Australia to remove international travel ban for fully vaccinated citizens from Nov 1, Australia


Australia to remove international travel ban for fully vaccinated citizens from Nov 1

In big breaking news, Australia has announced to lift its international travel ban from its fully vaccinated citizens and permanent residents from November 1. Now, the citizens would be able to travel internationally without requiring any special exemption or permission. The decision comes after Australia eases COVID-19 restrictions amid a spike in vaccination numbers.

The big decision comes after Singapore on Tuesday said it would allow fully-vaccinated travellers from Australia a quarantine-free entry from November 8. It’s been nearly 18 months that the Australians were not able to leave the country and travel abroad without a government waiver. On the other hand, thousands of fully-vaccinated residents had to live abroad because they were not allowed to return due to COVID-19.

Karen Andrews, Home Affairs minister, said, “Before the end of the year, we anticipate welcoming fully vaccinated skilled workers and international students”. She also said that for some non-citizens, travel restrictions would be eased as vaccination rates increased.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison told the local press, “The national plan is working … (it) is about opening Australia up and that is because the vaccination rates are climbing so high.”

During the outbreak, Australia was at a better place as compared to several other nations. Last year on March 20, Australia became one of those countries to levy some of the toughest border restrictions in the world. All the flights in the country were grounded and all the attractions were shut down.

Given its strict restrictions, the country till now has reported only 164000 COVID-19 positive cases and 1669 deaths.





Source link

US details new international COVID-19 travel requirements | National News


WASHINGTON (AP) — Children under 18 and people from dozens of countries with a shortage of vaccines will be exempt from new rules that will require most travelers to the United States be vaccinated against COVID-19, the Biden administration announced.

The government said Monday it will require airlines to collect contact information on passengers regardless of whether they have been vaccinated to help with contact tracing, if that becomes necessary.

Beginning Nov. 8, foreign, non-immigrant adults traveling to the United States will need to be fully vaccinated, with only limited exceptions, and all travelers will need to be tested for the virus before boarding a plane to the U.S. There will be tightened restrictions for American and foreign citizens who are not fully vaccinated.

The new policy comes as the Biden administration moves away from restrictions that ban non-essential travel from several dozen countries — most of Europe, China, Brazil, South Africa, India and Iran — and instead focuses on classifying individuals by the risk they pose to others.

It also reflects the White House’s embrace of vaccination requirements as a tool to push more Americans to get the shots by making it inconvenient to remain unvaccinated.

Under the policy, those who are vaccinated will need to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test within three days of travel, while the unvaccinated must present a test taken within one day of travel.

Children under 18 will not be required to be fully vaccinated because of delays in making them eligible for vaccines in many places. They will still need to take a COVID-19 test unless they are 2 or younger.

Others who will be exempt from the vaccination requirement include people who participated in COVID-19 clinical trials, who had severe allergic reactions to the vaccines, or are from a country where shots are not widely available.

That latter category will cover people from countries with vaccination rates below 10% of adults. They may be admitted to the U.S. with a government letter authorizing travel for a compelling reason and not just for tourism, a senior administration official said. The official estimated that there are about 50 such countries.

The U.S. will accept any vaccine approved for regular or emergency use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration or the World Health Organization. That includes Pfizer, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson, AstraZeneca and China’s Sinopharm and Sinovac vaccines. Mixing-and-matching of approved shots will be permitted.

The Biden administration has been working with airlines, who will be required to enforce the new procedures. Airlines will be required to verify vaccine records and match them against identity information.

Quarantine officers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will spot-check passengers who arrive in the U.S. for compliance, according to an administration official. Airlines that don’t enforce the requirements could be subject to penalties of up to nearly $35,000 per violation.

The new rules will replace restrictions that began in January 2020, when President Donald Trump banned most non-U.S. citizens coming from China. The Trump administration expanded that to cover Brazil, Iran, the United Kingdom, Ireland and most of continental Europe. President Joe Biden left those bans in place and expanded them to South Africa and India.

Biden came under pressure from European allies to drop the restrictions, particularly after many European countries eased limits on American visitors.

“The United States is open for business with all the promise and potential America has to offer,” Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo said after Monday’s announcement.

The main trade group for the U.S. airline industry praised the administration’s decision.

“We have seen an increase in ticket sales for international travel over the past weeks, and are eager to begin safely reuniting the countless families, friends and colleagues who have not seen each other in nearly two years, if not longer,” Airlines for America said in a statement.

