U.S. government got 4,176 complaints, 1 compliment about airline travel in June


Travelers wait in line during check in at John Wayne Airport in Santa Ana, CA on Wednesday, June 30, 2021.

Paul Bersebach | MediaNews Group | Orange County Register via Getty Images

Air travelers’ complaints to the federal government jumped nearly 18% in June from a month earlier as flight cancellations and other disruptions rose, the Department of Transportation said Friday.

The DOT received 4,176 complaints about air service in June, more than 55% of them involving refunds. It also received one compliment but did not immediately say which airline or topic it was about.

Airlines struggled with staffing shortages this summer, the result of a surge in air travel demand that exceeded their expectations. Earlier in the pandemic the airlines had urged thousands of employees to take retirement or leaves to cut costs.

Ten U.S. airlines canceled 1.6% of the 573,779 domestic flights they scheduled in June, almost four times the rate compared with May, the DOT said. The on-time rate fell to 74.6% from 86.2% a month earlier.

Hawaiian Airlines, Delta Air Lines and Alaska Airlines had the best on-time rates in June at 87.7%, 86.8% and 80.7%, respectively. Allegiant Air had the lowest on-time arrival rate of the 10 airlines at 56.6%, followed by Southwest Airlines at 62.4% and JetBlue Airways at 65.1%.

American Airlines came in fourth place in on-time arrivals at 74.3%, with Spirit Airlines at 74.1%, United Airlines at 73.9%, and Frontier Airlines at 69.5%.

Dallas-based Southwest had a pair of technology failures in June that contributed to flight cancellations and delays.

The DOT data does not cover the late July and early August meltdown at Spirit after the carrier canceled more than 2,800 flights during a spate of bad weather, technology problems and staffing shortages. American also canceled hundreds of flights in early August after bad weather at its Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport hub combined with staffing shortfalls.

Earlier this week, American said it paused plans to close down a pilot training center in Charlotte, North Carolina, because of the need for more pilots to handle the surge in travel demand.



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US road travel surged 14.5% in June


Washington DC: US ​​drivers increased by 14.5% in June. This is because rural driving has exceeded pre-COVID-19 levels and more Americans have returned to their offices or traveled for leisure.

The Federal Highway Authority said Wednesday that drivers drove 282.5 billion miles in June, 35.7 billion miles more than in June 2020, and overall travel returned to pre-pandemic levels.

In June 2019, American drivers recorded 284.5 billion miles.

For the first time since the pandemic began, rural driving exceeded pre-pandemic levels in June, while urban driving was slightly below 2019 levels.

Rural driving in June averaged 2.97 billion miles per day, up from 2.93 billion miles per day in June 2019. Meanwhile, urban driving averaged 6.45 billion miles per day, just below 6.55 billion miles per day in the same month of 2019.

During 2020, US road travel fell 13.2 percent to 2.83 trillion miles, the lowest annual total since 2001, and the current 12-month average driving average is 3 trillion miles.

The biggest surge in June was in the northeast, where mileage increased by 19.9%. This number also rose 17.5% in the west.

According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), US gasoline consumption is expected to average 8.8 million barrels per day in 2021 from 8 million barrels in 2020.

According to the EIA, gasoline consumption in the United States will be below 2019 levels throughout 2022 due to the large number of teleworkers.

US road travel surged 14.5% in June

Source link US road travel surged 14.5% in June



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Perspective | Travel Q&A: When you can visit Iceland, where to see a cannon fired and how to travel safely with your dog (June 7) – Washington Post



Perspective | Travel Q&A: When you can visit Iceland, where to see a cannon fired and how to travel safely with your dog (June 7)  Washington Post



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UPDATE 1-U.S. road travel rose 14.5% in June as motorists near pre-pandemic driving


(Adds more details, EIA forecast)

By David Shepardson

WASHINGTON, Aug 11 (Reuters) – U.S. motorists drove 14.5% more miles in June as rural driving topped pre COVID-19 levels and more Americans return to offices and leisure trips.

The Federal Highway Administration said Wednesday motorists drove 282.5 billion miles in June, up 35.7 billion miles over June 2020 as overall travel was nearly back to pre-pandemic levels. In June 2019, U.S. motorists logged 284.5 billion miles.

For the first time since the pandemic began, rural driving surpassed pre-pandemic levels in June, while urban driving remains slightly below 2019 levels.

Rural driving averaged 2.97 billion miles per day in June, up from 2.93 billion per day in June 2019, while urban driving averaged 6.45 billion miles per day, just below the 6.55 billion miles per day in the same month in 2019.

