Covid travel restrictions: where you can and can’t go within Australia – and to New Zealand | Australia news


As families prepare for winter school holidays, Covid outbreaks have once again raised the spectre of state border restrictions and flight cancellations.

State and territory health authorities are monitoring the cases and the situation is changing daily. Here is a state-by-state breakdown of where you can and can’t travel and what you need to do before you leave home.

Queensland

The following local government areas of New South Wales have been declared a Covid hotspot: City of Sydney; Woollahra; Bayside; Canada Bay; Inner West; Randwick.

This means from 1am, Thursday 24 June people who live in or have visited these areas are barred from entering the state, unless they are granted a special exemption.

People who live or have visited Waverley council area in Sydney’s eastern suburbs, are already barred from entering Queensland, following the government’s decision to declare the area a Covid hotspot.

Greater Melbourne is also still a Covid hotspot, which means anyone who has been in the city in the previous 14 days will not be allowed to enter the state, except for a limited number of people deemed to be travelling for “essential purposes”. However, authorities have announced plans to lift the ban on Melbourne travellers at 1am on Friday.

If you are a Queensland resident returning from a hotspot, you will need to quarantine for 14 days at your own expense.

Everyone else will need to complete a travel declaration form up to three days prior to arrival to enter the state.

Western Australia

Every state and territory except Victoria is currently deemed “very low risk” by Western Australia’s government, which means there are no quarantine measures for anyone arriving from those states and territories.

Arrivals will still have to complete the mandatory G2G pass registration and declaration, as well as completing a health screening on arrival.

Travellers arriving from Victoria will need to quarantine for 14 days, either at a suitable premise or at a government-approved quarantine facility, which arrivals will need to pay for. Victorian travellers will also need to complete the G2G pass registration and declaration.

People who arrive in Western Australia from New South Wales must get tested for Covid-19 on arrival or within 48 hours and self-quarantine until a negative result is returned. They must wear a mask when in transit to their premises or to get a Covid-19 test.

Anyone that has been to an exposure site is barred from entering the state. WA premier Mark McGowan said on Thursday authorities were carefully monitoring the situation and would reimpose a hard border if deemed necessary.

New South Wales

Arrivals to NSW – except those from Victoria – do not require a permit.

Travellers from Victoria will need to complete a travel declaration within 24 hours immediately before you enter NSW, or on entry. Anyone who has been to a venue of high concern (listed here) must follow testing and self isolation requirements.

Australian Capital Territory

Anyone arriving from NSW or Queensland must check the close contact and casual contact exposure locations (listed here). Anyone who has visited a close contact exposure location cannot enter the ACT without an exemption. Anyone who has visited a casual contact location must complete a self-declaration form, and isolate until a negative test result.

Anyone arriving from Victoria must complete a declaration form within 24 hours prior to arriving, and follow the same rules on casual and close contact exposure locations as NSW and Queensland.

Travellers from all other states and jurisdictions can travel freely to the ACT.

Victoria

All travellers from anywhere in Australia must apply for a permit to enter Victoria.

The NSW local government areas of City of Sydney, Waverley, Woollahra, Bayside, Canada Bay, Inner West and Randwick have been declared ‘red zones’, meaning these residents are effectively banned from entering the state.

Anyone arriving from other parts of Sydney must also self-quarantine, get a Covid-19 test within 72 hours of arrival and remain in self-quarantine until a negative test result is received.

South Australia

South Australia on Sunday joined Queensland and imposed an immediate ban on travellers who have been in Sydney’s Waverley Council area. Travellers from elsewhere in NSW, who have attended a Covid case location at the specified date and time on the NSW government’s website are not permitted into the state.

South Australian residents or anyone escaping domestic violence can enter, but will still need to self-quarantine for a fortnight.

People from greater Melbourne are not permitted to enter SA at all until 12.01am on Friday when the border restriction is set to lift. People from regional Victoria must get a Covid test on day one and must self-quarantine until a negative result is received.

All travellers coming to South Australia must complete the Cross Border Travel Registration form prior to their trip.

Northern Territory

All interstate arrivals to the Northern Territory must fill in a border entry form.

The Territory declared the Woollahra and Waverley local government areas in NSW Covid-19 hotspots, meaning visitors from there will need to go into quarantine for 14 days.

