Furthermore, when there are “breakthrough” infections — cases where vaccinated people still become infected — most cases are mild.

“I can’t say that all the data is there and there’s 100% certainty,” Wu said, especially if a new variant of concern emerges. He recommends always taking extra precautions, “whether it’s masking up in high-risk situations or maybe avoiding countries with high levels of transmission.”


‘Get That 2nd Dose’

The situation is obviously riskier for the unvaccinated, but what about those people who are in between their first and second doses or those who — for whatever reason — only received the first of a recommended two-dose vaccine?

Anthony Fauci, MD, chief medical advisor to the Biden administration, cited a study preprint that has not yet been peer reviewed that said the Pfizer vaccine is 88% effective against the delta variant with two doses. However, this effectiveness drops to 33% with one dose. The study only looked at the Pfizer vaccine and not the two-dose Moderna shot or the one-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine. 

Similarly, the 60% effectiveness of two doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine also drops to 33% with only a single dose.

“My quick the quick advice is to get that second dose, even if it’s late,” Wu said. “It’s certainly something I would do before your trip.”

Unless there is a medical reason or an allergy that precludes a second dose, “why settle for partial benefit when you can get the full benefit with that second dose?” Wu asked. “I certainly would get it.”


It’s About the Journey and the Destination

In general, road trips might be the safest form of summer travel because they allow full control over your surroundings en route. It is still essential to avoid crowded spaces when you stop along the way, Wu said.

Others will still opt for air travel. Airports and airlines still require passengers to wear masks, including those who have been vaccinated. The CDC has mandated masks on all forms of public transportation, which includes trains, buses, ride-shares, and more.

Try to minimize how often you remove a mask “if you want to be extra safe. Even if you’re vaccinated, I always like to take those extra precautions.”


Cruise Control

The CDC continues to enforce a No Sail Order for cruise ships that operate in U.S. waters, first issued March 14, 2020. The agency continues to cite the risk for introduction, transmission, and spreading of COVID-19.

Cruises are “very interesting,” Wu said. Certain cruise lines have mandatory vaccine requirements for all passengers as well as crew.”Some have relaxed [the criteria], some have backtracked a little bit, but others have a very clear requirement,” he added. “Certainly travelers should take note of that before booking any cruises.”

CDC press officer Scott Pauley said in an email, “We currently recommend that all people avoid travel on cruise ships, including river cruises, worldwide. As for future cruises, they should continue to monitor our guidance for any updates,”

And recently, two Americans aboard a Celebrity Cruise Line cruise from St. Maarten tested positive for COVID this week, CNN reported.


International Plans

The CDC recently downgraded its warning levels for more than 100 countries. The move comes after the agency changed its criteria for travel advisories. For example, the highest warning, level 4, now requires 500 cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 residents, up from 100 cases per 100,000.

Not surprisingly, one country not downgraded was India. The May 5 State Department “Do Not Travel” advisory for India, citing a “very high level” of COVID-19, still holds.

Another recommended source of information is the Department of State website, which provides updated information on COVID-19 and other risks searchable by country.


A Pandemic Dog Delays Travel Plans

When asked about whether or not he would travel this summer, Wu responded, “I’ve been vaccinated for over 6 months and I’ve been actually itching to get on a plane to visit my parents.”

Both of his elderly parents are vaccinated as well, so Wu believes it is safe for him to go visit them in Hawaii.

What’s the catch? A relatively new family member. Wu adopted a pandemic dog in the past year “and it is proving problematic to put the dog into boarding. That’s what’s keeping me from booking my trip, but I hope to do that in the next month or so.”


A New Hopeful Phase

“We are in a year and a half into this pandemic and we’re entering a new, exciting and hopeful phase,” Wu said

Because COVID-19 is a global concern, particularly for travelers, he welcomed the news that the U.S. plans to donate another 500 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines to the world. “This is excellent news that comes just as much of the world is opening up to travelers again.”



WebMD Health News


Sources

Henry Wu, MD, director, Emory TravelWell Center, associate professor, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta.

White House COVID-19 Response Task Force, press briefing, June 10, 2021.

Scott Pauley, press officer, CDC.

CNN: “2 passengers on Celebrity Millennium cruise test positive for Covid-19.”

.



© 2021 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.





