77% of travelers want to travel in the next year, with Europe reigning as top destination, according to new traveler research commissioned by Amadeus


LONDON–()–The survey of 9,074 consumers across France, Germany, India, Spain, Russia, Singapore, the UAE, the UK, and the US shows the appetite to travel is high. At the same time, it reveals that greater clarity on restrictions and guidelines will be key to unlocking increased traveler confidence. Over a third (35%) of travelers said the current international guidelines around where and how to travel are confusing, making them less likely to book business and/or leisure travel.

At the same time, travelers are exhibiting increased openness to embrace technology and a willingness to share health data so they can start traveling again.

When asked about the receptiveness to share personal health data, the survey results show:

  • 93% of travelers would be willing to provide personal data for the effective use of digital health passports or certificates, a slight increase from 91% in February 2021
  • Almost half (48%) of business travelers would be willing to provide their health data to visit a conference or event, while 36% of leisure travelers would be willing to for an excursion or activity at destination.

When asked which technology would increase confidence to travel in the next 12 months, mobile solutions continue to be the most popular, with the top technologies including:

  • Mobile applications that provide on-trip notifications and alerts (44%)
  • Self-service check-in (41%)
  • Contactless mobile payments (e.g., Apple or Google Pay, Paypal, Venmo) (41%)
  • Automated and flexible cancellation policies (40%)

Mobile applications and contactless technology have remained top technologies across all three studies, with the addition of automated and flexible cancellation policies in this final instalment.

The research is the third in a series of traveler sentiment surveys, where Amadeus takes a regular checkpoint on traveler sentiment and concerns to help the industry rebuild travel in the most effective way. Both the 2020 Rethink Travel survey (Sept 2020) and Rebuild Travel Digital Health (Feb 2021) survey revealed how technology can help to increase traveler confidence and Amadeus revisited this question to see how traveler confidence has changed since September 2020. 97% of travelers now say that technology will increase their confidence to travel, up from 91% in February 2021 and 84% in September 2020, showing a growing sense of traveler confidence in technology.

When considering the future of travel and sustainability, the survey highlighted what solutions travelers believe might help the industry to become more sustainable long-term. The results showed:

  • Nearly half (46%) of travelers said greater availability of green modes of transport, e.g., electric planes or trains
  • A similar percentage (44%) believe making sustainable travel more cost effective would be beneficial
  • 41% say transparency around travel companies’ sustainability policies would help.

Although receptiveness to travel in the next year is high, the travel industry needs to consider how to respond to changing traveler concerns as the travel environment continues to adapt. The three main concerns travelers have, are:

  • Fears of catching COVID-19 while traveling (41%)
  • Self-isolation or quarantine before and after travel (41%)
  • Changing restrictions resulting in last minute cancellations (37%)

In comparison to the previous studies, fears of catching the virus maintain a top concern for travelers, alongside self-isolation, or quarantine.

Decius Valmorbida, President, Travel, Amadeus, says, “The travel industry still faces many challenges in light of COVID-19, but we are seeing positive steps taken as restrictions lift and developments in digital health certificates continue around the world. This research demonstrates the appetite to travel continues to grow, and that travelers are looking forward to advancements in areas such as touchless technology, digital health and sustainable travel. Now is the time to listen even more closely to travelers’ needs so we can rebuild our industry in a way that is more traveler focused, resilient and sustainable.”

Francisco Pérez-Lozao Rüter, President, Hospitality, Amadeus, comments, “This three-part series of research has highlighted the essential role that both technology and data have to play in the recovery of our industry and increasing traveler confidence. In hospitality specifically we are seeing how our hotel customers are implementing solutions that complement and streamline experiences without losing the human touch while using data to better prepare for guest demands. At Amadeus we are committed to rebuilding a better industry and working closely with our customers to provide the tools to achieve this.”

To learn more about the results of the survey, read our global report here: https://amadeus.com/en/insights/themes/rebuild-travel



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UArizona Research Project to Monitor Health of SpaceX Inspiration4 Crew Members


College of Medicine – Phoenix

Today

zenhausern and colleagues
From left to right: Frederic Zenhausern with Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine researchers Jerome Lacombe, Ali Fattahi, Jian Gu; Kaitlyn Janssen, an Arizona State University undergraduate student studying biomedical engineering; Jasmine Devadhasan; and Alexander Summers.

