Richard Rico | New life in aging sites – The Vacaville Reporter


ONE of downtown Vacaville’s most storied buildings—from housing several savings and loan branches to a community-connected, iconic travel agency–has itself been launched on a new journey.

Wasserman Travel, wedged by Merchant and Parker Streets since 1994, has been sold by Wasserman family’s Jim Kellogg to Tom Rapisarda, a rising star in Vaca’s real estate firmament. He has a vision for his new site’s new life. “I’d really, really like to bring in a restaurant” to the 3,800 sq. ft. space, Tom said. That depends, of course, on getting a like-minded tenant.

The site includes off-street parking, which could be used for outdoor dining. At the same time, Rapisarda purchased a long-vacant lot next to Merchant & Main on which he plans to build a realty office for his firm. Early Vacans will remember that property as home of Walter Hansel Ford. I can still see Walt pull up at The Reporter in our new-generation ’49 sedan. In recent months, Tom and his family made a personal and historic purchase –the stately Hartley House at 100 Buck, at the corner of West St., a citadel at one end of the so-called Avenue of the Giants.

* * *

WASSERMAN Travel’s web of moving parts includes Central Calif. Federal Savings & Loan; Heart Federal S&L; US Bank; American S&L; Bank of America, Vaca Saturday Club and a time capsule sealed 50 years ago, but never opened.

The first piece in the mosaic was set in place in 1909 when Vacaville Saturday Club was formed, the first women’s civic and social club in Solano. It met in various venues until 1936 when a fire in the Vacaville Inn on Merchant St. caused big damage. Sat. Club took it over. All went well, until BofA decided to enlarge its Main St. branch. It liked the club property and offered to build them a new clubhouse on Kendal St. in exchange for its Merchant St. site. It’s still the club home.

In the 1960s, Central Calif. Federal Savings & Loan sent Obie Ladd here to open its first satellite branch. It opened in a tiny space on Main St. Not long after, the S&L bought the site near the tip of Parker-Merchant, Obie’s son, John, told me. His dad built it, and we all came. In later years, the S&L name was changed to Heart Federal S&L. In 1971, the time capsule was embedded in its walls. One item was a column by me: “Greetings to the people of Vacaville of 1980,” and so on. In 1971, Obie’s branch moved across Merchant, the capsule with it. It’s still there, in the base of a flagpole. The intent was to open it in 20 or 30 years.

SATURDAY Club got its new home and BofA built its new bank. It soon outgrew it, and built its present branch on Parker St. Heart Federal wanted BofA’s vacated site on Merchant, and got that. The building is now home to US Bank. (Don’t worry, there won’t be a quiz.) The capsule followed them, and so did Obie Ladd’s name—it’s on the plaque at the base of the pole. Another S&L moved in behind Heart Federal. Then came the Wassermans. They were operating their travel agency in the Cal-Hawaii building on Mason St. In 1994, WWII pilot Morris Wasserman, his wife Betty and daughter Wendy made a bid for the building for a new Wasserman Travel. They got it. In 1982, Wendy and Jim Kellogg were married. He became part of the family, and the company. In the latter 2000s, a dark cloud moved in over them. Morrie died in 2017, Wendy in 2018, Betty in 2021. COVID raged. Travel all but stopped. Jim had to lay off employees, and worked at home. “The agency isn’t closed,” Jim told me this week. “I am taking and making calls–(707) 447-1100–honoring trips contracted but not taken during the pandemic.” I flashed on times when one of my flights to Europe ran into a snag. A frantic call home called Morrie into action. In no time, a new ticket was waiting for me at the terminal. It’s called service.

Weeks ago, Jim sold the building to Tom Rapisarda; he’s on a roll toward his own future. By honoring a past that filled his life, so is Jim. One of these days we’ll explore what’s inside that time capsule. I wonder what I predicted 50 years ago.

The author is former publisher of The Reporter.



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Richard Branson space flight news


The Virgin Galactic’s VSS Unity has officially taken off.