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Planning to visit or return to Hawaii this summer? Here’s what you need to know about Safe Travels for a smooth trip


After spending a year cooped up inside with minimal social interactions, you’re probably itching to get out of the house (or even off the island) to see family and friends. I didn’t hesitate especially after getting fully vaccinated.

A few weeks ago, I traveled to Portland, Ore., to visit my friends whom I haven’t seen in years since they moved away from Oahu. It was refreshing to catch up with my friends just like old times and explore the food scene in Portland complete with a trip to Trader Joe’s and Voodoo Doughnut.

 

DIANE S. W. LEE / DLEE@STARADVERTISER.COM
A trip to Portland isn’t complete without a visit to the famous Voodoo Doughnut.

 

Last month, the CDC updated its guidance saying fully vaccinated people can travel within the U.S. and did not need to take a COVID-19 test or self-quarantine as long as they take the proper precautions such as wearing masks, practice social distance and avoid crowds.

Despite CDC’s guidance, Hawaii is still behind the curve. As of Friday, trans-Pacific travelers must either get tested for COVID-19 or self-quarantine if they visit or return to Hawaii from the mainland. Yes, you still need to take a pre-travel test or quarantine even if you have a vaccination record card (and sticker) to prove your vaccination status.

Traveling is stressful. As if the long lines and concerns about catching a virus weren’t enough already — tack on a COVID-19 test to your trip.

Gov. David Ige on Friday announced that beginning June 15, COVID-19 restrictions on intercounty travel between the Hawaiian islands would end, and the quarantine exemption would be extended for returning Hawaii travelers who can verify being fully vaccinated in Hawaii.

“Those returning who have been vaccinated in the state with one or both shots will be able to travel (to the mainland) without having to get a pre-travel test and can arrive here in the islands and not be subject to quarantine,” Ige said Friday.

But until June 15, Hawaii residents returning to the state still must have a negative pre-travel test before returning home to avoid quarantine.

If you’re a tourist visiting the islands or a local traveling to the mainland this summer with plans to return home to Hawaii, then here’s what you need to know to help make your trip go as smoothly as possible.


 


SIGN UP FOR SAFE TRAVELS HAWAII

The state requires all travelers to register on the Safe Travels website. Go to travel.hawaii.gov to sign up for an account. The website is clunky on the mobile browser, so I’d recommend using a desktop computer to create an account and fill out your upcoming trip information. Expect to provide your travel dates, flight information, government-issued identification and details about your destination upon returning to Hawaii.


 


SIGN UP FOR A COVID-19 TEST

If you want to skip the mandatory 10-day self-quarantine, you must get tested for COVID-19 within 72 hours before your flight to Hawaii.

However, starting June 15, returning residents may skip the quarantine period or pre-travel testing as long as they can provide proof of Hawaii vaccination status. Trans-Pacific travelers will need to quarantine or get tested until Hawaii reaches the goal of 60% vaccinated statewide. More than 52% of the state’s population has been vaccinated as of Thursday, according to state health data.

If you do not qualify for an exemption, sign up to take the test at least two days before your flight. The test result should be ready before you board (reminder: you’ll need to upload the document to the Safe Travels website).

Important: The state only accepts tests from “trusted testing and travel partners,” which includes CVS Health, Kaiser Permanente, Walgreens and Costco/AZOVA. Note that the state doesn’t accept just any COVID-19 test. To be more specific, you must take a nucleic acid amplification test from a certified clinical lab. View the full list of approved partners at this link.

I decided to go with Carbon Health, which promised my test result by 2 p.m. the following day. The testing site was also conveniently located at the Portland International Airport, a short distance away from my appointment to pick up a rental car.


 


GO TAKE THE TEST

I arrived about 10 minutes early to my appointment at PDX, where Carbon Health set up tents just outside the terminal. A nurse at the entrance confirmed my appointment and waved me through to a white tent.

 

DIANE S. W. LEE / DLEE@STARADVERTISER.COM
Carbon Health set up white tents for COVID-19 testing just outside the terminal of Portland International Airport.

 

Another nurse inside the tent greeted me with a test tube and asked me to verify my personal information on the sticker. She stuck a nasal swab up my nose. It was a quick, slightly uncomfortable, but painless experience.

HMSA didn’t cover the cost of my COVID-19 test, so I paid $170 out of pocket. Lucky me.


 


UPLOAD YOUR TEST RESULT

I received a text message that my COVID-19 test result was ready the following day. I logged on to Carbon Health’s app and downloaded my negative test result document and saved it onto the Downloads folder on my iPhone.