Anyone deemed a close contact by the NSW government must undertake 14 days of quarantine in their home or at a suitable place. Any casual contacts must isolate, get a Covid-19 test and remain in self-quarantine until a negative test is returned. The same directions apply to those coming from Queensland.

As of 6pm Monday 21 June, travellers from greater Melbourne no longer need to go into quarantine.

Tasmania

As with other states and territories, all arrivals into Tasmania must provide their contact and travel details before entering the state.

From 12.01am Tuesday, a ban on people travelling from metropolitan Melbourne will be lifted, with the city downgraded to low risk.

Anyone who has been to an exposure site in Victoria, NSW, ACT and Queensland are not permitted to enter the state.

New Zealand

From Wednesday, tourists and visitors from Victoria will be welcome back in New Zealand.

However, NZ has suspended quarantine-free travel with NSW for an initial 72 hours from midnight Tuesday NZT.

People who have visited an exposure site in any state are also barred from travelling to New Zealand within 14 days of visiting that site.



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Finland eases travel restrictions from EU, Schengen area – Xinhua


People arrive at the Helsinki Airport, Finland, on June 21, 2021. From June 21, Finland allows travel by sea, land and air from the EU and Schengen area, if the traveler has proof of a completed COVID-19 vaccination at least two weeks earlier, or proof of having recovered from the COVID-19 infection within the last six months. (Photo by Matti Matikainen/Xinhua) 



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Some international travel restrictions easing July 5 for fully vaccinated people with proof


Fully vaccinated Canadians and permanent residents will be able to enter Canada without undergoing quarantine starting the night of July 5, the federal government announced today.

The news comes as many Canadian provinces have hit key vaccination targets, with more than 75 per cent of eligible Canadians having received at least one dose and over 20 per cent having received two.

Canadians and permanent residents who are fully vaccinated won’t be able to simply walk through customs, however.

According to officials at a government briefing for journalists, those entering will need to show documents proving they received doses of vaccines approved in Canada at least 14 days prior to entering the country.

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Officials said travellers must electronically submit COVID-19-related information to the government’s ArriveCAN app before arriving, meet the pre- and on-arrival test requirements, be asymptomatic and have a suitable quarantine plan.

“Final determination regarding exemptions is made by a government representative at the border based on the information presented at the time of entry into Canada, which is why a quarantine plan is still required,” said a government media statement.

If approved, those accepted travellers will not have to quarantine. Those arriving by air will also not be forced to stay at a government-authorized hotel and non-vaccinated children or dependent adults travelling with them will also be exempt from the hotel stay.

Children who aren’t vaccinated will be able to go home with their parents, but must quarantine for two weeks, said an official speaking on background.

WATCH | Fully vaccinated Canadians do not need to quarantine starting July 5

Public Safety Minister Bill Blair said fully vaccinated Canadians do not need to quarantine when re-entering the country starting July 5. They will need to provide proof of vaccination. 2:48

There are no changes to border restrictions for travellers who are not fully vaccinated. Those who land by air will still have to stay in hotel quarantine for up to three days pending a negative arrival test, quarantine at home for the remainder of the 14-day period and take a test on day eight of their self-isolation period.

Canadians still advised to avoid non-essential travel

The easing also does not apply to foreign nationals. Ottawa announced Friday it would be continuing existing restrictions at the Canada-U.S. border for at least another month, until July 21.

“At this time, the Government of Canada continues to strongly advise Canadians to avoid non-essential travel,” said Public Safety Minister Bill Blair.

“Although the future is looking brighter than it has for a long time, with COVID-19 cases on a downward trend and vaccination efforts going well across the country, we can’t let our guard down.”

Maryscott Greenwood, CEO of the Canada America Business Council, said she’s frustrated by the federal government’s rationale for not allowing fully-vaccinated U.S. citizens into the country.

“What’s the difference between fully vaccinated Canadians and fully vaccinated Americans? Unless you work for the NHL, in which case I guess there’s a special exemption,” she said.

“It’s frustrating, not only to Americans but to Canadian businesses that we work with on a daily basis. We need to get back into a place where we’re able to do business in a safe way and Canada is, for reasons that are really puzzling to us, quite reluctant.”

Health Minister Patty Hajdu said she’s still consulting with provinces about the next phase of easing travel restrictions.

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Goldy Hyder, president and CEO of the Business Council of Canada, said the government should have a clear plan for opening international travel.

