Martin’s car and home insurance warning ahead of groundreaking rule changes


7. More than one car in the home? Multicar policies could save or cost you £100s

Multicar insurance policies aren’tincluded on comparison sites, so to find out if you’ll save requires digital elbow grease.

My rule of thumb is first try the opposite to what you have, as insurance has always been about sucking in newbies with special deals. So if you’ve multicar, try standalone policies. Got standalone? Then try multicar.

The three pure multicar discount policies are from Admiral MultiCar*, Aviva* and LV*. All let you set up a policy at your 1st car’s renewal, leaving the other car(s) on its existing insurer until their renewal. See multicar split-year renewals.

There are also multi-policy discounts, reducing the cost if you’ve two cars, or get car and home insurance together. These include More Than (15% off), Axa* (up to 15%), Esure* (10%), Privilege (varies) and Sheilas’ Wheels* (10%). Plus, Direct Line* and Churchill also offer discounts for multiple cars.

Multicar worked for Kam, who told us on Facebook: “I saved £500 by sticking both my and my wife’s car on a multicar policy.”

But Nigel tweeted that splitting was better: “@MartinSLewis I was with multicar until at renewal they wanted over £1,300 for 3 cars. Got 3 individual policies for under £600.”





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Is Travel Insurance Worth the Cost Right Now? – NBC 7 San Diego


Planning a vacation can be stressful. The pandemic showed how quickly plans can change and need to be adjusted or even canceled. With borders opening back up and cruise lines running once again, people are taking a closer look at travel insurance.

“About one-third of Americans are now wanting to purchase travel insurance,” said Doug Shupe of the Auto Club of Southern California. “They say that it’s directly because of the pandemic.”

Travel insurance protects customers who have unexpected issues arise that affect their vacation plans. Depending on the type of insurance, it can cover anything from cancelations beyond your control, to family emergencies.

“Travel insurance is relatively inexpensive when you consider how much you spend on vacation,” said Shupe. “But reach out to the travel insurance provider to get questions answered before you purchase that insurance.”

Make sure you know exactly what is covered. Many vacations canceled because of the pandemic were not covered by travel insurance.

“In the past travel insurance has not covered epidemics or pandemics, but that is changing,” said Shupe. “More and more travel insurance providers are starting to meet consumer demand and wishes, so there are more coverage options for certain kinds of covid situations.”

There are two major types of travel insurance. Basic trip cancellation protection covers small things that go wrong, such as losing your bags or getting sick before a trip. Comprehensive travel insurance covers major issues such as a medical emergency, or even the destination being hit by a disaster.

Check to see if the travel insurance you are looking to purchase includes a “cancel for any reason” clause and double-check what the policy’s pandemic coverage is.

Buying comprehensive travel insurance can get costly, so weigh the pros and cons. Depending on the plan, it might cost between 4 and 12% of the total price of your trip. It may work better for more expensive and international travel, instead of short trips.

Also be sure to check with your credit card company, auto, and medical insurance providers. Some companies will provide protections for travel booked using their cards or for their customers.



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Why you should buy travel insurance for your holiday trip


TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) — Lori Judd knows a lot about planning vacations.

She’s been planning trips and getaways for nearly three decades. The longtime, licensed agent with Prestige Travel Vacations says now, more than ever, people should purchase travel insurance when planning a vacation, as too many things can go wrong.

Over the weekend, thousands of Southwest Airlines flights were canceled, and the disruptions continued Monday, when cancellations amounted to 10% of Southwest’s schedule, and at least 1,400 other flights, or roughly 40%, were delayed, according to the FlightAware tracking service. 

Many passengers were stuck in airports, scrambling to find a way to get home. One couple at the Tampa International Airport told WFLA they paid as much as $1,000 in additional costs. The airline has blamed everything from air traffic control issues, to disruptive weather, to staffing shortages.

With the holidays fast approaching, experts are predicting travel this season to reach pre-pandemic levels.

“It’s time we have to get back to life, and you need to cover those trip costs,” Judd said.

Passengers can protect themselves during the upcoming travel season by purchasing travel insurance ahead of time, experts say.

“I say that it’s highly recommended, and I give you the price upfront with trip insurance included because it is so important,” Judd told WFLA.

The question of whether to get travel insurance is top of mind for many right now as travel troubles continue to plague the country. Judd said purchasing travel insurance is absolutely worth it.

“I don’t believe it should be an add-on anymore in this day and age,” Judd explained. “It’s just too many things that can happen.”

She said she not only recommends insurance, but she also buys it herself for every trip she takes, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It’s a huge savings. So if you purchase it upfront and if you purchase it within seven to 14 days, it covers preexisting. You can get ‘cancel-for-any-reason’ for an extra benefit. Cancel for work reasons. There’s a lot of people who can’t go because, you know, last-minute, their boss says, ‘Oh, I’m sorry, but you have to do ‘this.’ I know you have a trip, but sorry,’” Judd remarked.

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With frequent delays and cancellations, along with the possibility of passengers testing positive for COVID-19, Judd advises not to take any chances.