Space flight is not just for astronauts and rocket scientists anymore. SpaceX Inspiration4, the world’s first all-civilian mission, will make the dream of orbiting Earth come true for a crew of civilians on Sept. 15. Researchers with the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, led by center director Frederic Zenhausern, will provide the first in-flight testing of multiple biomarkers of stress, inflammation and immunity measured in a zero-gravity environment to monitor the health of the four-member crew.  

The essential task of protecting humans from exposure to hazards is critical to the prospect of future deep space exploration. Zenhausern and his team developed a novel technology that will monitor crew members’ stress, inflammation and immune levels during space flight through a blood droplet from a fingerstick or a saliva sample.

“Our development of advanced molecular diagnostics for multipurpose indications of emerging infectious diseases, health performance or risks of environmental exposure must benefit all populations where possible,” Zenhausern said. “This Inspiration4 mission shares some operational requirements similar to a consumer health product to be performed at home or in low-resources settings, which must be easy to use, minimally invasive, rapid and low cost.”

VeriFAST device
A VeriFAST device.

The Vertical Integrated Flow Assay System Technology, known as VeriFAST, uses blood or saliva deposited onto a device to perform rapid assessments of physiological or molecular effects on humans. The system provides precise measurements, including multiplex molecular diagnostics, to detect possible radiation exposure. The devices have nanoporous membranes printed with arrays of reagents arranged in rows. When the assessments are completed, the spots in the array change color, providing visual results within minutes.

Zenhausern and his team designed the VeriFAST platform to assess a full range of biomarkers, from proteins to genes. While the Inspiration4 mission will take less than a week to complete, it will provide a unique opportunity to apply the VeriFAST platform to help researchers study the molecular and physiological levels in the human body under extreme zero-gravity conditions. One of the biomarkers measured by VeriFAST is the C-reactive protein. The level of that protein in blood has long been used as a diagnostic marker of inflammatory response, including the response occurring in cancer. This biomedical data will offer valuable insights and help inform the measures necessary to protect future astronaut crews in orbit during longer missions.

Zero gravity, confinement and radiation experienced during space flight can have significant health consequences. Space radiation is risky to the human body, potentially causing damage to the DNA in cells. Radiation exposure may occur during deep-space missions and can increase the risk of long-term health consequences such as cancer. Adverse effects to the central nervous and cardiovascular systems may also occur.  It is difficult to determine remotely the health consequences on the tissues and cells of crew members.

“As civilian space travel becomes more frequent and accessible, the university is well positioned to lead in the important, emerging field of aerospace biomedicine,” said Elizabeth “Betsy” Cantwell, the university’s senior vice president for research and innovation. “The new knowledge Dr. Zenhausern’s group will create through SpaceX Inspiration4 is really the tip of the iceberg toward a better understanding of in-flight health.”

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health, known as TRISH, funded the project, which is part of a research complement to be conducted during the multi-day journey. The Inspiration4 crew, commanded by Jared Isaacman, founder and CEO of Shift4 Payments, will contribute to the space biomedical community by participating in important scientific research during the mission. Inspiration4’s goal is to inspire humanity and to advance cancer research through collaboration with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

If the VeriFAST platform is validated by the Inspiration4 crew, it could provide a valuable blood and saliva analysis system to support the health and performance of future space crews. The biomedical samples collected during the Inspiration4 mission will become part of a biobank used for future collaborations by research teams at SpaceX, TRISH and the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix.

“Innovation and problem solving to improve health are at the core of what we do. That impact has been felt in Arizona, around the world and now for those in space,” said Dr. Guy Reed, dean of the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix. “This collaboration with TRISH, SpaceX and the ANBM Center creates synergies that will help to protect humans against radiation injury and other hazards that they encounter during space travel. It will fuel the development of new therapies and preventive strategies for crew members and patients here on Earth and beyond.”