I had a small panic attack when the file failed to upload multiple times to the Safe Travels website. I soon realized the website couldn’t recognize the document because the file name was missing .PDF at the end. After I updated the file name and uploaded the refreshed document, the website immediately accepted and recognized my negative test result.

Note: The negative test result must be uploaded to the site before your departure. Another option is to print out the document so you can show it to the gate agent upon arrival in Hawaii.


 


FILL OUT THE HEALTH QUESTIONNAIRE

Within 24 hours of your flight to Hawaii, complete the mandatory health questionnaire on the Safe Travels website.

After I answered a handful of questions, within a few minutes I received an email from the state with a QR code. “Each adult must have their own QR code,” according to the email.

Make sure your phone is fully charged before boarding your flight. You’ll need to show the QR code on your mobile phone to the gate agent.

Tip: Screenshot the QR code on your phone as a backup just in case you run into any internet problems accessing your email. Got access to a printer? Even better. Print out a copy of your QR code email and bring it with you to the airport.


 


SHOW YOUR QR CODE TO THE GATE AGENT

After the Alaska Airlines agent scanned my QR code at the gate, she placed a green Pre-Clear wristband around my right arm.

 

DIANE S. W. LEE / DLEE@STARADVERTISER.COM
This is the green Pre-Clear wristband you’ll receive after showing a QR code to the gate agent at Portland International Airport. Travelers can either submit a pre-travel COVID-19 test or self-quarantine for 10 days upon arrival in Hawaii.

 

I boarded my nonstop flight home. About six hours later, I got off at the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport. I flashed the wristband on my arm to the Honolulu agent at the gate who waved me through.

Home, at last.


 


NO COVID TEST?

If you’re a returning resident who can verify being fully vaccinated in Hawaii, Ige said Friday you can just skip the quarantine and pre-travel testing beginning June 15.

Until then, the only other option is to self-quarantine at home, at a hotel or at the residence of your family or friends. Even if you decide to skip the COVID-19 test, you are required to quarantine for 10 days or the length of your stay, whichever is shorter.

Hawaii takes self-quarantine violators seriously (see this story and this one), so stay inside and avoid making trips outside such as to the beach, grocery store, or restaurant during the quarantine period.

H̶a̶p̶p̶y̶ Safe travels, this summer!

———

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated to reflect Gov. David Ige’s announcement Friday to ease travel restrictions beginning June 15.


Diane S. W. Lee is the multimedia and engagement editor at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.






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Reed to discuss efforts to keep air travel safe amid uptick of in-flight violence


WARWICK, R.I. (WPRI) — Sen. Jack Reed is joining flight attendants and Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officials at T.F. Airport on Thursday to discuss efforts to keep air travel safe.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has received approximately 2,500 reports of unruly behavior by passengers since the beginning of the year, more than 20 times the number of incidents typically referred to the agency all year.

Of the roughly 2,500 reports of in-flight violence, the FAA says about 1,900 reports involve passengers refusing to comply with the federal face mask mandate.

Until further notice, those traveling are still required to wear a mask on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States, and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations.

Amid the uptick of in-flight incidents involving disruptive passengers, Reed says more must be done to keep airline passengers and their crews safe, especially with more people expected to travel this summer.

The TSA recorded more than 1.95 million people passing through security checkpoints at American airports last Friday, the busiest air travel day since the start of the pandemic last year. The high number of travelers last week compares to just 353,261 people traveling through U.S. airports last year.

Recently, both American Airlines and Southwest Airlines announced temporary plans to postpone alcohol sales onboard flights.

Reed, a senior member of the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies (THUD) Appropriations Subcommittee, says more comprehensive action is needed, including prosecuting bad behavior onboard flights to the fullest extent of the law.

A news release from Reed’s office says the senator is also exploring a range of federal efforts to stiffen penalties for those convicted of violently assaulting a crewmember.

According to the FAA, federal law prohibits interfering with aircraft crew, physically assaulting or threatening to physically assault aircraft crew or anyone else on an aircraft. Passengers are subject to civil penalties for that kind of misconduct, though federal law provides for criminal fines and imprisonment of passengers who interfere with the performance of a crewmember’s duties by assaulting or intimidating that crewmember.