For all of 2020, U.S. road travel fell 13.2% to 2.83 trillion miles, the lowest yearly total since 2001. The current 12-month moving average is 3 trillion miles.

The biggest jump in June was in the Northeast, where miles traveled was up 19.9%. It was up 17.5% in the West.

U.S. gasoline consumption is expected to average 8.8 million barrels per day (bpd) in 2021, up from 8 million bpd in 2020, the Energy Information Administration said.

Still, the EIA added U.S. gasoline consumption will remain below 2019 levels through 2022 due to the proliferation of people working from home. (Reporting by David Shepardson Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and Jonathan Oatis)



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U.S. Road Travel Rose 14.5% in June as Motorists Near Pre-Pandemic Driving | U.S. News®


WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. motorists drove 14.5% more miles in June over COVID-19 pandemic levels in 2020 as more Americans return to offices and resume trips.

The Federal Highway Administration said Wednesday motorists drove 282.5 billion miles in June, up 35.7 billion miles over June 2020. Travel in June was nearly back to pre-pandemic levels. In June 2019, U.S. motorists logged 284.5 billion miles.

(Reporting by David Shepardson; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama)

Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters.



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business trip

Choice: June, July RevPAR Exceeds Pre-Pandemic Levels


Choice Hotels’ second-quarter domestic systemwide revenue per available room declined 1.1 percent compared with the same period in 2019, with June results exceeding 2019 levels by nearly 5 percent and July by 15 percent, said Choice president and CEO Patrick Pacious during a Thursday second-quarter earnings call.

“It’s truly a remarkable achievement,” Pacious said, adding that the company’s goal is not simply to return to 2019 performance levels, but rather to capitalize on current and future investments to fuel long-term growth.

The company’s domestic systemwide RevPAR for Q2 was $51.54, up from $26.27 in 2020. Occupancy was 62.3 percent compared with 39.1 percent for the same period last year. Average daily rate recovered to $82.72 from $67.21 one year prior. In the third quarter, July occupancy was at 70 percent, and ADR increased 10 percent over July 2019, according to the company.

Though leisure demand has been driving lodging recovery, and Choice’s, the company also has seen “continuing momentum” in business travel trends, “with additional runway for growth,” Pacious said. “We have seen sequential quarter-over-quarter and month-over-month increases in our business travel booking trends in the second quarter. Likewise, with our recent refresh of our Comfort brand and the upscale penetration, we are well-positioned to not only recover existing business travel but also expand our guest base as business travel rebounds.”

Choice’s group travel bookings reached 90 percent of 2019 levels for the first half of the year, Pacious said, with lead volumes steadily rising close to 2019 levels.

The company awarded 200 domestic franchise agreements year to date through June 30, a 32 percent increase compared with the same period of 2020. Conversion agreements increased 43 percent year to date for the same period. 

The company continued to see strength in its extended-stay portfolio, with domestic systemwide RevPAR growth of 9.9 percent for the second quarter compared with 2019. Occupancy levels for this segment reached 82 percent and ADR increased 2 percent over the same period. The WoodSpring Suites brand achieved RevPAR growth of 16 percent in the second quarter compared with the same period in 2019, driven by occupancy levels of nearly 86 percent and an increase in ADR of 5.6 percent.

Choice’s second-quarter net income increased 15 percent compared to 2019 with $85.9 million. 

RELATED: Choice Q1 earnings



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Retail spending fell in June with further dips expected


‘Just the tip of the iceberg’: Retail spending collapsed in June with economists and retailers fearing worse for the September quarter
Brook Mitchell/Getty Images
  • Retail turnover fell 1.8% in June, thanks to a collapse in discretionary spending linked to lockdown restrictions.
  • Lingering lockdowns suggest Australia’s economy is on track to fall by 2% in the September quarter, said Sarah Hunter, Chief Australia Economist for BIS Oxford Economics.
  • Spending is unlikely to bounce back unless retailers receive further government support, industry groups say.
  • Visit Business Insider Australia’s homepage for more stories.

The collapse in retail spending for June is more evidence Australia’s GDP will contract in the September quarter, economists say, as industry groups say there’s no guarantee of a spending snap-back once harsh lockdown measures are lifted.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics on Wednesday released its detailed June retail turnover data, confirming preliminary estimates of a 1.8% decline over the month to $30.59 billion.

Clothing, footwear, and personal accessories took the largest tumble, recording a fall of 9.5% over the month, followed by department store turnover, which sunk by 7%.

Cafe and restaurants also dipped by 6%, with the main outlier being food retail, which rose 1.5% from May levels.

The data reflects the impact of widespread COVID-19 lockdowns in major centres across the country, which continued to constrain movement and spending a year and a half after the pandemic first hit Australia.