The flight, which has billionaire Richard Branson and other passengers aboard, conducted more than 20 test flights, three of which have reached the edge of space, CNN has reported.

It is affixed to a mothership, called WhiteKnightTwo, that looks like two sleek jets attached at the tip of their wings. 

The mothership will take about 45 minutes to cruise along and slowly climb with VSS Unity to between 40,000 and 50,000 feet. 

When the pilots give the go-ahead, the space plane will drop from between WhiteKnightTwo’s two fuselages and fire up its rocket engine, swooping directly upward and roaring past the speed of sound.



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Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic Space Trip Delayed Slightly by Weather


TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES, N.M.—Richard Branson is scheduled to travel to the edge of space Sunday in a flight aimed at spurring a new, multibillion-dollar space-tourism industry.

The flight, originally scheduled for 9 a.m. ET, was delayed 90 minutes on Sunday because of weather overnight at the launch facility in New Mexico. The launch is now scheduled for 10:30 a.m. ET.

At that time, a high-flying Virgin Galactic Holdings Inc. airplane is expected to take off from the Spaceport America facility near Truth or Consequences. The plane, called the VMS Eve, will carry the spacecraft VSS Unity, which will include Mr. Branson and five others.

The plane will take the spacecraft about 8.5 miles above Earth before releasing Unity about an hour after takeoff. The spacecraft will then rocket to an altitude of more than 50 miles.

The spacecraft is expected to land back in New Mexico shortly after 11:30 a.m. ET, gliding down for a runway landing.



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Richard Branson’s flight signals confidence in commercial space travel – Spaceflight Now


Virgin Galactic’s VSS Unity rocketplane is released for a glide flight over New Mexico last year. Credit: Virgin Galactic

Virgin Galactic-founder Richard Branson and five company crewmates are set to take a barnstorming ride to space Sunday in a bold show of confidence in his company’s readiness to start carrying passengers on brief trips out of the atmosphere.

Beating rival Jeff Bezos to space by nine days, Branson and company expect to zoom higher than 50 miles in Virgin’s sleek spaceplane, experiencing a few minutes of weightlessness and out-of-this-world views before gliding back to landing at Spaceport America near Truth or Consequences, New Mexico.

It will be the fourth piloted spaceflight for Virgin’s VSS Unity spaceplane and its 22nd overall. But it will be the first with a crew of six on board and the first with Branson, a high-stakes demonstration of his long-standing commitment to launching private citizens into space.

It also demonstrates the high-stakes nature of the competition to be first in the emerging space tourism marketplace with Virgin Galactic competing head to head with Blue Origin, owned by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, for space tourism dollars.

After 15 unpiloted test flights, Bezos announced last month that he planned to fly aboard his company’s New Shepard spacecraft July 20 when it takes off on its first piloted flight to sub-orbital space. A few days later, Branson upstaged the Amazon founder, announcing he planned to take off nine days earlier.

“Yeah, there’s a little bit of competition in the who’s going first or when things are happening,” Virgin President Mike Moses, a former space shuttle manager at NASA, told CBS News. “But it’s really not a race. It’s not a competition. I know that sounds maybe a little shallow or disingenuous, but it’s not.

“It’s a small community. I know dozens of people who work at Blue Origin, I know dozens and dozens of people at SpaceX, and we all used to work together at NASA. And I wish every single one of them the best. … Because all of us together is what’s going to get humans into space and our culture to recognize that space travel is the foundation for the future for everyone.”

With typical Branson fanfare, Sunday’s flight will be broadcast live across Virgin Galactic’s social media platforms, featuring appearances by Stephen Colbert and retired Canadian space station astronaut Chris Hadfield, along with the performance of a new song by singer-songwriter Khalid.

Even SpaceX founder Elon Musk plans to be watching.

“Will see you there to wish you the best,” he tweeted Saturday.

VSS Unity, mounted beneath the wing of Virgin’s twin-fuselage carrier jet VMS Eve, is scheduled for takeoff from Spaceport America shortly after 9 a.m. EDT.