“You have to test negative coming into the country if you fly out of the country. So, a lot of people don’t think about that extra cost they’re going to incur. And, the travel trip insurance will then help cover some of those extra amenities,” Judd said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



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Why you should get travel insurance for your holiday trip


TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) – Lori Judd knows a lot about planning vacations.

She’s been planning successful trips and getaways for nearly three decades. The longtime, licensed agent with Prestige Travel Vacations says now, more than ever, people should purchase travel insurance when planning a vacation.

She says in today’s travel world too many things can go wrong.

“It’s time we have to get back to life, and you need to cover those trip costs,” Judd said.

Passengers can protect themselves during the upcoming travel season, experts say, by purchasing travel insurance ahead of them, describing it as the key to a calm journey.

“I say that it’s highly recommended, and I give you the price upfront with trip insurance included because it is so important,” Judd told 8 On Your Side.

With the holidays fast approaching, those same experts are predicting travel this season to reach pre-pandemic levels.

Right now, Southwest Airlines is still facing countless flight delays, and that’s left many travelers scrambling to try and get home.

Thousands of flights were canceled over the weekend, and the disruptions continued Monday.

Many passengers were stranded in cities like Tampa, some of them stuck in the airport paying as much as $1,000 in additional costs. The airline blamed everything from air traffic control issues, to disruptive weather, to staffing shortages.

The question of whether to get travel insurance is top of mind for many right now, as travel troubles continue to plague the country.

Judd says purchasing travel insurance is absolutely worth it.

“I don’t believe it should be an add-on anymore in this day and age,” Judd explained. “There’s too many things that can happen.”

Judd says she not only recommends insurance, but she also buys it herself for every trip she takes, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The extra money, Judd told us, will pay for itself in peace of mind, which is priceless during a season shaping up to be busier than ever.

“It’s a huge savings. If you purchase it upfront, with 7-14 days, it covers preexisting, you can get ‘cancel-for-any-reason,’ you can get ‘cancel-for-work’ because a lot of bosses will say, oh you can’t go. I know you have a trip, but sorry,” Judd remarked.

With delays and constant cancellations in today’s current travel conditions, along with the possibility of passengers testing positive for COVID-19, Judd advises not to take any chances.

“You have to test negative flying into the country if you fly out of the country. So, a lot of people don’t think about that extra cost they’re going to incur. And, the travel and trip insurance will then help cover those extra amenities,” Judd said.



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Why you should you get travel insurance for your holiday trip


TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) – Lori Judd knows a lot about planning vacations.

She’s been planning successful trips and getaways for nearly three decades. The longtime, licensed agent with Prestige Travel Vacations says now, more than ever, people should purchase travel insurance when planning a vacation.

She says in today’s travel world too many things can go wrong.

“It’s time we have to get back to life, and you need to cover those trip costs,” Judd said.

Passengers can protect themselves during the upcoming travel season, experts say, by purchasing travel insurance ahead of them, describing it as the key to a calm journey.

“I say that it’s highly recommended, and I give you the price upfront with trip insurance included because it is so important,” Judd told 8 On Your Side.

With the holidays fast approaching, those same experts are predicting travel this season to reach pre-pandemic levels.

Right now, Southwest Airlines is still facing countless flight delays, and that’s left many travelers scrambling to try and get home.

Thousands of flights were canceled over the weekend, and the disruptions continued Monday.

Many passengers were stranded in cities like Tampa, some of them stuck in the airport paying as much as $1,000 in additional costs. The airline blamed everything from air traffic control issues, to disruptive weather, to staffing shortages.

The question of whether to get travel insurance is top of mind for many right now, as travel troubles continue to plague the country.

Judd says purchasing travel insurance is absolutely worth it.

“I don’t believe it should be an add-on anymore in this day and age,” Judd explained. “There’s too many things that can happen.”

Judd says she not only recommends insurance, but she also buys it herself for every trip she takes, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The extra money, Judd told us, will pay for itself in peace of mind, which is priceless during a season shaping up to be busier than ever.

“It’s a huge savings. If you purchase it upfront, with 7-14 days, it covers preexisting, you can get ‘cancel-for-any-reason,’ you can get ‘cancel-for-work’ because a lot of bosses will say, oh you can’t go. I know you have a trip, but sorry,” Judd remarked.

With delays and constant cancellations in today’s current travel conditions, along with the possibility of passengers testing positive for COVID-19, Judd advises not to take any chances.

“You have to test negative flying into the country if you fly out of the country. So, a lot of people don’t think about that extra cost they’re going to incur. And, the travel and trip insurance will then help cover those extra amenities,” Judd said.



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Kiplinger’s Personal Finance: Credit cards offer travel insurance | Business News








kiplinger-spending-20211008

Your card may provide some coverage if your trip is canceled or disrupted.




Just when many people thought the pandemic was over, the COVID-19 delta variant has threatened fall and winter travel plans. But if you booked a trip with a credit card that offers travel insurance, you may be able to recoup some of your costs.

For example, your card may provide some coverage if your trip is canceled or disrupted, and it may cover the cost of delayed or lost luggage.

In general, premium rewards cards — which typically charge an annual fee — provide better coverage.