“A transparent plan with clear benchmarks to reopen travel would be a powerful tool for encouraging Canadians to get fully vaccinated. The Council is disappointed that the government hasn’t seen fit to tell Canadians what they can look forward to as the vaccination campaign rolls on,” he said in a statement.

“I’m disappointed, too, that the light at the end of the tunnel is still a long ways off for Canada’s battered travel, tourism and hospitality sectors.”

The new rules kick in July 5 at 11:59 p.m. ET.

Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino also announced that individuals approved for permanent residence may travel to Canada as of June 21. Previously, foreign nationals who held a valid confirmation of permanent residence issued on or before March 18, 2020, were exempt from Canada’s travel restrictions.


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Travel news latest: ‘Encouraging’ signs that UK will ease travel restrictions


Holidays to Amber-listed destinations will be back on from the end of July, under plans to be considered by ministers as early as this week.

It comes as official data revealed government scientists found no evidence of Covid variants in more than 23,000 people tested after arriving from amber list countries – including some in Europe.

Fully vaccinated adults will be allowed to travel to amber countries with their children without having to quarantine under the plans being drawn up by Department for Transport (DfT) officials. Travellers will still face tests to screen for Covid and its variants.

The move would open up popular European holiday destinations to families that are currently amber including Spain, Greece, France and Portugal although ministers are not expected to introduce any changes until August.

Charles Hymas has the full story.





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US extends travel restrictions at Canada, Mexico land borders through July 21


U.S. land borders with Canada and Mexico will remain closed to non-essential travel until at least July 21, the U.S. Homeland Security Department said on Sunday.

The 30-day extension came after Canada announced its own extension on Friday of the requirements that were set to expire on Monday and have been in place since March 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The U.S. government held working-group meetings with Canada and Mexico on the travel restrictions last week and plans to hold meetings about every two weeks, U.S. officials told Reuters.

ROYAL CARIBBEAN IMPOSED RESTRICTIONS ON UNVACCINATED PASSENGERS: REPORT

Homeland Security said in a statement it noted “positive developments in recent weeks and is participating with other U.S. agencies in the White House’s expert working groups with Canada and Mexico to identify the conditions under which restrictions may be eased safely and sustainably.”

Some U.S. lawmakers and border communities that have been hit hard by the restrictions have pushed to relax them ahead of the busy summer travel season.

Canada is also under pressure from companies and the tourism industry to ease the ban, which was imposed to help contain the spread of the coronavirus and has been renewed on a monthly basis since March 2020.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stood firm, saying last week the border would stay largely shut until 75% of Canadians had received the first of a two-dose coronavirus vaccine and 20% had been given both shots.

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In talks between the United States and Canada last week, the U.S. government did not endorse setting a specific threshold to trigger lifting the restrictions, a person briefed on the talks said.

“The inability of the U.S. and Canadian governments to reach an agreement on alleviating border restrictions … is simply unacceptable,” Democratic Representative Brian Higgins and Republican Representative Bill Huizenga, co-chairs of the Canada-U.S. Interparliamentary Group said on Friday.

The United States is also holding working-group meetings on relaxing travel restrictions with the UK and the European Union, but U.S. and airline officials said previously they did not expect the Biden administration to lift the restrictions until around July 4 at the earliest.



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Covid travel restrictions: where you can and can’t go within Australia | Australia news


As families prepare for winter school holidays, Covid outbreaks have once again raised the spectre of state border restrictions and flight cancellations.

State and territory health authorities are monitoring the cases and the situation is changing daily. Here is a state-by-state breakdown of where you can and can’t travel and what you need to do before you leave home.

Queensland

From 1am Saturday, people who live or have visited Waverley council area in Sydney’s eastern suburbs, are barred from entering Queensland, following the government’s decision to declare the area a Covid hotspot.

Greater Melbourne is also still a Covid hotspot, which means anyone who has been in the city in the previous 14 days will not be allowed to enter the state, except for a limited number of people deemed to be travelling for “essential purposes”.

If you are a Queensland resident returning from a hotspot, you will need to quarantine for 14 days at your own expense.

Everyone else will need to complete a travel declaration form up to three days prior to arrival to enter the state.

Western Australia

Every state and territory except Victoria is currently deemed “very low risk” by Western Australia’s government, which means there are no quarantine measures for anyone arriving from those states and territories.