A version of this article originally appeared on the College of Medicine – Phoenix website: https://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/spacex



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UArizona Research Project to Monitor Health of SpaceX Inspiration4 Crew Members During Mission


College Researchers Designed Novel Molecular Diagnostics Technology to Monitor the Health of Four Crew Members during First All-Civilian Mission to Orbit

SpaceX Inspiration4 LogoSpace flight is not just for astronauts and rocket scientists anymore. SpaceX Inspiration4, the world’s first all-civilian mission, will make the dream of orbiting the Earth come true for a crew of civilians September 15. Researchers with the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, led by Frederic Zenhausern, PhD, MBA, will provide the first in-flight testing of multiple biomarkers of stress, inflammation and immunity measured in a zero gravity environment to monitor the health of the four-member crew.

The essential task of protecting humans from exposure to these hazards is critical to the prospect of future deep space exploration. Dr. Zenhausern and his team developed a novel technology that will monitor crew members’ response to measure stress, inflammation and immune levels during space flight through a blood droplet from a simple fingerstick or a saliva sample.

“Our development of advanced molecular diagnostics for multi-purpose indications of emerging infectious diseases, health performance or risks of environmental exposure must benefit all populations where possible,” said Dr. Zenhausern, director of the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine. “This Inspiration4 mission shares some operational requirements similar to a consumer health product to be performed at home or in low resources settings — which must be easy to use, minimally invasive, rapid and low cost.”

The VIFAS Technology
The VIFAS Technology

The Vertical Integrated Flow Assay System (VIFAS) technology uses blood or saliva deposited onto a test strip to perform rapid assessments of radiobiological effects on humans. The system provides precise measurements, including multiplex molecular diagnostics, to possible radiation exposure. The test strips have nanoporous membranes printed with arrays of reagents arranged in rows. When the assessments are completed, the spots in the array change color providing visual results within minutes.

Zenhausern and his team designed the VIFAS technology to assess a full range of biomarkers, from proteins to genes. While the Inspiration4 mission will take less than a week to complete, it will provide a unique opportunity to apply the VIFAS technology to help researchers study the molecular and physiological levels in the human body under extreme zero gravity conditions. This biomedical data will offer valuable insights and help inform the measures necessary to protect future astronaut crews in orbit during longer missions. 

Zero gravity and radiation experienced during space flight can have significant health consequences. Space radiation is risky to the human body, potentially causing damage to the DNA in cells. Radiation exposure may occur during deep-space missions and can increase the risk of long-term health consequences, such as cancer. Adverse effects to the central nervous and cardiovascular systems may also occur. It is difficult to determine remotely the health consequences on the tissues and cells of crew members.

Ali Fattahi, PhD, Works with the VIFAS Technology
Ali Fattahi, PhD, Works with the VIFAS Technology

“As civilian space travel becomes more frequent and accessible, the university is well positioned to lead in the important, emerging field of aerospace biomedicine,” said Elizabeth “Betsy” Cantwell, PhD, the university’s senior vice president for Research and Innovation. “The new knowledge Dr. Zenhausern’s group will create through SpaceX Inspiration4 is really the tip of the iceberg toward a better understanding of in-flight health.”

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) funded the project, which is part of a research complement to be conducted during the multi-day journey. The Inspiration4 crew, commanded by Jared Isaacman, founder and CEO of Shift4 Payments, will contribute to the space biomedical community by participating in important scientific research during the mission.

If the VIFAS platform is validated by the Inspiration4 crew, it could provide a valuable blood and saliva analysis system to support the health and performance of future space crews. The biomedical samples collected during the Inspiration4 mission will become part of a biobank used for future collaborations by research teams at SpaceX, TRISH and the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix.

“Innovation and problem-solving to improve health are at the core of what we do. That impact has been felt in Arizona, around the world and now for those in space,” said Guy Reed, MD, MS, dean of the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix. “This collaboration with TRISH, SpaceX and the Center for ANBM creates synergies that will help to protect humans against radiation injury and other hazards that they encounter during space travel. It will fuel the development of new therapies and preventive strategies for crew members and patients here on Earth and beyond.”