The pandemic and resulting travel restrictions have caused international travel to plunge. U.S. and foreign airlines plan to operate about 14,000 flights across the Atlantic this month, just over half the 29,000 flights they operated during October 2019, according to data from aviation-research firm Cirium.

Henry Harteveldt, a travel-industry analyst in San Francisco, said the lifting of country-specific restrictions will help, but it will be tempered by the vaccination and testing requirements.

“Anyone hoping for an explosion of international inbound visitors will be disappointed,” he said. “Nov. 8 will be the start of the international travel recovery in the U.S., but I don’t believe we see full recovery until 2023 at the earliest.”

The Biden administration has not proposed a vaccination requirement for domestic travel, which the airlines oppose fiercely, saying it would be impractical because of the large number of passengers who fly within the U.S. every day.

———

This version corrects that Gina Raimondo is Commerce secretary.

———

Koenig reported from Dallas.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.



Source link

Automated train outage at Tampa International makes a long travel day even longer for some


TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) — Dan Anderson is a Tampa attorney and an experienced traveler who is very familiar with Tampa International Airport. After a long day of travel Sunday night, Anderson and dozens of other travelers ran into a problem when the SkyConnect train system shut down.

The SkyConnect is an automated train system that takes travelers from the main terminal building to the Economy Garage and Rental Car Center.

“The lady said, ‘well the tram is not working so you’ve got to go back down to curbside and there are going to be busses running,’” Anderson said. “Well, she didn’t say it was the red side, curbside, so I went to the Blue side.”

He was traveling by himself and only had one bag and a backpack, but he says others were not as fortunate.

“There were people with small children, it was late, elderly people, people with lots of baggage, golf clubs that they had to load onto this bus or mini bus or whatever, carting all of this stuff around,” Anderson said.

“It’s just not the type of thing you would want to have happen at that time of night.”

An airport spokesperson says a power outage caused the train to go down. The outage lasted about 90 minutes. Anderson said it took him at least that long to get from the terminal to his parked car. He said he was most disappointed by a lack of clear communication about the issue and where to go to get alternate transportation.

“I would have thought we would have thought this through, we would have some kind of a game plan for when something eventually breaks because we know it’s going to break” he said. “It’s such a great airport, you know we expect more and I think we are lucky to have a great airport and it was surprising to me to see how unprepared they were for what happened last night.

A statement from Tampa International Airport said “Along with safety, customer service is a top priority at TPA and we strive to deliver a perfect experience to our travelers. We apologize that we missed the mark in this instance, and we continue to look for ways we can improve service in the event of unforeseen circumstances such as this one.”



Source link

U.S. to outline Nov. 8 international travel reopening, vaccination rules


A U.S. flag is reflected on the floor as passengers make their way through Reagan National Airport in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque/File Photo

WASHINGTON, Oct 25 (Reuters) – The Biden administration plans to unveil on Monday its detailed rules requiring nearly all foreign air visitors to be vaccinated against COVID-19 starting Nov. 8, sources told Reuters.

The White House first disclosed on Sept. 20 it would remove restrictions in early November for fully vaccinated air travelers from 33 countries.

The extraordinary U.S. travel restrictions were first imposed in early 2020 to address the spread of COVID-19. The rules bar most non-U.S. citizens who within the last 14 days have been in the United Kingdom, the 26 Schengen countries in Europe without border controls, Ireland, China, India, South Africa, Iran and Brazil.

The White House plans to outline the legal framework requiring COVID-19 vaccinations for most foreign air travelers replacing the current restrictions, as well as rules for exemptions from the requirements.

The Biden administration will also detail requirements airlines must follow to confirm foreign travelers have been vaccinated before boarding U.S.-bound flights.

The White House announced on Oct. 15 that the new vaccine rules would take effect on Nov. 8.

One concern among U.S. officials and airlines is making sure foreign travelers are aware of the new vaccine rules that will take effect in just two weeks.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) plans to issue new contact tracing rules requiring airlines to collect information from international air passengers. The White House said earlier airlines will provide the information “upon request to follow up with travelers who have been exposed to COVID-19 variants or other pathogens.”

The CDC said this month it would accept any vaccine authorized for use by U.S. regulators or the World Health Organization and will accept mixed-dose coronavirus vaccines from travelers.

The new rules are expected to exempt minor children from the vaccine requirements, the sources said.