The crew of the VSS Unity suborbital mission: Pilot Dave Mackay, engineer Colin Bennett, instructor Beth Moses, founder Richard Branson, company vice president Sirisha Bandla, and pilot Michael Masucci. Credit: Virgin Galactic

Joining Branson will be company pilots Dave Mackay and Michael Masucci, both veterans of earlier test flights to space, along with Virgin astronaut trainer Beth Moses, also a flight veteran and Mike Moses’ wife; operations engineer Colin Bennett; and Sirisha Bandla, vice president of government affairs and research.

“This has been a long journey for him,” Mike Moses said of Branson. “He’s like a kid in a candy store here in training this week. He’s bouncing around, he’s happy, excited. … But that excitement is really infectious. And so the whole crew is feeling it.”

Asked if the team felt any pressure because of Branson’s presence on board, not to mention his wife’s, Moses said he would not hesitate to call off the flight if the weather or a technical issue raises a safety concern.

“I’ve scrubbed while Richard was watching before, and if I have to scrub while he’s on board, we will,” Moses said. “It’s a human flown, piloted aircraft. And so we take that safety very, very seriously. And we don’t treat any one crew member as any more or less important than any other.”

Assuming all goes well, VMS Eve will climb to an altitude of about 45,000 feet. At that point, after a final round of safety checks, carrier pilots Rick Sturckow and Kelly Latimer will release Unity to fly on its own.

Seconds after dropping away, Mackay and Masucci will ignite Unity’s hybrid rocket motor, kicking off a high-speed near-vertical climb out of the lower atmosphere, pushing the crew back in their seats with up to three times the normal force of gravity.

During crew training, Mackay told Branson and his crewmates the spaceplane will propel them “nice and smoothly to zero G.”

“It feels wonderful, and you will want to get out of your seat automatically, I think, to unstrap yourself and experience this thing,” he said in a company video shot during training. “To me, it’s all about the view, and it’s absolutely amazing. It’s spectacular.”

After the rocket motor shuts down, the spaceplane will continue climbing on a ballistic trajectory, reaching a high point of more than 50 miles, above the “boundary” of space recognized by NASA and the FAA, before arcing over and beginning the plunge back to Earth.

Along the way, the four passengers will experience about three minutes of weightlessness, allowing them to briefly unstrap and float about the cabin behind the two pilots, taking in spectacular views of Earth and space through 12 windows.

For re-entry, the spaceplane utilizes an innovation pioneered by legendary aircraft designer Burt Rutan — wing-like tailbooms that rotate upward with respect to the fuselage after the vehicle leaves the lower atmosphere.

In the so-called “feathered” orientation, aerodynamic drag is sharply increased, causing the spacecraft to naturally orient itself like a badminton shuttlecock for a relatively low-speed, low-temperature re-entry with minimal piloting.

Once back in the lower atmosphere, the tailbooms will rotate back parallel with the fuselage and the pilots will guide Unity to a landing on Spaceport America’s 12,000-foot-long runway.

If all goes well, Virgin is expected to carry out two more test flights before beginning commercial operations with paying customers on board. Ticket prices have not been announced, but a seat is expected to cost in the neighborhood of $250,000. More than 600 enthusiasts have reserved seats.

“I think we’re seeing the tip of the iceberg with the folks that have stepped forward already,” Moses said. “There’s going to be a huge interest.”





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Richard Branson’s space odssey: Here’s what you need to know


Richard Branson will boldly go where no space baron has gone before on Sunday, when he steps onto the supersonic space plane from his rocket venture, Virgin Galactic.

Branson’s brief joy ride is more than two decades in the making. He founded Virgin Galactic in 2004 with the goal of creating a winged spacecraft capable of taking up to eight people, including two pilots and six passengers, on rocket-powered flights that reach more than 50 miles above Earth, which the US government considers the boundary marking outer space.