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Revised approval process for essential research travel


NOTE: A version of this message was sent in June, and recently we learned that graduate students were inadvertently left off of the distribution list. This slightly revised message is being sent again to correct that oversight and to ensure all are informed of our revised approval process for essential research travel. We apologize for the oversight.


Dear UCSC Faculty, Researchers, and Graduate Students,

We write today to provide an update on research-related travel. We understand that some graduate students and employees of UC Santa Cruz may need to travel, particularly internationally, to enable critical research activities at a time when COVID-19 continues to present a global health risk.

The UC Office of the President has rescinded the prior travel directives and directs that all University travelers follow the CDC Guidance before, during and upon return from travel. With this change, we are updating our policies on domestic and international research travel. We urge all prospective travelers to first consult the CDC Guidance, and we want to highlight that the CDC recommends delay of travel until travelers are fully vaccinated.

At this time, travel will only be permitted for critical research activities. By definition, critical research activities meet these three criteria: (1) The travel is essential to the survival or long-term viability of significant research activity or academic work; (2) The research activity is a substantial component of the petitioner’s academic or professional work at UCSC; and (3) There are no viable alternatives to travel.

All research-related travelers, whether domestic or international, are required to review and complete the COVID-19 Research Travel Checklist provided by the EH&S Field Research Safety program. The traveler can reach out as needed to EH&S at fieldsafety@ucsc.edu to review the checklist or discuss trip-specific parameters. For group travel, the trip lead is responsible for reviewing and sharing the checklist with all trip participants.

Domestic travel: Pre-approval is no longer required for domestic travel related to critical research activities. All domestic travelers outside the state of California are required to register with the UC Travel Insurance Program. For travel inside the state of California, but greater than 100 miles from campus, registration is encouraged but not required.

International travel: As there are variable risk levels for travel to different regions of the world, pre-approval is required for all international travel.

Faculty, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and staff may request approval for essential University-related international travel for research purposes.

If your proposed travel meets the criteria for critical research activities, submit your completed request form at least 30 days prior to your proposed departure. As part of the request form, international travelers should include pertinent information from the Department of State Travel Advisories related to their destination(s). In addition, all international travelers are required to register with the UC Travel Insurance Program.

Only pre-approved travel will be eligible for reimbursement. The approved travel form will be sent to the accounting unit for your Division



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Evaluate and Track Air Travel Market | Procurement Research Report| SpendEdge | National News


NEW YORK, July 18, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — The Air Travel will grow at a CAGR of 2.41% by 2024. Prices will increase by 4%-6% during the forecast period and suppliers will have a moderate bargaining power in this market. This report offers key advisory and intelligence to help buyers identify and shortlist the most suitable suppliers for their Air Travel requirements.

Get a Free Access to All This Market’s Trends and Drivers

Air Travel Procurement report explains key category management objectives that should form the base for sourcing strategy, including:

  • Supply assurance
  • Cost savings
  • Adherence to regulatory nuances
  • Demand forecasting and governance
  • Minimalization of ad hoc purchases
  • Category innovations
  • Green initiatives
  • Top-line growth
  • Supply base rationalization
  • Scalability of inputs
  • Reduction of TCO

Sign Up for a Sample Air Travel Procurement Market Report: www.spendedge.com/report/air-travel-sourcing-and-procurement-intelligence-report

This report evaluates suppliers based on coverage of travel destinations, value-added services, transparency in pricing, and references and clientele. In addition, suppliers are also shortlisted based on business needs, technical specifications, operational requirements, security compliance, regulatory mandates, legal requirements, quality control, change management procedures, pricing models, penalty clauses, sla nuances, acceptance criteria, and evaluation criteria.

Related Reports on Logistics, Warehousing and Transportation Include:

Table of Content

  • Executive Summary
  • Market Insights
  • Category Pricing Insights
  • Cost-saving Opportunities
  • Best Practices
  • Category Ecosystem
  • Category Management Strategy
  • Category Management Enablers
  • Suppliers Selection
  • Suppliers under Coverage
  • US Market Insights
  • Category scope

About SpendEdge:

SpendEdge shares your passion for driving sourcing and procurement excellence. We are the preferred procurement market intelligence partner for 120+ Fortune 500 firms and other leading companies across numerous industries. Our strength lies in delivering robust, real-time procurement market intelligence reports and solutions.