The Biden administration has also been discussing initially exempting citizens of a small number of countries with extremely low vaccination rates because of a lack of access to COVID-19 vaccines, the sources said, saying that would include enhanced testing requirements.

Foreign air travelers will need to provide vaccination documentation from an “official source” and airlines must confirm the last dose was at least two weeks earlier than the travel date.

International air travelers will need to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of departure. The White House said in September unvaccinated Americans will need to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test within 24 hours of departing.

Reporting by David Shepardson; Editing by Simon Cameron-Moore

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.



Source link

U.S. to Outline Nov. 8 International Travel Reopening, Vaccination Rules | World News


WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Biden administration plans to unveil on Monday its detailed rules requiring nearly all foreign air visitors to be vaccinated against COVID-19 starting Nov. 8, sources told Reuters.

The White House first disclosed on Sept. 20 it would remove restrictions in early November for fully vaccinated air travelers from 33 countries.

The extraordinary U.S. travel restrictions were first imposed in early 2020 to address the spread of COVID-19. The rules bar most non-U.S. citizens who within the last 14 days have been in the United Kingdom, the 26 Schengen countries in Europe without border controls, Ireland, China, India, South Africa, Iran and Brazil.

The White House plans to outline the legal framework requiring COVID-19 vaccinations for most foreign air travelers replacing the current restrictions, as well as rules for exemptions from the requirements.

Political Cartoons on World Leaders

The Biden administration will also detail requirements airlines must follow to confirm foreign travelers have been vaccinated before boarding U.S.-bound flights.

The White House announced on Oct. 15 that the new vaccine rules would take effect on Nov. 8.

One concern among U.S. officials and airlines is making sure foreign travelers are aware of the new vaccine rules that will take effect in just two weeks.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) plans to issue new contact tracing rules requiring airlines to collect information from international air passengers. The White House said earlier airlines will provide the information “upon request to follow up with travelers who have been exposed to COVID-19 variants or other pathogens.”

The CDC said this month it would accept any vaccine authorized for use by U.S. regulators or the World Health Organization and will accept mixed-dose coronavirus vaccines from travelers.

The new rules are expected to exempt minor children from the vaccine requirements, the sources said.

The Biden administration has also been discussing initially exempting citizens of a small number of countries with extremely low vaccination rates because of a lack of access to COVID-19 vaccines, the sources said, saying that would include enhanced testing requirements.

Foreign air travelers will need to provide vaccination documentation from an “official source” and airlines must confirm the last dose was at least two weeks earlier than the travel date.

International air travelers will need to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of departure. The White House said in September unvaccinated Americans will need to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test within 24 hours of departing.

(Reporting by David Shepardson; Editing by Simon Cameron-Moore)

Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters.



Source link

Turks and Caicos reopened to international travelers






UPDATE: Turks and Caicos reopened to international travelers























Advertiser Disclosure



Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.



Source link

Australian Government to update international travel warnings


With international travel back on the cards from November 1 – at least out of Sydney and Melbourne – and thousands of Australians headed overseas for the first time in over 18 months, the government will this week revise its travel warnings for almost 200 countries.

It’s a critical step in the restart of overseas travel, as the warnings – published on the Smarttraveller.com.au website operated by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade – impacts the availability of travel insurance.

And international travel insurance will be more important that even in the Covid era of travel, especially as several countries make some form of ‘Covid cover’ a condition of entry.

Singapore’s Vaccinated Travel Lanes – which may extend to Australia in November – require that inbound travellers hold a policy which includes at least SGD$30,000 for Covid-related medical expenses.

In Thailand, which will reopen to fully-vaccinated Australians from November 1 – mandates “medical insurance with a minimum coverage of USD$50,000.”

Also read: As Australia’s borders reopen, will your travel insurance cover Covid-19?

DFAT and Smarttraveller.com.au currently list all of the 177 countries on their watchlist as ‘Level 4 – do not travel’ destinations, with the sole exception of New Zealand which remains pegged as ‘Level 3 – reconsider your need to travel.’

Australian travel insurance providers typically won’t offer a policy if you’re headed for a country which DFAT has flagged as a Level 4 destination, which means that many people booking airfares right now for flights in November aren’t able to get travel insurance.

Travel insurance coverage is normally extended only to countries earmarked as ‘Level 1 – exercise normal safety precautions’ or ‘Level 2 – exercise a high degree of caution.’