Virgin Galactic’s VSS Unity, as the spaceplane is called, has conducted more than 20 test flights, three of which have reached the edge of space and made five Virgin Galactic employees into pin-carrying astronauts. But Branson’s flight will make him the first billionaire founder of space company to actually travel into space aboard a vehicle he helped fund.

Virgin Galactic photo

Sir Richard Branson displays Virgin Galactics new spaceware.. Virgin Glactic photo)

Branson’s flight will take off in the early hours of Sunday, July 11, weather permitting. Virgin Galactic will be posting a livestream — which will be hosted by comedian Stephen Colbert, a spokesperson confirmed to CNN — that morning. Grammy-nominated singer Khalid will also be debuting a new song at the landing site after Branson’s anticipated return, Rolling Stone reported.

CNN Business will also be sharing the livestream and running a live blog with updates.

Here’s everything you need to know before the big event.

Who’s going?

Branson is bringing three colleagues along for the ride. They include:

Beth Moses, who holds the title of Chief Astronaut Instructor at Virgin Galactic and will handle the training for all of the company’s future customers. She’s flown to space on VSS Unity once before, during a 2019 test flight. Moses, an aerospace engineer, won’t just be along for the ride. She’ll be ensuring her fellow passengers stay safe and ensure that Virgin Galactic collects all the data it needs because this flight will be, at the end of the day, still a test flight.

Race to be rocket man: Branson says he’s not competing with Bezos but … really?

Colin Bennett, who is the company’s lead operations engineer. Bennett will help evaluate the overall experience and ensure the cabin equipment is in good shape.

Sirisha Bandla, Virgin Galactic’s vice president of government affairs and research. Bandla will be on board for the science. Virgin Galactic frequently flies experiments to makes use of the microgravity environment, and on this flight Bandla will be handling a University of Florida research project that involves handling “handheld fixation tubes,” according to the company.

Virgin Galactic says that Branson’s job will be to use his “observations from his flight training and spaceflight experience to enhance the journey for all future astronaut customers,” according to the company.

What will happen?

When most people think about spaceflight, they think about an astronaut circling the Earth, floating in space, for at least a few days.

That is not what Branson will be doing on VSS Unity, which is the only operational SpaceShipTwo spaceplane that Virgin Galactic has in its arsenal, though the company is building others.

VSS Unity’s flight path is a wild trip, in general. Rather than taking off vertically from a launch pad like most rockets, the space plane takes off from a runway near Virgin Galactic’s “spaceport” in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico on Sunday morning. (The former town of Hot Springs, New Mexico, changed its named to Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, as part of a 1950s publicity stunt for a radio show and the name has stuck ever since).

VSS Unity will be affixed to a massive mothership, called WhiteKnightTwo, that looks like two sleek jets attached at the tip of their wings. The mothership takes about 45 minutes to cruise along and slowly climb with VSS Unity to about 50,000 feet. Then, when the pilots give the go-ahead, SpaceShipTwo drops from between WhiteKnightTwo’s two fuselages and fires up its rocket engine, swooping directly upward and roaring past the speed of sound.

VSS Unity is a suborbital space plane, meaning it won’t drum up enough speed to escape the pull of Earth’s gravity. Instead, it’ll rocket at more than three times the speed of sound — about 2,300 miles per hour — to more than 50 miles above ground. At the top of the flight path, Branson and his fellow passengers will briefly experience weightlessness. It’s like an extended version of the weightlessness you experience when you reach the peak of a roller coaster hill, just before gravity brings your cart — or, in Branson’s case, your space plane -— gliding back down toward the ground.

After about a minute the engine shuts off, leaving the spacecraft and the passengers suspended in microgravity as SpaceShipTwo rolls onto its belly and offers the passengers sweeping views of the Earth below and the inky black void above.

To conclude the trip, SpaceShipTwo uses what’s called a feathering system to raise its wings, mimicking the shape of a badminton shuttlecock to reorient the vehicle as it begins to fall back to Earth. It then lowers its wings as it glides back down to a runway landing.