Contact

SpendEdge

Anirban Choudhury

Marketing Manager

Ph No: +1 (872) 206-9340

https://www.spendedge.com/contact-us

Cision View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/evaluate-and-track–air-travel-market–procurement-research-report-spendedge-301335757.html

SOURCE SpendEdge





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The 2021 World Research Travel Conference was held in Haikou


HAIKOU, China, July 15, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Hainan is a famous parent-child travel destination in China, and summer holidays are the peak season for tourism in Hainan. The 2021 ”Child’ YOUNG Happy in Summer in Hainan‘ joint promotion activity was officially launched from July 14, 2021, to July 15, 2021.

As the highlight of the joint promotion activity, the 2021 (2nd) World Research Travel Conference featuring the theme of ‘Hainan-Fun and Learning Come Together- Put Hainan on Your Bookshelf’ was held grandly in Haikou, Hainan Province, China.

The 2021 World Research Travel Conference in the theme of ‘Hainan-Fun and Learning Come Together- Put Hainan on Your Bookshelf’ was held in Haikou, Hainan Province, China from July 14, 2021, to July 15, 2021.

Ng Yen Yen, former Minister of National Tourism of Malaysia, Franz Wolfgang Eder, former Director of the Geological Division of UNESCO, Long Yongtu, chief negotiator for China’s accession to WTO and former Vice Minister of Foreign Trade and Economic Cooperation, as well as experts, scholars and hundreds of industry representatives from thirteen countries and regions all over the world were invited to attend the conference online/offline.

The Conference was co-hosted by the Hainan Provincial Department of Tourism, Culture, Radio, Television, and Sports and Word Research Travel Organization (WRTO).

Taking ‘2021 World Research Travel Conference’ as the main activity, ‘Hainan-Fun and Learning Come Together- Put Hainan on Your Bookshelf’ research travel series’ promotion activities gathered experts and scholars in the research travel field, providers of research travel services, representatives from the industry bodies at home and abroad to research the development trend of global research travel. The Conference adopted offline conference + online Live Real Audio, consisting of one main conference + 2 parallel forum meetings. During the Conference, contents including ‘White Paper on Hainan Research Travel Development’, WRTO planning teaching materials, Hainan Top Ten Quality Research Travel Routines, etc. were released and the WRTO also licensed the first batch of certified research travel bases and conducted theme sharing.

The Conference also held two parallel forums i.e. ‘Research Travel Promotes Global Cross-cultural Communication And Teenagers’ Development Under the background of Free Trade Ports Forum’ and ‘Explore Ocean Culture, Innovate Future Education Forum’ which focused on the future development trend of research travel in Hainan Province, systematically analyzed the significance of research travel to the teenagers’ development under the background of free trade ports and sought for opportunities for the development of the research travel industry in Hainan Province in the future.

During the conference, two groups of guests were organized to investigate the research travel courses in Haikou and Qionghai. Guests gave comprehensive analysis to the sample research travel courses customized for Hainan by WRTO so as to share the development achievements of research travel.

SOURCE World Research Travel Organization Sichuan Representative



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The 2021 World Research Travel Conference was held in Haikou | News


HAIKOU, China, July 15, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Hainan is a famous parent-child travel destination in China, and summer holidays are the peak season for tourism in Hainan. The 2021 ”Child’ YOUNG Happy in Summer in Hainan‘ joint promotion activity was officially launched from July 14, 2021, to July 15, 2021.

As the highlight of the joint promotion activity, the 2021 (2nd) World Research Travel Conference featuring the theme of ‘Hainan-Fun and Learning Come Together- Put Hainan on Your Bookshelf’ was held grandly in Haikou, Hainan Province, China.

The 2021 World Research Travel Conference in the theme of ‘Hainan-Fun and Learning Come Together- Put Hainan on Your Bookshelf’ was held in Haikou, Hainan Province, China from July 14, 2021, to July 15, 2021.