In fact, the Smarttraveller website still carries the long-standing red alert first put in place in March 2020 saying “There’s a ban on overseas travel from Australia. You can’t leave Australia unless you have an exemption from the Department of Home Affairs, or are travelling to a destination that is exempt from the ban.”

Executive Traveller understands that DFAT is now working through a ‘risk assessment’ of all countries to update its travel advice to align with the reopening of Australia’s international border.

However, many countries are expected to remain at the current global ‘Level 4 – do not travel’ advisory or be nudged up to ‘Level 3 – reconsider your need to travel.’

“It’s important to check the reason that the country is under advice level 3, as you may not be covered for it,” DFAT advises.

Also read:



Source link

Unvaccinated Americans will face stricter testing under Biden’s international travel rules – The Washington Post



Unvaccinated Americans will face stricter testing under Biden’s international travel rules  The Washington Post



Source link

Australia Covid news live: Victoria, NSW, Qld international travel, eased lockdown restrictions and cases


Authorities have revealed the health of the unvaccinated Queensland case is rapidly deteriorating, with concerns he will soon need intensive care.

Welcome to Friday’s coverage of Australia’s Covid-19 situation.

Victorians have woken up to a raft of new freedoms for fully vaccinated residents after reaching its 70 per cent double vaccination goal yesterday.

The state recorded 2189 new cases and 16 deaths on Friday.

NSW recorded 345 new Covid cases and five deaths on Friday, with cases expected to rise over the coming days due to the state’s eased restrictions.

Queensland is also on high alert after a rideshare driver was infectious in the community for 10 days. Authorities said the man is “so sick” he can barely speak with contact tracers.

Follow below for today’s top updates. Keep refreshing the page for the latest news.

You can find yesterday’s blog here.

‘Extremely sick’: ICU fears for Qld case

Authorities have revealed the health of the unvaccinated Queensland case is rapidly deteriorating, with concerns he will soon need to go into intensive care.

The case, a rideshare driver in his 30s, was announced yesterday, where chief health officer Dr Jeannette Young wanted he was so sick that he was struggling to speak with contact tracers.

Speaking on Friday, Dr Young said he was still “very unwell”.

“They are keeping a very close eye on him. He is on high flow oxygen and he will probably need to go into intensive care,” she said.

“That is terrible. He is a very young, fit man who was not vaccinated and he is now extremely sick.

“The best thing we can all do to protect ourselves is to get vaccinated so we don’t end up in that situation. He was so sick that he probably has not been out in the community so we don’t have exposure venues for him other than his place of residence.”

Dr Young urged everyone with even the slightest symptoms to go and get tested immediately.

No new local cases in Qld

Queensland has recorded no new locally acquired Covid-19 cases.

It comes after the state recorded one new case yesterday, an unvaccinated man in his 30s from the Gold Coast who was recently in Melbourne.

Authorities announced yesterday that the man had been infectious in the community for 10 days and was now “too sick” to talk to contact tracers.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said it was “absolutely critical” for Queenslanders to get vaccinated.

“It is absolutely critical. This gentleman was unvaccinated. He is a fit man in his 30s. This is why it is critical that people get vaccinated,” she said.

“On the Gold Coast, can I please urge people there to get vaccinated and if you have any symptoms whatsoever, get tested.”

State hints at barring unvaccinated travellers

Western Australian Premier Mark McGowan has hinted that unvaccinated travellers could soon be barred from entering the state.

It comes after Western Australia announced strict new vaccine mandates for tens of thousands of workers, with a now revised document claiming unvaccinated people would be banned from crossing the border.

The frequently asked questions document published by WA Health stated that from “Monday 15 November all travellers from very low risk jurisdictions will be required to be fully vaccinated.”

“WA is the first jurisdiction to introduce this type of measure,” the document stated.

Under the current rules, travellers from medium, high or extreme risk areas cannot travel to WA unless they have an approval through the state’s G2G pass system.

Approved travellers from high risk areas must also show proof of at least one vaccine dose unless they are exempt.

However, Mr McGowan claims the new advice around vaccinations was not correct, though he did suggest that barring unvaccinated travellers could be the direction the state was heading.

“That’s not correct at this point in time, but that’s the way all the states are moving,” Mr McGowan told ABC Radio.

“Currently, anyone coming in from NSW or Victoria, that is the requirement.

“If you want to go overseas, get vaccinated. If you want to travel, get vaccinated. That’s basically the way the entire country is going.

“There have been some administrative mistakes there, but it’s certainly the broad direction we’re heading.”