The FAA is strictly enforcing a zero-tolerance policy toward passengers who cause disturbances on flights or fail to obey flight crew instructions in violation of the FAA’s regulations or engage in conduct proscribed by federal law.

Last week, the FAA proposed civil penalties ranging from $9,000 to $15,000 against five airline passengers for “allegedly interfering with and, in two cases, assaulting flight attendants who instructed them to obey cabin crew instructions and various federal regulations.”



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Timely tips for safe travel during the pandemic


WILKES-BARRE TOWNSHIP, LUZERNE COUNTY (WBRE/WYOU-TV) — With more people vaccinated against COVID-19, many are looking to travel in the coming weeks and months.

That journey may be a trip to the shore measured in a few days or a much longer vacation somewhere in the U.S. or abroad.



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EU Agrees to Add Japan to Safe Travel List, Holds off on Britain | World News


BRUSSELS (Reuters) – European Union governments agreed on Wednesday to add Japan to their small list of countries from which they will allow non-essential travel, while holding off until at least mid-June for British tourists, EU sources said on Tuesday.

Ambassadors from the EU’s 27 countries approved the addition of Japan at a meeting on Wednesday, with the change to take effect in the coming days.

EU countries are recommended gradually to lift travel restrictions for the current seven countries on the list – Australia, Israel, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea and Thailand.

Individual EU countries can still opt to demand a negative COVID-19 test or a period of quarantine.

The EU last month eased criteria for adding new countries to the list, by changing to 75 from 25 the maximum number of new COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people in the previous 14 days.

Political Cartoons on World Leaders

Britain met that revised target but was left off the list because of an increase in COVID-19 cases arising from an infectious coronavirus variant first identified in India.

Britain recorded no COVID-19 deaths on Tuesday, for the first time since March 2020, but cases of the Indian variant doubled last week and the government has said it is too early to say whether Britain can fully drop restrictions on June 21.

EU diplomats said Britain could be added to the list, depending on the course of the variant, in mid-June, when a larger group of countries are expected to be considered.

The list is designed to eliminate inconsistency of travel restrictions across the bloc.

France and Germany have imposed quarantines on UK visitors and Austria banned British tourists, while Portugal and Spain now welcome them.

Meanwhile, Britain advises against travel to all EU countries except Portugal and only exempts people coming from Portugal from a requirement to quarantine.

(Reporting by Philip Blenkinsop; Editing by Steve Orlofsky)

Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters.



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Tips to keep your dog healthy and safe outdoors this summer


With temperate summers in the upper Midwest, the chance to get outside with your dog is abundant and enjoyed by many. Whether strenuously hiking in a state park or simply walking around the block, it’s an opportunity that provides both exercise and companionship for you and your pet.

Yet with fun in the sun comes potential dangers for our furry friends. From increased exposure to ticks and other insects to sunburn and even heatstroke, all sorts of issues can arise for our dogs in the summertime, the American Kennel Club said.

Nevertheless, you can avoid a potentially bad situation for your dog by staying vigilant and keeping the following tips from the AKC and American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in mind. With some awareness and preparedness, you can keep your furry best friend safe and healthy while enjoying time outside together this summer.

Avoid hot pavement

According to the AKC, owners should avoid letting their dogs walk on pavement in the heat, and instead, stick to grass or a mulched greenway or trail. Pixabay photo.

According to the AKC, owners should avoid letting their dogs walk on pavement in the heat, and instead, stick to grass or a mulched greenway or trail. Pixabay photo.

Soaring summer temperatures mean hot pavement outdoors, which, in turn, means the possibility of burnt doggy paws when out for a stroll.

In fact, asphalt temperatures can be significantly hotter than air temperatures. For example, if it’s 77 degrees out, pavement that’s been baking in the sun can potentially be up to 125 degrees.

At that temperature, skin damage can occur in just one minute, so it’s important for owners to check the asphalt prior to allowing their pet to walk on it. Remember, if it’s too hot for your bare feet, it’s too hot for their paws.

According to the AKC, owners should avoid letting their dogs walk on pavement in the heat, and instead, stick to grass or a mulched greenway or trail. If there are no natural areas — excluding sand — to walk on, owners should consider investing in lightweight pet booties (not made of rubber or silicone, which can make feet hotter).

Combat pests

To prepare for outdoor activity this summer, dog owners should first get their pet examined by a veterinarian to ensure its in good health and to discuss options for heartworm, flea and tick medication. Pixabay photo.