A group of reporters will be allowed in to watch the launch. CNN Business will post live updates here as well as carrying live TV coverage.

How is this different from what SpaceX and Blue Origin do?

Bezos’ Blue Origin took a far different approach for its suborbital space tourism rocket. The company’s New Shepard vehicle is a capsule and rocket system that fires off vertically from a launch pad, sending passengers on a screaming 11-minute flight to more than 60 miles high before the capsule deploys parachutes to bring them gently back down.

But when the companies begin commercial operations, Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic will be direct competitors. They’re both after the demographic of ultra-wealthy thrill seekers willing to fork over hundreds of thousands of dollars to experience a supersonic gut punch and a few minutes of weightlessness.

Elon Musk — the other, other space billionaire — is running a far different operation than what Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic will put on display this month.

First off, SpaceX builds orbital rockets. Orbital rockets need to drum up enough power to hit at least 17,000 miles per hour, or what’s known as orbital velocity, essentially giving a spacecraft enough energy to continue whipping around the Earth rather than being dragged immediately back down by gravity. That’s how SpaceX is able to put satellites into orbit or carry astronauts to and from the International Space Station.

Though Branson’s other company — Virgin Orbit — has put a rocket in orbit, and Bezos’ Blue Origin plans to get there eventually with a rocket called New Glenn, neither company has made quite the headlines or the waves in the space sector as SpaceX has.

How risky is this?

Space travel is, historically, fraught with danger. Though the risks are not necessarily astronomical for Branson’s jaunt to suborbital space, as Virgin Galactic has spent the better part of the last two decade running its space planes through test flights.

Still, any time a human straps themselves onto a rocket, there are risks involved — and Branson has apparently decided that, for him, it’s worth it.

“You’ve got to remember that Virgin Galactic has people on every spaceflight…The fact that I’m willing to fly with those people shows confidence,” Branson told CNN Business’ Rachel Crane. “I think the least the founder of the company can do is go up there and fly with his people.”





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Everything you need to know about Richard Branson going to space this weekend


Branson’s brief joy ride is more than two decades in the making. He founded Virgin Galactic in 2004 with the goal of creating a winged spacecraft capable of taking up to eight people, including two pilots and six passengers, on rocket-powered flights that reach more than 50 miles above Earth, which the US government considers the boundary marking outer space.

Virgin Galactic’s VSS Unity, as the spaceplane is called, has conducted more than 20 test flights, three of which have reached the edge of space and made five Virgin Galactic employees into pin-carrying astronauts. But Branson’s flight will make him the first billionaire founder of space company to actually travel into space aboard a vehicle he helped fund.
Branson’s flight will take off in the early hours of Sunday, July 11, weather permitting. Virgin Galactic will be posting a livestream — which will be hosted by comedian Stephen Colbert, a spokesperson confirmed to CNN — that morning. Grammy-nominated singer Khalid will also be debuting a new song at the landing site after Branson’s anticipated return, Rolling Stone reported.

CNN Business will also be sharing the livestream and running a live blog with updates.

Here’s everything you need to know before the big event.

Who’s going?

Branson is bringing three colleagues along for the ride. They include:
  • Beth Moses, who holds the title of Chief Astronaut Instructor at Virgin Galactic and will handle the training for all of the company’s future customers. She’s flown to space on VSS Unity once before, during a 2019 test flight. Moses, an aerospace engineer, won’t just be along for the ride. She’ll be ensuring her fellow passengers stay safe and ensure that Virgin Galactic collects all the data it needs because this flight will be, at the end of the day, still a test flight.
  • Colin Bennett, who is the company’s lead operations engineer. Bennett will help evaluate the overall experience and ensure the cabin equipment is in good shape.
  • Sirisha Bandla, Virgin Galactic’s vice president of government affairs and research. Bandla will be on board for the science. Virgin Galactic frequently flies experiments to makes use of the microgravity environment, and on this flight Bandla will be handling a University of Florida research project that involves handling “handheld fixation tubes,” according to the company.