Ng Yen Yen, former Minister of National Tourism of Malaysia, Franz Wolfgang Eder, former Director of the Geological Division of UNESCO, Long Yongtu, chief negotiator for China’s accession to WTO and former Vice Minister of Foreign Trade and Economic Cooperation, as well as experts, scholars and hundreds of industry representatives from thirteen countries and regions all over the world were invited to attend the conference online/offline.

The Conference was co-hosted by the Hainan Provincial Department of Tourism, Culture, Radio, Television, and Sports and Word Research Travel Organization (WRTO).

Taking ‘2021 World Research Travel Conference’ as the main activity, ‘Hainan-Fun and Learning Come Together- Put Hainan on Your Bookshelf’ research travel series’ promotion activities gathered experts and scholars in the research travel field, providers of research travel services, representatives from the industry bodies at home and abroad to research the development trend of global research travel. The Conference adopted offline conference + online Live Real Audio, consisting of one main conference + 2 parallel forum meetings. During the Conference, contents including ‘White Paper on Hainan Research Travel Development’, WRTO planning teaching materials, Hainan Top Ten Quality Research Travel Routines, etc. were released and the WRTO also licensed the first batch of certified research travel bases and conducted theme sharing.

The Conference also held two parallel forums i.e. ‘Research Travel Promotes Global Cross-cultural Communication And Teenagers’ Development Under the background of Free Trade Ports Forum’ and ‘Explore Ocean Culture, Innovate Future Education Forum’ which focused on the future development trend of research travel in Hainan Province, systematically analyzed the significance of research travel to the teenagers’ development under the background of free trade ports and sought for opportunities for the development of the research travel industry in Hainan Province in the future.

During the conference, two groups of guests were organized to investigate the research travel courses in Haikou and Qionghai. Guests gave comprehensive analysis to the sample research travel courses customized for Hainan by WRTO so as to share the development achievements of research travel.

 

Cision View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-2021-world-research-travel-conference-was-held-in-haikou-301335343.html

SOURCE World Research Travel Organization Sichuan Representative





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Research provides an update on how electrical impulses in the heart travel from cell to cell


The rhythm in a working heart is regulated by electrical impulses. Disturbances of this bioelectrical process can result in cardiac arrhythmias, or irregularities in heartbeat — a common ailment that can lead to illness and death.

In Biophysics Reviews, by AIP Publishing, researchers from Harvard Medical School provide a state-of-the-art update on how electrical impulses in the heart travel from cell to cell.

A functioning heart contracts to pump blood to the body and the lungs. Within the heart, a pacemaker acts as an electrical clock, sending out a signal that tells the heart when to contract. The whole muscle moves together, because each individual cell inside of it contracts in a coordinated manner and within a short time interval.

In order to do so, the initial electrical impulse, sent by the pacemaker, rapidly spreads through cells across the heart.

If one cell is excited electrically and the other is not, the excited cell becomes positively charged inside, and the resting cell is still negatively charged inside. As a consequence, a voltage gradient builds up between the cells. If you have a voltage gradient and a pathway with a low electrical resistance, a local current will flow.”


André Kléber, Author

The connections between cells forming the low resistance pathway and facilitating the current flow are called gap junctions. Each consists of many channels, which are formed when specific proteins from one cell dock and fuse to the proteins from another cell. Kléber said the fusing proteins look like placing the tips of your fingers on one hand to the fingers on the other hand.

The scientists delve into the properties of gap junctions and their constituent proteins, the so-called connexins. Kléber said one reason gap junction channels are interesting is because they are a highly dynamic system in equilibrium. The creation, or synthesis, of the channels equals the destruction.

“The turnover is very short,” he said. “On one hand, the system is very stable during your whole life. On the other hand, if you measure it, it is constantly cycling in periods of a few hours.”

The proteins found in gap junctions are important for processes not directly related to cell-cell connections, like mitochondrial function, which creates energy, and trafficking, which transports molecules from the site of synthesis to their site of action in the cell interior.