To prepare for outdoor activity this summer, dog owners should first get their pet examined by a veterinarian to ensure its in good health and to discuss options for heartworm, flea and tick medication. Pixabay photo.

Annoying critters — like ticks, fleas and mosquitoes — are plentiful this time of year and cause issues with humans and canines alike.

Yet for dogs, mosquitoes can transmit heartworms to them through a bite, which can later cause heart damage. According to the ASPCA, owners should try to avoid areas that tend to be infested with mosquitos, like bodies of stagnant water; and they should also talk to their veterinarian about heartworm prevention options.

While at the vet, owners should also discuss options for preventing fleas and ticks. Fleas cause itchy skin that can become irritated or damaged from constant biting and scratching. Ticks, on the other hand, can cause Lyme disease, which can create serious health problems if not caught and treated early.

The AKC recommends that owners regularly check their dogs — including on the ears, belly, armpits and tail — for fleas and ticks after spending time outside.

Be vigilant of overheating

According to the AKC, if your dog’s panting grows excessively heavy and is followed by disorientation or fast, noisy breathing, they may be overheated. Other possible signs include collapsing or convulsing, bright red or blue gums, vomiting and diarrhea. Pixabay photo.

According to the AKC, if your dog’s panting grows excessively heavy and is followed by disorientation or fast, noisy breathing, they may be overheated. Other possible signs include collapsing or convulsing, bright red or blue gums, vomiting and diarrhea. Pixabay photo.

Another hot weather concern in dogs is the potential to become overheated, which, without immediate treatment, can lead to heat exhaustion, heatstroke or death.

Dogs aim to please their owners; so that hot weather walk or run they’re joining you on might be harder than they’re letting on as they attempt to keep pace.

According to the AKC, if your dog’s panting grows excessively heavy and is followed by disorientation or fast, noisy breathing, they may be overheated. Other possible signs include collapsing or convulsing, bright red or blue gums, vomiting and diarrhea.

To prevent overheating in dogs, owners should avoid taking them outdoors for long periods of time on especially hot days. According to pet tip website DogTipper, pets are at risk for heatstroke once the outside temperature hits at least 80 degrees and a humidity of at least 90%.

Regardless of temperature, however, owners should encourage their dogs to drink water often and offer them occasional rest when performing any activity outside.

However, if your dog shows signs of being overheated, the Humane Society suggests moving them to a shady or air-conditioned spot, applying ice packs and cold towels, and encouraging them to lick ice cubes or drink water. They should then be taken directly to a veterinarian.

Watch out for toxic flora, fauna

When outdoors, it’s important to keep your dog leashed to ensure they’re away from predators and aren’t poking their noses in and around things they shouldn’t, such as plants, fungi and animals that are poisonous to them. Pixabay photo.

When outdoors, it’s important to keep your dog leashed to ensure they’re away from predators and aren’t poking their noses in and around things they shouldn’t, such as plants, fungi and animals that are poisonous to them. Pixabay photo.

When outdoors, it’s important to keep your dog leashed to ensure they’re away from predators and aren’t poking their noses in and around things they shouldn’t, such as plants, fungi and animals that are poisonous to them.

According to the AKC, many shrubs, trees, and flowers — like azaleas, tulips, lilies, daffodils, and hydrangea — commonly found in the garden and in the wild are dangerous if consumed by dogs. While some can cause discomfort, others can be fatal if ingested. Additionally, the ASPCA adds that certain kinds of frogs, toads, snakes, and spiders can be poisonous to dogs.

It’s helpful for pet owners to have a general idea of what plants and animals in their area are toxic to canines so that they can be avoided. The ASPCA has an extensive list of both toxic and nontoxic plants on its website.

Limit play in some waters

The ASPCA recommends avoiding letting your dog splash around in or drink water from an outdoor source, especially if it looks brackish. It is suggested that owners bring along their own water for their dog to drink. Pixabay photo.

The ASPCA recommends avoiding letting your dog splash around in or drink water from an outdoor source, especially if it looks brackish. It is suggested that owners bring along their own water for their dog to drink. Pixabay photo.

According to the ASPCA, stagnant bodies of water, like ponds, lakes, and trickling streams, can contain harmful parasites and waterborne pathogens. Some of these, when ingested, can then cause gastrointestinal distress, among other issues.