Virgin Galactic says that Branson’s job will be to use his “observations from his flight training and spaceflight experience to enhance the journey for all future astronaut customers,” according to the company.

What will happen?

When most people think about spaceflight, they think about an astronaut circling the Earth, floating in space, for at least a few days.

That is not what Branson will be doing on VSS Unity, which is the only operational SpaceShipTwo spaceplane that Virgin Galactic has in its arsenal, though the company is building others.

Virgin Galactic launches third successful spaceflight
VSS Unity’s flight path is a wild trip, in general. Rather than taking off vertically from a launch pad like most rockets, the space plane takes off from a runway near Virgin Galactic’s “spaceport” in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico on Sunday morning. (The former town of Hot Springs, New Mexico, changed its named to Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, as part of a 1950s publicity stunt for a radio show and the name has stuck ever since).

VSS Unity will be affixed to a massive mothership, called WhiteKnightTwo, that looks like two sleek jets attached at the tip of their wings. The mothership takes about 45 minutes to cruise along and slowly climb with VSS Unity to about 50,000 feet. Then, when the pilots give the go-ahead, SpaceShipTwo drops from between WhiteKnightTwo’s two fuselages and fires up its rocket engine, swooping directly upward and roaring past the speed of sound.

Virgin Spaceship Unity and Virgin Mothership Eve take to the skies on it's first captive carry flight on 8th September 2016

VSS Unity is a suborbital space plane, meaning it won’t drum up enough speed to escape the pull of Earth’s gravity. Instead, it’ll rocket at more than three times the speed of sound — about 2,300 miles per hour — to more than 50 miles above ground. At the top of the flight path, Branson and his fellow passengers will briefly experience weightlessness. It’s like an extended version of the weightlessness you experience when you reach the peak of a roller coaster hill, just before gravity brings your cart — or, in Branson’s case, your space plane -— gliding back down toward the ground.

After about a minute the engine shuts off, leaving the spacecraft and the passengers suspended in microgravity as SpaceShipTwo rolls onto its belly and offers the passengers sweeping views of the Earth below and the inky black void above.

To conclude the trip, SpaceShipTwo uses what’s called a feathering system to raise its wings, mimicking the shape of a badminton shuttlecock to reorient the vehicle as it begins to fall back to Earth. It then lowers its wings as it glides back down to a runway landing.

A group of reporters will be allowed in to watch the launch. CNN Business will post live updates here as well as carrying live TV coverage.

How is this different from what SpaceX and Blue Origin do?

Bezos’ Blue Origin took a far different approach for its suborbital space tourism rocket. The company’s New Shepard vehicle is a capsule and rocket system that fires off vertically from a launch pad, sending passengers on a screaming 11-minute flight to more than 60 miles high before the capsule deploys parachutes to bring them gently back down.

But when the companies begin commercial operations, Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic will be direct competitors. They’re both after the demographic of ultra-wealthy thrill seekers willing to fork over hundreds of thousands of dollars to experience a supersonic gut punch and a few minutes of weightlessness.

Elon Musk — the other, other space billionaire — is running a far different operation than what Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic will put on display this month.

First off, SpaceX builds orbital rockets. Orbital rockets need to drum up enough power to hit at least 17,000 miles per hour, or what’s known as orbital velocity, essentially giving a spacecraft enough energy to continue whipping around the Earth rather than being dragged immediately back down by gravity. That’s how SpaceX is able to put satellites into orbit or carry astronauts to and from the International Space Station.

Though Branson’s other company — Virgin Orbit — has put a rocket in orbit, and Bezos’ Blue Origin plans to get there eventually with a rocket called New Glenn, neither company has made quite the headlines or the waves in the space sector as SpaceX has.

How risky is this?

Space travel is, historically, fraught with danger. Though the risks are not necessarily astronomical for Branson’s jaunt to suborbital space, as Virgin Galactic has spent the better part of the last two decade running its space planes through test flights.