Victoria recorded the sharpest declines in spending, falling 4% over the month. That downturn is linked to the state’s fourth lockdown, which started in late May and stretched through to June 8.

New South Wales recorded the second most precipitous fall, down 2%, largely due to the lockdown measures which first impacted local government areas in south-west Sydney before spreading to the entire Greater Sydney region on June 26.

Those retail sale figures are a grim portent, said Sarah Hunter, Chief Australia Economist for BIS Oxford Economics.

“As the data largely predate impact of the current restrictions in NSW and Queensland, and the snap lockdowns and ongoing restrictions in South Australia and Victoria, the near term outlook is challenging,” she said.

“Retail turnover in July is set to record a sharp drop, with only a partial recovery likely for August.”

Combined with other limitations caused by the Greater Sydney lockdown, Hunter said the national economy is slated to shrink through the September quarter.

“Together with a pronounced fall in household spending on other services (travel, personal care etc) and the pause in construction in NSW, GDP is likely to contract by around 2% in the September quarter,” she said.

Fears for an extended spending downturn were echoed by Australian Retailers Association CEO Paul Zahra, who said the June figures are “just the tip of the iceberg”, given the most recent Victorian lockdown, plus July restrictions in Western Australia, South Australia, the Northern Territory, and more recently in south-east Queensland.

In June, the Reserve Bank of Australia Assistant Governor Luci Ellis said, “timely data on spending suggest that the snap-back after the shorter lockdowns imposed in parts of Australia this year has been almost immediate.”

Zahra today indicated he had little faith in the same uptick occurring again, unless even more financial supports are provided to struggling firms.

“Without adequate support after lockdowns are lifted, it is unlikely that businesses will snap back as they have previously and we fear the worst is still to come,” Zahra said.

Despite the June downturn, the latest ABS data suggests spending grew 0.8% over the quarter, and was 2.9% higher than the same period in 2020, when Australia experienced its first tranche of hardcore lockdowns.



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Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport reports record June passenger travel | Arizona News


MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) – Air travel is officially back in business, and people are traveling more than ever. Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport has recorded the highest June passenger activity since the height of the pandemic in March 2020. More than 151,000 passengers traveled through the airport in June 2021, marking the highest June passenger total in the airport history.

It marks a significant growth period for the airport, which saw air traffic down 93% in April after setting a record for commercial passengers in 2019. In 2019, the airport saw over 1.8 million travelers, but declined as more people opted to stay home during the pandemic. An upward trend has slowly grown as more people are beginning to travel again.

Passenger numbers dropped an average 60% for the airline industry in 2020 with over $35 billion in losses at the country’s six largest airports, according to Forbes. Mesa Mayor and Chairman of the Airport Authority John Giles said that families are making up for lost travel. “June is the kickoff to the summer travel season, and we are encouraged and hopeful that this trend will continue,” said Giles.

Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport is located at 6033 S Sossaman Rd, Mesa, AZ. The airport serves Allegiant, Avelo, WestJet, Swoop, Sun Country and Flair for domestic and international flights.


Copyright 2021 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.





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STR: June U.S. Hotel Occupancy, Rates Continue Recovery


The U.S. hotel industry in June continued a recovery still led by leisure travel, with occupancy and revenue per available room each at their highest point since October 2019, according to STR. Average daily rate in June continued to improve and was the highest it has been since February 2020.

June U.S. hotel occupancy was 66.1 percent, ADR was $129, and RevPAR was $85.31. The company provided comparisons to June 2019 performance data instead of year-over-year changes because of the Covid-19 pandemic’s effect on last year’s data. Compared with June 2019, occupancy was down 9.8 percent, ADR was off 4 percent, and RevPAR declined 13.4 percent.

Among the top 25 markets, Tampa reported the highest occupancy level at 76.2 percent, a 3.2 percent increase over June 2019, according to STR. Seven additional markets had occupancy levels at or above 70 percent: Denver, Los Angeles, Miami, Nashville, Norfolk/Virginia Beach, Oahu and San Diego. 

Markets with the lowest occupancy for the month were San Francisco/San Mateo at 50 percent and Washington, D.C. at 50.8 percent. Still, these figures show a marked improvement for the top 25 from May 2021, when five markets reported occupancy levels below 50 percent. All five of those markets, plus three more, reported June occupancy between 50 percent and 59.9 percent. 

RELATED: STR: U.S. Hotel Recovery Accelerates in May



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Celebrity Cruises gets CDC approval for a June comeback, marking the first sailing from U.S. waters – Washington Post



Celebrity Cruises gets CDC approval for a June comeback, marking the first sailing from U.S. waters  Washington Post



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