In Minnesota in 2019, dog owners were told to beware of blue-green algae after a dog’s death was suspected to be linked to exposure, a report from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency said. The agency recommended that owners check water conditions before their dogs played near lakes or slow-flowing streams, and keep them away from algae-laden water entirely.

“Blue-green algae ‘blooms’ have a thick, cloudy appearance that can look like green paint, pea soup or floating mats of scum,” the report said. “Some, but not all, species of blue-green algae contain potent toxins that can be deadly to dogs, livestock and other animals within hours of contact.”

If a dog goes into water bodies with heavy algae growth, the agency recommended hosing them off immediately, before they have a chance to lick clean. If exposure to the algae is suspected, animals should be taken to a veterinarian immediately.

Preventing dogs from drinking affected water or licking toxins from their coat is key to preventing illness, the report said. Additionally, in general, the ASPCA recommends avoiding letting your dog splash around in or drink water from an outdoor source, especially if it looks brackish. It is suggested that owners bring along their own water for their dogs to drink.

Prevent sunburn

The AKC said it is best to use sunscreen designed for canines, so it is recommended to consult with a veterinarian for options. Additionally, to minimize a dog’s risk of sunburn, it is recommended to limit their sun exposure during peak hours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pixabay photo.

The AKC said it is best to use sunscreen designed for canines, so it is recommended to consult with a veterinarian for options. Additionally, to minimize a dog’s risk of sunburn, it is recommended to limit their sun exposure during peak hours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pixabay photo.

It may come as a surprise, but dogs can get a sunburn — and experience sun exposure complications, like skin cancer — just as people do. But, according to the AKC, by taking certain precautions, like using sunscreen, your dog’s risk of developing sun-related medical issues can be decreased.

Typically, short-haired (and hairless) or light-colored dogs are more at risk for sunburn. Dogs with light-pigmented noses and eyelids, such as bulldogs, collies and Australian sheepdogs, are at risk as well.

The AKC said it is best to use sunscreen designed for canines, so it is recommended to consult with a veterinarian for options. Additionally, to minimize a dog’s risk of sunburn, it is recommended to limit their sun exposure during peak hours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Tips for hiking with your pup

A couple walks their longhaired dachshunds in Grand Portage State Park in mid-May. With temperate summers in the upper Midwest, the chance to get outside with your dog is abundant and enjoyed by many. (Annalise Braught / Bemidji Pioneer)

A couple walks their longhaired dachshunds in Grand Portage State Park in mid-May. With temperate summers in the upper Midwest, the chance to get outside with your dog is abundant and enjoyed by many. (Annalise Braught / Bemidji Pioneer)

Interested in hiking with your pup in Minnesota? Sidewalk Dog Media, an online company that provides dog-friendly travel guides, took a poll of Dog-Friendly Minneapolis-St Paul Facebook group’s favorite dog-friendly hikes in Minnesota. These were the results:

  • Whitetail Woods Regional Park in Farmington

  • Quarry Park and Nature Preserve in St. Cloud

  • Ely’s Peak in Duluth

  • Louisville Swamp in Louisville Township

  • Tettegouche State Park in Silver Bay

  • Grand Portage State Park in Grand Portage

  • Glacial Lakes State Park in Starbuck

  • Montissippi Regional Park in Monticello

  • Fort Snelling State Park in St Paul

  • Lebanon Hills Regional Park in Eagan

Sign up for the Northland Outdoors newseletter



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Tips to keep your dog healthy and safe outdoors this summer


With temperate summers in the upper Midwest, the chance to get outside with your dog is abundant and enjoyed by many. Whether strenuously hiking in a state park or simply walking around the block, it’s an opportunity that provides both exercise and companionship for you and your pet.

Yet with fun in the sun comes potential dangers for our furry friends. From increased exposure to ticks and other insects to sunburn and even heatstroke, all sorts of issues can arise for our dogs in the summertime, the American Kennel Club said.

Nevertheless, you can avoid a potentially bad situation for your dog by staying vigilant and keeping the following tips from the AKC and American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in mind. With some awareness and preparedness, you can keep your furry best friend safe and healthy while enjoying time outside together this summer.

Avoid hot pavement

According to the AKC, owners should avoid letting their dogs walk on pavement in the heat, and instead, stick to grass or a mulched greenway or trail. Pixabay photo.

According to the AKC, owners should avoid letting their dogs walk on pavement in the heat, and instead, stick to grass or a mulched greenway or trail. Pixabay photo.