Arrivals will still have to complete the mandatory G2G pass registration and declaration, as well as completing a health screening on arrival.

Travellers arriving from Victoria will need to quarantine for 14 days, either at a suitable premise or at a government-approved quarantine facility, which arrivals will need to pay for. Victorian travellers will also need to complete the G2G pass registration and declaration.

Despite the outbreak in Sydney’s eastern suburbs, New South Wales’s status has not changed and Sydney residents are free to travel to WA. However, anyone that has been to an exposure site is barred from entering the state. WA premier Mark McGowan said on Thursday authorities were carefully monitoring the situation and would reimpose a hard border if deemed necessary.

New South Wales

Arrivals to NSW – except those from Victoria – do not require a permit.

Travellers from Victoria will need to complete a travel declaration within 24 hours immediately before you enter NSW, or on entry. Anyone who has been to a venue of high concern (listed here) must follow testing and self isolation requirements.

Australian Capital Territory

Anyone arriving from NSW or Queensland must check the close contact and casual contact exposure locations (listed here). Anyone who has visited a close contact exposure location cannot enter the ACT without an exemption. Anyone who has visited a casual contact location must complete a self-declaration form, and isolate until a negative test result.

Anyone arriving from Victoria must complete a declaration form within 24 hours prior to arriving, and follow the same rules on casual and close contact exposure locations as NSW and Queensland.

Travellers from all other states and jurisdictions can travel freely to the ACT.

Victoria

All travellers from anywhere in Australia must apply for a permit to enter Victoria.

Anyone arriving from Sydney must also self-quarantine, get a Covid-19 test within 72 hours of arrival and remain in self-quarantine until a negative test result is received.

South Australia

South Australia on Sunday joined Queensland and imposed an immediate ban on travellers who have been in Sydney’s Waverley Council area. Travellers from elsewhere in NSW, who have attended a Covid case location at the specified date and time on the NSW government’s website are not permitted into the state.

South Australian residents or anyone escaping domestic violence can enter, but will still need to self-quarantine for a fortnight.

All travellers coming to South Australia must complete the Cross Border Travel Registration form prior to their trip.

People from greater Melbourne are not permitted to enter SA at all, while people from regional Victoria must get a Covid test on day one and must self-quarantine until a negative result is received.

Northern Territory

All interstate arrivals to the Northern Territory must fill in a border entry form.

Anyone deemed a close contact by the NSW government must undertake 14 days of quarantine in their home or at a suitable place. Any casual contacts must isolate, get a Covid-19 test and remain in self-quarantine until a negative test is returned. The same directions apply to those coming from Queensland.

Travellers from greater Melbourne must undertake 14 days of mandatory, supervised quarantine at the Howard Springs quarantine facility.

Tasmania

As with other states and territories, all arrivals into Tasmania must provide their contact and travel details before entering the state.

Anyone who has been in metropolitan Melbourne in the previous 14 days will not be allowed in the state, but those from regional Victoria are free to travel to Tasmania.

Anyone who has been to an exposure site in NSW, ACT and Queensland are not permitted to enter the state.



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Canada to announce easing of some travel restrictions after passing vaccination threshold


The federal government is set to announce Monday the loosening of some border restrictions for fully vaccinated Canadians and permanent residents but says “the finish line” won’t come until there are significantly increased vaccination rates in Canada.

The changes to the border restrictions will be limited to a few measures, with all non-essential travel still discouraged, Public Safety Minister Bill Blair told CBC chief political correspondent Rosemary Barton in an interview that aired Sunday on Rosemary Barton Live.

There would be “changes with respect to the government-assisted hotels, perhaps some implication on who would be subject to quarantine, what it means to be a fully vaccinated traveller and what changes can now be accommodated for those people who are, in fact, fully vaccinated,” Blair said.

Ottawa announced Friday it would be continuing existing restrictions at the Canada-U.S. border for at least another month, until July 21, but that changes would be coming on Monday for fully vaccinated Canadians and permanent residents.

The shift in policy at the border comes as many Canadian provinces have hit key vaccination targets — with more than 75 per cent of eligible Canadians receiving at least one dose, and over 20 per cent receiving two.