The document has since been revised and the section on the border rules has been removed.

ACT records 13 Covid cases

The ACT has recorded 13 new locally acquired Covid-19 cases in the past 24 hours.

There are 20 Covid patients in the hospital, including 11 in intensive care.

Victoria records 2189 cases and 16 deaths

Victoria has recorded 2189 new locally acquired Covid-19 cases and 16 deaths in the 24 hours to 8pm last night.

It comes after the state recorded its second highest number of Covid cases on Thursday, with 2232 infections and 12 deaths.

Victorians are enjoying a raft of eased restrictions today after the state reached its 70 per cent vaccination milestone yesterday.

Experts have warned that cases will likely rise over the coming weeks as movement around Melbourne and the regions increased.

NSW records 345 cases and five deaths

NSW has recorded 345 Covid-19 cases and five deaths in the 24 hours to 8pm last night.

PM hints at more quarantine announcements

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has hinted that two more states will be making major changes to their quarantine restrictions today.

Mr Morrison said the national plan was “all about opening up Australia safely”, adding that is what today’s announcement from Qantas was about.

“It means that families are coming together again. It means kids are going back to school. It means the reunification of our country which I know we have all been so key to see. That begins with this,” he said.

The PM said he had “no doubt” that other states and territories would follow NSW’s lead to scrap quarantine requirements for international arrivals, adding some of those announcements could be expected today.

“The Premier of Victoria today will be making some further announcements and I’m looking forward to those. I know the Premier of Tasmania will be making further announcements today and I’m looking forward to those,” he said.

“I won’t pre-empt those, other than to say that the national plan is working, Australia is coming together, and we are realising the great efforts of the Australian people in rolling up their sleeves so we can move forward together and re-engage.”

Qantas announces new travel routes, accelerated reopening

Qantas has announced it will be bringing forward the restart of more international flights to popular destinations from Sydney, including operating flights to Delhi for the first time in almost a decade.

It comes after the Federal and NSW governments announced international borders would reopen from November 1, following a decision by NSW to remove quarantine requirements.

Qantas plans to launch the new route from Sydney to Delhi on December 6, with three return flights per week, building to daily flights by the end of the year.

The updated international schedule also includes:

• Sydney to Singapore flights resuming on November 23, four weeks ahead of schedule

• Sydney to Fiji, resuming on December 7, brought forward from December 19

• Sydney to Johannesburg, resuming on January 5, three months earlier than scheduled

• Sydney to Bangkok, resuming on January 14, more than two months earlier than scheduled

• Sydney to Phuket, resuming on January 12, more than two months earlier than scheduled

Qantas CEO Alan Joyce said the airline was also working on restarting flights to Bali before Christmas.

“We are in dialogue with the Indonesian government about opening up Bali for Australians that are fully vaccinated so that they don’t have to go into quarantine,” he said.

“Jetstar was the largest carrier operating into Bali. Australians were the largest visitors before Covid and it will be phenomenal news for our Jetstar people if we can operate into Bali before Christmas, which we’re working with the Indonesian Government to try and do that.”

Annoying rule scrapped in NSW

NSW residents have been freed from a widely hated Covid restriction, following a surprise change to the public health orders yesterday.

Gym-goers will now no longer be required to wear a mask during group classes, with Health Minister Brad Hazzard scrapping the rule following a raft of complaints, NewsLocal reports.

Many people had complained that the requirement was not practical and wearing a mask during a workout class made it difficult to breathe.

Residents can now remove their masks during indoor gym and dance classes, though they are still required it be worn in other areas of the gym, such as the reception area and change rooms.

Sports Minister Natalie Ward told the publication the change was a “step forward” for fully vaccinated gym-goers.

“It’s important people are able to exercise in as much comfort as possible, so I’m really pleased it will no longer be a requirement for masks to be worn during an indoor gym or dance class,” she said.

Vic set for major international travel announcement

Victoria is reportedly set to follow in NSW’s footsteps and remove quarantine requirements for fully vaccinated international arrivals.

This means people who arrive in Victoria from overseas will not have to go into hotel or home quarantine.

According to the ABC, travellers will need to need to be fully vaccinated and present a negative Covid-19 test.

It is believed the change will likely come into effect from November 1, the same day quarantine requirements will be scrapped in NSW.

The announcement is expected to be made during Victoria’s Covid press conference today.

It comes after NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet revealed last week that quarantine would be scrapped for international arrivals from November 1.