Soaring summer temperatures mean hot pavement outdoors, which, in turn, means the possibility of burnt doggy paws when out for a stroll.

In fact, asphalt temperatures can be significantly hotter than air temperatures. For example, if it’s 77 degrees out, pavement that’s been baking in the sun can potentially be up to 125 degrees.

At that temperature, skin damage can occur in just one minute, so it’s important for owners to check the asphalt prior to allowing their pet to walk on it. Remember, if it’s too hot for your bare feet, it’s too hot for their paws.

According to the AKC, owners should avoid letting their dogs walk on pavement in the heat, and instead, stick to grass or a mulched greenway or trail. If there are no natural areas — excluding sand — to walk on, owners should consider investing in lightweight pet booties (not made of rubber or silicone, which can make feet hotter).

Combat pests

To prepare for outdoor activity this summer, dog owners should first get their pet examined by a veterinarian to ensure its in good health and to discuss options for heartworm, flea and tick medication. Pixabay photo.

To prepare for outdoor activity this summer, dog owners should first get their pet examined by a veterinarian to ensure its in good health and to discuss options for heartworm, flea and tick medication. Pixabay photo.

Annoying critters — like ticks, fleas and mosquitoes — are plentiful this time of year and cause issues with humans and canines alike.

Yet for dogs, mosquitoes can transmit heartworms to them through a bite, which can later cause heart damage. According to the ASPCA, owners should try to avoid areas that tend to be infested with mosquitos, like bodies of stagnant water; and they should also talk to their veterinarian about heartworm prevention options.

While at the vet, owners should also discuss options for preventing fleas and ticks. Fleas cause itchy skin that can become irritated or damaged from constant biting and scratching. Ticks, on the other hand, can cause Lyme disease, which can create serious health problems if not caught and treated early.

The AKC recommends that owners regularly check their dogs — including on the ears, belly, armpits and tail — for fleas and ticks after spending time outside.

Be vigilant of overheating

According to the AKC, if your dog’s panting grows excessively heavy and is followed by disorientation or fast, noisy breathing, they may be overheated. Other possible signs include collapsing or convulsing, bright red or blue gums, vomiting and diarrhea. Pixabay photo.

According to the AKC, if your dog’s panting grows excessively heavy and is followed by disorientation or fast, noisy breathing, they may be overheated. Other possible signs include collapsing or convulsing, bright red or blue gums, vomiting and diarrhea. Pixabay photo.

Another hot weather concern in dogs is the potential to become overheated, which, without immediate treatment, can lead to heat exhaustion, heatstroke or death.

Dogs aim to please their owners; so that hot weather walk or run they’re joining you on might be harder than they’re letting on as they attempt to keep pace.

According to the AKC, if your dog’s panting grows excessively heavy and is followed by disorientation or fast, noisy breathing, they may be overheated. Other possible signs include collapsing or convulsing, bright red or blue gums, vomiting and diarrhea.

To prevent overheating in dogs, owners should avoid taking them outdoors for long periods of time on especially hot days. According to pet tip website DogTipper, pets are at risk for heatstroke once the outside temperature hits at least 80 degrees and a humidity of at least 90%.

Regardless of temperature, however, owners should encourage their dogs to drink water often and offer them occasional rest when performing any activity outside.

However, if your dog shows signs of being overheated, the Humane Society suggests moving them to a shady or air-conditioned spot, applying ice packs and cold towels, and encouraging them to lick ice cubes or drink water. They should then be taken directly to a veterinarian.

Watch out for toxic flora, fauna

When outdoors, it’s important to keep your dog leashed to ensure they’re away from predators and aren’t poking their noses in and around things they shouldn’t, such as plants, fungi and animals that are poisonous to them. Pixabay photo.

When outdoors, it’s important to keep your dog leashed to ensure they’re away from predators and aren’t poking their noses in and around things they shouldn’t, such as plants, fungi and animals that are poisonous to them. Pixabay photo.

When outdoors, it’s important to keep your dog leashed to ensure they’re away from predators and aren’t poking their noses in and around things they shouldn’t, such as plants, fungi and animals that are poisonous to them.

According to the AKC, many shrubs, trees, and flowers — like azaleas, tulips, lilies, daffodils, and hydrangea — commonly found in the garden and in the wild are dangerous if consumed by dogs. While some can cause discomfort, others can be fatal if ingested. Additionally, the ASPCA adds that certain kinds of frogs, toads, snakes, and spiders can be poisonous to dogs.