The Rainbow Bridge spans the Niagara River and connects Niagara Falls, N.Y., left, to Niagara Falls, Ont. Restrictions on non-essential travel were extended Friday for another month, but some easing of restrictions for fully vaccinated Canadians and permanent residents is set to be announced by Ottawa on Monday. (Jeffrey T. Barnes/The Associated Press)

  • Have a coronavirus question or news tip for CBC News? Email: Covid@cbc.ca or join us live in the comments now.

Pressure from both sides of the border

Mayors of Canadian border cities have loudly and frequently called for more clarity from the federal government.

Sarnia Mayor Mike Bradley told Barton he believed the extension of restrictions to late July made sense but that better communication is needed.

“So far, all we get is leaks of information. We want to see a clear plan and a crisp plan that’s understandable to Canadians,” he said.

Bradley added that he had long felt fully vaccinated travellers should be able to more easily cross the border but that “it could all go off the rails with the [COVID-19] variant. I hope that doesn’t happen. People are tired, people are cranky. They want to get back to our normal life. And I’m hoping with the double vaccination, that will be the ticket to do so.”

Meanwhile, elected officials in the United States reacted harshly to the news on Friday of the extended border measures.

“I wish there was a more artful way to say this — but this is bullshit,” said Rep. Brian Higgins, a Democratic congressman whose Buffalo, N.Y., district touches the border.

Blair said the government was “working cautiously but steadily toward a phased reopening.”

But the public safety minister warned that Canada wouldn’t reach “the finish line” until about 75 per cent of eligible Canadians are fully vaccinated.

That’s the number the Public Health Agency of Canada has cited as the point at which major restrictions, such as those on indoor gatherings outside of households, could be safely lifted and at which Blair said more “changes are possible” at the border. He did not specify what those changes would be.

Blair also reiterated that the government was remaining cautious and monitoring the situation around variants of concern when considering changes to border policy. Government officials have said border measures will respond to changing epidemiological circumstances.

“We’re moving toward those targets and we’re making changes, I think, appropriate to the level of vaccination that’s currently in place,” he said.

“We’ve hit an important benchmark, but we haven’t reached the finish line.”

More travellers expected after rule change

Blair told Barton that he expects the changes in rules for fully vaccinated travellers would impact the number of people coming to Canada and that he has been working with PHAC and border services to ensure there was appropriate capacity.

“I’m absolutely certain it’s going to have an impact on traveller volumes,” Blair said, adding that there were likely many Canadians thinking of travelling to the United States to take care of property.

To determine whether travellers returning to Canada are fully vaccinated, Blair reiterated the government was co-ordinating with international partners, including the U.S. and European countries, on a vaccine verification system for international travel.

“We’re working with our global partners, particularly with the United States, in the development of the vaccine certification system that will be very efficient and be able to gain access and utilize appropriately — and with appropriate personal privacy concerns accommodated within it.”

But as an “interim” measure, Blair said the ArriveCAN app — currently in use at the border  — would be modified to enable it to accept vaccine verification documents.

“We believe this app is going to help us accommodate the inevitable increase in traveller volumes,” he said.

You can watch full episodes of Rosemary Barton Live on CBC Gem, the CBC’s streaming service.


Have questions about this story? We’re answering as many as we can in the comments.


 





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COVID-19: Travel restrictions are a ‘trade-off’ and holidays as normal this summer ‘was never going to be the case’, says justice secretary | UK News


Foreign holidays as normal this summer “was never going to be the case”, Justice Secretary Robert Buckland has said as he defended the government’s COVID travel policy.

Mr Buckland said “significant trade-offs” have had to be made to ensure COVID cases are kept down, with international travel restricted to “prevent inadvertent spread of new variants of concern”.

It follows criticism by pilots of the “ludicrously cautious” travel restrictions which they say has caused the UK’s aviation industry to be “the hardest hit in Europe”.

Heathrow Airport has been much quieter than usual due to the pandemic
Image:
Heathrow Airport has been much quieter than usual due to the pandemic

Speaking to Sky’s Trevor Phillips on Sunday, Mr Buckland said ministers will continue to be “guided by the evidence” when it comes to travelling abroad.

“Inevitably, in a situation as unprecedented and demanding as this, there are going to have to be significant trade-offs and it’s clear that holidays as normal – or travel as normal – was never going to be the case, bearing in mind the rise of particular variants, most notably the Delta variant,” the justice secretary said.

“Throughout this crisis we’ve tried to strike the right balance between the natural need in some cases for international travel but also the imperative of making sure that we do everything we can at home to contain and prevent inadvertent spread of new variants of concern.