“You have to refrain from the idea that if you define the role of a protein in the body, that it has only a single function,” said Kléber. “Nature is much, much smarter than human beings.”

Source:

Journal reference:

Kléber, A.G & Jin, Q., (2021) Coupling between cardiac cells—An important determinant of electrical impulse propagation and arrhythmogenesis. Biophysics Reviews. doi.org/10.1063/5.0050192.



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Amadeus Research Shows Four Major Summer Travel Trends


Americans are traveling in new ways, and research is starting to reveal how. A new report from travel services company Amadeus shows new trends in summer travel shaping up following the COVID-19 pandemic.

The company’s airline and hospitality searches and booking and destination information reveal the new ways in which people are planning for their getaways this summer.

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Travel bubbles are becoming a major trend, and destinations that are allowing them are showing increased interest.

Amadeus’ research found that “bubble travel,” such as in the Maldives where guests and groups can travel together with a negative COVID-19 test, is popular with travelers. The company has seen a 66 percent increase in searches from around the world for two-week trips to the Maldives compared to the same period in 2019.

With more people working from home, this may be the summer of the “workcation.”

While Americans notoriously leave vacation days on the table, it’s possible that they might be more attracted to working while on vacation. Amadeus’ research found that there has been an increasing trend in online searches for longer stays, indicating potential workcations. The company also found that the Caribbean is an appealing destination for travelers who are planning a workcation, with a 43 percent increase in the number of searches for 14-plus day stays compared to the same period in 2019.

Indulgent travel sometimes referred to as “revenge travel” is seen as the ultimate cure for cabin fever.

Amadeus found that people are booking these trips to top destinations such as Cancun, which the company found had skyrocketed from being outside the top 50 most searched destinations to now number four globally.

There is also a lot of interest in returning to travel in a more environmentally friendly way.

Amadeus found that travelers are putting a lot of thought into planning their next trip when it comes to safety and being environmentally and socially conscious about their choices. Its data suggests that people are researching their trips 27 percent earlier than they did in the same period in 2019.





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Research Shows Americans Cautious but Ready To Travel


Americans are ready to travel again, but despite viral images of maskless travelers, research shows they are more likely to engage and visit places with clear COVID-19 safety protocols.

The latest Longwoods International tracking study of American travelers found that 88 percent have travel plans in the next six months. That is the highest level in more than a year.

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The research also found that less than one-third of travelers are inclined to visit a tourism attraction or a business that does not have clear COVID safety protocols such as mask requirements and social distancing.

“It’s obvious from the data that Americans are ready to travel again but only if they believe they can do safely,” said Amir Eylon, president and CEO of Longwoods International. “With many states reducing or removing coronavirus safety mandates, tourism businesses will need to figure out what level of safety precautions their customers expect or demand.”

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The Longwoods study, which was supported by Miles Partnership, also shows that Americans are still shying away from longer journeys in favor of road trips. Domestic and drive destinations are favored over international and fly-to locations.

They are also still more inclined to plan farther out. There is an increase in trips being planned more than six months out when compared with travel planning in the past month.

Only 13 percent of Americans said that they didn’t have any upcoming travel plans. Eighteen percent are traveling within the next month. Nineteen percent are taking a trip in the next one to two months, and 27 percent within the next three to five months. Twenty-three percent said they have travel planned in six months or more.

COVID-19 is still the greatest impact on whether Americans are traveling or not and how they are traveling. Thirty-three percent said the virus was greatly impacting their decisions. Just 17 percent said their decisions were greatly impacted by finances.

Thirty-two percent of American travelers said that they were choosing a drive destination rather than flying, and 31 percent said that they were traveling within the U.S. rather than internationally due to the coronavirus. Fifteen percent are traveling to rural destinations rather than cities. Only 12 percent are deciding not to travel at all due to the virus, and 10 percent said they are canceling trips.

An increasing number of Americans said that they feel safe traveling outside their community (58 percent).

Many travelers are waiting to be vaccinated before they travel (34 percent), and 20 percent are waiting until a majority of Americans are vaccinated. Thirty-nine percent said that the vaccine has no impact on their travel plans.





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