It’s helpful for pet owners to have a general idea of what plants and animals in their area are toxic to canines so that they can be avoided. The ASPCA has an extensive list of both toxic and nontoxic plants on its website.

Limit play in some waters

The ASPCA recommends avoiding letting your dog splash around in or drink water from an outdoor source, especially if it looks brackish. It is suggested that owners bring along their own water for their dog to drink. Pixabay photo.

The ASPCA recommends avoiding letting your dog splash around in or drink water from an outdoor source, especially if it looks brackish. It is suggested that owners bring along their own water for their dog to drink. Pixabay photo.

According to the ASPCA, stagnant bodies of water, like ponds, lakes, and trickling streams, can contain harmful parasites and waterborne pathogens. Some of these, when ingested, can then cause gastrointestinal distress, among other issues.

In Minnesota in 2019, dog owners were told to beware of blue-green algae after a dog’s death was suspected to be linked to exposure, a report from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency said. The agency recommended that owners check water conditions before their dogs played near lakes or slow-flowing streams, and keep them away from algae-laden water entirely.

“Blue-green algae ‘blooms’ have a thick, cloudy appearance that can look like green paint, pea soup or floating mats of scum,” the report said. “Some, but not all, species of blue-green algae contain potent toxins that can be deadly to dogs, livestock and other animals within hours of contact.”

If a dog goes into water bodies with heavy algae growth, the agency recommended hosing them off immediately, before they have a chance to lick clean. If exposure to the algae is suspected, animals should be taken to a veterinarian immediately.

Preventing dogs from drinking affected water or licking toxins from their coat is key to preventing illness, the report said. Additionally, in general, the ASPCA recommends avoiding letting your dog splash around in or drink water from an outdoor source, especially if it looks brackish. It is suggested that owners bring along their own water for their dogs to drink.

Prevent sunburn

The AKC said it is best to use sunscreen designed for canines, so it is recommended to consult with a veterinarian for options. Additionally, to minimize a dog’s risk of sunburn, it is recommended to limit their sun exposure during peak hours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pixabay photo.

The AKC said it is best to use sunscreen designed for canines, so it is recommended to consult with a veterinarian for options. Additionally, to minimize a dog’s risk of sunburn, it is recommended to limit their sun exposure during peak hours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pixabay photo.

It may come as a surprise, but dogs can get a sunburn — and experience sun exposure complications, like skin cancer — just as people do. But, according to the AKC, by taking certain precautions, like using sunscreen, your dog’s risk of developing sun-related medical issues can be decreased.

Typically, short-haired (and hairless) or light-colored dogs are more at risk for sunburn. Dogs with light-pigmented noses and eyelids, such as bulldogs, collies and Australian sheepdogs, are at risk as well.

The AKC said it is best to use sunscreen designed for canines, so it is recommended to consult with a veterinarian for options. Additionally, to minimize a dog’s risk of sunburn, it is recommended to limit their sun exposure during peak hours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Tips for hiking with your pup

A couple walks their longhaired dachshunds in Grand Portage State Park in mid-May. With temperate summers in the upper Midwest, the chance to get outside with your dog is abundant and enjoyed by many. (Annalise Braught / Bemidji Pioneer)

A couple walks their longhaired dachshunds in Grand Portage State Park in mid-May. With temperate summers in the upper Midwest, the chance to get outside with your dog is abundant and enjoyed by many. (Annalise Braught / Bemidji Pioneer)

Interested in hiking with your pup in Minnesota? Sidewalk Dog Media, an online company that provides dog-friendly travel guides, took a poll of Dog-Friendly Minneapolis-St Paul Facebook group’s favorite dog-friendly hikes in Minnesota. These were the results:

  • Whitetail Woods Regional Park in Farmington

  • Quarry Park and Nature Preserve in St. Cloud

  • Ely’s Peak in Duluth

  • Louisville Swamp in Louisville Township

  • Tettegouche State Park in Silver Bay

  • Grand Portage State Park in Grand Portage

  • Glacial Lakes State Park in Starbuck

  • Montissippi Regional Park in Monticello

  • Fort Snelling State Park in St Paul

  • Lebanon Hills Regional Park in Eagan

Sign up for the Northland Outdoors newseletter





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