Still, any time a human straps themselves onto a rocket, there are risks involved — and Branson has apparently decided that, for him, it’s worth it.

Richard Branson is taking a big risk going to space
“You’ve got to remember that Virgin Galactic has people on every spaceflight…The fact that I’m willing to fly with those people shows confidence,” Branson told CNN Business’ Rachel Crane. “I think the least the founder of the company can do is go up there and fly with his people.”





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Richard Barnett request to change bail travel restrictions to be ruled on Thursday


A judge will rule Thursday on travel restrictions for Richard Barnett, a Gravette, Arkansas, man implicated in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol during electoral ballot counting.An attorney for Barnett filed a request asking that he be allowed to travel more than 50 miles from his home. He wants the radius extended.”Specifically, each time Mr. Barnett needs to travel more than 50 miles for work, he needs to get clearance from the court. We feel that is unduly burdensome,” said Joseph McBride, Barnett’s lead defense attorney.In a Tuesday morning hearing, the attorney said Barnett needs to travel for work so he can pay his bills and provide for his family. Barnett buys and sells cars and wants to travel to Petit Jean for work. That’s about a 200-mile drive from Gravette.”We hope that Judge Cooper sides with us in granting Mr. Barnett the ability to make ends meet and provide for his defense and his family while out on bail,” said McBride.40/29 News also reached out to the Federal Prosecuting Attorney but did not get a comment or interview.Barnett’s next status hearing is set for August 24th.Barnett was photographed with his feet up on a desk in Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office during the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. He also took an envelope from her office.A federal judge granted Barnett bail in April, under the following conditions:Home detentionLocation monitoringCannot possess firearms or other weaponsPassport revoked and not allowed to get a new oneNo travel outside of a 50-mile radiusNo associating with anyone from the Jan. 6 insurrectionThe judge cited a lack of criminal history and an absence of evidence proving Barnett would be a danger to the public after release as reasons to set bail.Earlier this year, a federal grand jury indicted Barnett on eight charges:Obstruction of an official proceedingAiding and abettingEntering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weaponDisorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weaponEntering and remaining in certain rooms in the Capitol buildingDisorderly conduct in a Capitol buildingParading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol buildingTheft of government property

A judge will rule Thursday on travel restrictions for Richard Barnett, a Gravette, Arkansas, man implicated in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol during electoral ballot counting.

An attorney for Barnett filed a request asking that he be allowed to travel more than 50 miles from his home. He wants the radius extended.

“Specifically, each time Mr. Barnett needs to travel more than 50 miles for work, he needs to get clearance from the court. We feel that is unduly burdensome,” said Joseph McBride, Barnett’s lead defense attorney.

In a Tuesday morning hearing, the attorney said Barnett needs to travel for work so he can pay his bills and provide for his family. Barnett buys and sells cars and wants to travel to Petit Jean for work. That’s about a 200-mile drive from Gravette.

“We hope that Judge Cooper sides with us in granting Mr. Barnett the ability to make ends meet and provide for his defense and his family while out on bail,” said McBride.

40/29 News also reached out to the Federal Prosecuting Attorney but did not get a comment or interview.

Barnett’s next status hearing is set for August 24th.

Barnett was photographed with his feet up on a desk in Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office during the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. He also took an envelope from her office.

A federal judge granted Barnett bail in April, under the following conditions:

  • Home detention
  • Location monitoring
  • Cannot possess firearms or other weapons
  • Passport revoked and not allowed to get a new one
  • No travel outside of a 50-mile radius
  • No associating with anyone from the Jan. 6 insurrection

The judge cited a lack of criminal history and an absence of evidence proving Barnett would be a danger to the public after release as reasons to set bail.

Earlier this year, a federal grand jury indicted Barnett on eight charges:

  • Obstruction of an official proceeding
  • Aiding and abetting
  • Entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon
  • Disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon
  • Entering and remaining in certain rooms in the Capitol building
  • Disorderly conduct in a Capitol building
  • Parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building
  • Theft of government property



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