“Those people returning to Australia … and those who want to come back, who want to visit Australia and come to Sydney, hotel quarantine will be a thing of the past,” he said.

“Hotel quarantine, home quarantine is a thing of the past. We are opening Sydney and New South Wales to the world, and that date will come in on November 1st. This is a significant day for our state”.

When asked earlier this week whether Victoria would follow NSW’s lead, Premier Daniel Andrews suggested international arrivals to his state would still be required to quarantine at home.

“What Dominic announced the other day is he is getting rid of hotel quarantine, we will do a similar thing, it will be home-based particularly for those who are double-dosed,” he told Sunrise.

Victoria eases Covid restrictions

Victorians are waking up to eased restrictions this morning, with vaccinated residents now able to enjoy a number of new freedoms.

The changes came into effect at 11.59pm last night after the state reached its 70 per cent double dose vaccination milestone on Thursday.

The new freedoms include:

• Removing the Melbourne lockdown and curfew

• Up to 10 visitors to a home per day, including dependants

• 15 people can gather outdoors in Melbourne (20 in regional Victoria)

• Community sport training returns

• Pubs and clubs can open to 20 vaccinated people indoors and 50 outdoors. Entertainment venues can open to 50 vaccinated people outdoors

• In regional Victoria, Pubs, clubs and entertainment venues can open indoors to 30 vaccinated people

• All school students return onsite at least part time in Melbourne and full time in regional Victoria

• Funerals and weddings are allowed with 20 people indoors and 50 outdoors in Melbourne and 30 indoors and 100 outdoors in regional Victoria

• Hairdressing, beauty and personal care services can open to five vaccinated people indoors

Qld’s new Covid case a ‘wake up call’

Queensland recorded one new community Covid-19 case on Thursday, with authorities saying they are “concerned” about the new infection detected on the Gold Coast.

“Now this is a wake up call for the Gold Coast,” Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said.

“The issue with this gentleman is that they were not vaccinated. They were potentially infectious in the community for up to 10 days.”

The Premier urged anyone with the slightest symptoms to go and get tested.

Chief health officer Dr Jeannette Young revealed the unvaccinated man in his 30s is a rideshare driver, saying he had become so sick that he was struggling to even speak with contact tracers.

“He is so sick that we are having difficulties talking to him and getting information from him Dr Young said.

The man lives at an apartment complex in Broad Beach and is understood to have been in Melbourne on October 10 before coming back to Queensland.

“He started to develop symptoms on October 11, which means his infectious period goes back to October 9, but we believe he was in Melbourne at that stage,” Dr Young said.

“He became increasingly unwell, presented to the emergency department.”

Authorities are working closely with Uber to get information about whether the man had passengers during his infectious period.

Dr Young also revealed the man hadn’t used his QR code check in system when visiting venues since September.

“It is hard to work out where he has been in the community, “ she said.

Read related topics:Brisbane



Source link

Australia rolls out COVID-19 vax cert for international travel


The Australian government has started producing COVID-19 vaccination certificates for safe overseas travel.

Citizens and Australian visa holders with valid passports and who have COVID-19 vaccination records on the Australian Immunisation Register can obtain this international proof of COVID-19 vaccination. 

The certificate can be downloaded digitally or printed and is compatible with COVID-19 travel apps, such as the International Air Transport Association Travel Pass.

The proof of vaccination features a QR code that border authorities can scan to prove a user’s COVID-19 vaccination. According to a government media release, it is “as secure as an Australian passport and authenticated in the same way”. It also meets the global standard specified by the International Civil Aviation Organization and conforms with the guidance set by the World Health Organization.

The federal government said it will share the visible digital seal technology incorporated in the international certificate, along with a curated library of technical documents, to interested countries to help them develop their own vaccination certificates.

WHY IT MATTERS

Launching the vaccination certificate is a “key step towards safely reopening international borders and supporting Australia’s COVID-19 economic recovery,” the federal government said in a multi-agency release on Monday.

THE LARGER CONTEXT

Australians can now provide proof of COVID-19 vaccination through three ways: a digital certificate; immunisation history statement; and the latest international COVID-19 vaccination certificate for overseas travel. 

They can get their vaccination certificate either through their Medicare account on myGov or via the Medicare Express app. 

In other news, New South Wales tried out a vaccination passport app earlier this month, seeking to simplify the check-in process at hospitality venues so users do not have to move through separate apps for QR codes and vaccination certificates.



Source link