“This is a hugely difficult situation – I think of omelettes and eggs, I’m afraid – but we are doing our very best to maintain that balance with regular reviews of the regulations to allow the maximum flexibility.”

He added: “We’re not standing still on these matters and that will continue guided by the evidence we have.”

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Robert Buckland said international holidays were ‘never going to be the case’

It comes as the British Airline Pilots’ Association (BALPA) accused ministers of appearing to “deliberately attack” the sector with the measures they have imposed during the pandemic.

The union is calling on the government to “get its act together” and open “the US routes and European holiday travel destinations” it has blocked with “no published evidence”.

BALPA members will join colleagues from across the aviation and travel industry as part of a nationwide Travel Day of Action on Wednesday, which is designed to put pressure on the UK government to support a “safe return to international travel in time for the peak summer period”.

The union’s analysis of official European air traffic data for June showed that the number of flights into and out of the UK has fallen by three-quarters compared with 2019.

The union said its study showed that Gatwick and Manchester airports were the worst affected in Europe, with Heathrow and Stansted close behind.

BALPA claims figures from the International Air Transport Association world trade body show 860,000 jobs have been lost, or are on furlough and are at risk of being lost, in UK aviation travel and tourism.

Pilots are calling for urgent action from the government
Image:
Pilots are calling for urgent action from the government

Brian Strutton, the union’s general secretary, said: “It’s official. The UK aviation industry is the hardest hit in Europe, caused by the UK government’s ludicrously cautious restrictions on international travel.

“Hapless ministers give all the appearance of deliberately attacking aviation and tormenting the public with their mixed messages over summer holidays.

“BALPA is demanding that the UK government gets its act together and opens the US routes and European holiday travel destinations that it has blocked with no published evidence at all.

“If the country is going to build back better from the pandemic and build new international links with partners for trade and travel, we are going to need a thriving aviation industry. There is no time to hide behind taskforces and reviews.”

Wednesday’s “day of action” is designed to put pressure on the UK government to support a “safe return to international travel in time for the peak summer period”.

Gatwick is said t be one of the worst affected airports in Europe
Image:
Gatwick is said to be one of the worst affected airports in Europe

The aviation and travel industries want the government to increase the number of countries on the green list while keeping a “strong red list to guard against variants”.

They also want the government to bring forward a package of tailored financial support, including an extension of furlough support, for those working in the sector who may need it.

Those taking part in the day of action are urged to take the message to their MP.

Pilots will also join action at Heathrow, Bristol, Edinburgh and Manchester airports.

A government spokesman said: “We recognise the challenging times facing all sectors of transport as a result of COVID-19, which is why we have put in place an economy-wide support package, including around £7bn of support expected to benefit the air transport sector by September 2021.

“We continue to work with the aviation sector to help them navigate this period, and encourage them to draw on the unprecedented package of support measures available.”



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EU Travel Restrictions; New Mexico, Michigan Lifts Restrictions




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Canada extends Covid-19 travel restrictions with US until July 21 


A mobile testing center is seen on May 25 in Bolton, England, an area of the UK where the Covid-19 variant first identified in India has been detected.
A mobile testing center is seen on May 25 in Bolton, England, an area of the UK where the Covid-19 variant first identified in India has been detected. Peter Byrne/PA Images/Getty Images

The Covid-19 Delta variant, which is also known as B1.617.2 and was first identified in India, accounts for 99% of new coronavirus cases in the UK, according to the latest data from Public Health England (PHE).

At least 33,630 cases of the Delta variant were identified in the week to 14 June, bringing the UK’s total number of cases of the variant to 75,953, PHE said on Friday.

As of Monday, a total of 806 people have been hospitalized with the Delta variant, an increase of 423 since last week, the report said.

The new data suggests that both the Oxford Astra/Zeneca and Pfizer/BioNTech coronavirus vaccines are about 75 percent effective in preventing hospitalization from the Delta variant after a single dose and 94% effective after two doses.

Dr. Jenny Harries, Chief Executive of the UK Health Security Agency, warned on Friday that cases of the Delta variant were “rising rapidly” in the UK and that the variant is now “dominant.”

“The increase is primarily in younger age groups, a large proportion of which were unvaccinated but are now being invited to receive the vaccine,” she added. 

##Variants## 



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