Protections usually kick in when events that affect your trip are out of your control, said Nick Ewen, travel rewards expert at The Points Guy, a consumer travel website.

For example, suppose a flight delay caused you to miss a night in a hotel room that you reserved with an advance, nonrefundable payment. If you paid for the room with a credit card that includes travel insurance, the card would more than likely cover your loss. But if you decided you no longer wanted to go on the trip — perhaps because of concerns about COVID-19 — your card’s travel insurance probably wouldn’t cover your losses.

All cards are not created equal.

The Chase Sapphire Reserve card (annual fee $550) offers cancellation/interruption coverage of up to $10,000 per person, for example, while the American Express Platinum card (annual fee $695 for new cardholders) provides up to $10,000 per trip.



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Travel insurance is adapting to a world with COVID-19 — but there’ll be a catch


If extended lockdowns haven’t been enough to get you fantasising about your next overseas trip, maybe last week’s news last that international borders will start reopening in November has done the trick.

But when international travel resumes it’s not going to look the same as before, and COVID-19 has brought new risks that could impact you when you jet off abroad.

Here’s how travel insurance has changed since the international border closed.

Will travel insurance cover COVID-19?

As with travel insurance before the pandemic, it will depend on the policy you select.

Because most international travel from Australia has been suspended since March last year, most Australians haven’t had to worry about what might happen to them if they contract COVID-19 overseas.

plane window 2.jpg
You might want to consider travel insurance before jetting overseas.(

ABC

)

When COVID-19 first shut down global travel, many Australians weren’t covered because most insurance policies exclude pandemics and epidemics.

But now some insurers have begun offering COVID-19 travel policies.

If you get sick during a holiday and have to isolate (or worse, go to hospital for medical treatment) that could have flow-on effects for accommodation, transit and the people you’re travelling with — not to mention potential hospital bills.

COVID-19 cover aims to provide a level of protection for those circumstances, but those policies won’t cover everything, including a pretty big reason for cancelled plans across Australia.

That means policies are unlikely to cover you if your plans are cancelled or postponed due to state or international border closures, which can change quickly and with little warning.

Jodi Bird from consumer advocacy group CHOICE said there could be other ways for you to protect your money if your trip was impacted by border closures.

“The main way to make sure that you’re covered due to border closures is up front make sure that you’re booking flexible bookings … only book for those flexible accommodation locations,” he said, noting it was always harder to cancel a booking once you’d locked in dates.

“If you have to cancel, ask the actual provider if you can get your money back — a refund or a credit. If there’s no remedy there, then the next stage is essentially to raise it … with your state consumer affairs body.”

Travel insurance can be affected by the advisory status of your destination, as classified by the Australian government’s Smartraveller service.

Usually, insurance won’t cover you if you go to places listed as “do not travel” by Smartraveller.

A man and his daughter walk with luggage at the domestic terminal in Brisbane airpor.
International borders will start opening later this year.(

AAP: Dan Peled

)

Currently, every country in the world except for New Zealand is listed as “do not travel”, but that will change when international borders reopen from next month.

“Travel insurance will then be available with some COVID-19-related cover to these countries,” the spokeswoman for the Australian Insurance Council said.

“Travel insurance without COVID-19 cover is currently available from some insurers for international travel for those travelling with exemptions to Do Not Travel countries.”

She also said insurance, even without COVID-19 cover, remained an important consideration for international travellers.

Mr Bird said the two biggest things to look out for when getting travel insurance in the age of COVID-19 were:

  • Make sure your destination is definitely covered by your policy. Most policies won’t cover you if you go to a country the government advises against visiting
  • Make sure your policy explicitly covers COVID-19 because some don’t

Will you have to pay more for travel insurance?

Mr Bird said it was difficult to predict how prices could change in the wake of COVID-19, given the travel insurance industry had been disrupted.

“It’s hard to tell how COVID’s going to affect insurers’ premiums, so it is possible that you would have to pay more for that kind of cover,” he said, saying generally: “The more you pay, the more you’ll be covered for.”

A lack of competition could also be pushing up prices, as many providers have stopped offering travel insurance in the wake of the pandemic.

“There are a lot less travel insurers than there were a year and a half ago,” Mr Bird said.

“It could actually mean that … consumers might have to pay more.”

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COVID-19: Travel advice lifted for 32 destinations – and travel insurance will cover them again | UK News


Advice not to travel to 32 countries and territories due to COVID has been lifted by the government – meaning insurance firms will again cover them.

Fiji, The Gambia, Malaysia and Bangladesh are among the countries and territories the Foreign Office will no longer be advising against all but essential travel to.

This means that travel insurance will again cover people travelling to those destinations as many companies use that advice as a reference point to exclude cover.

However, it does not mean all those countries and territories are allowing international travellers in, so those planning a visit should check entry requirements.

Advice is expected to be lifted for more countries in the coming days.

However, the government may reintroduce the rules in “exceptional circumstances” such as if local healthcare is being overwhelmed by a domestic COVID outbreak.

Some countries and territories will continue to carry the advice to not travel there apart from essential travel, but it will not be due to COVID and instead will be because of other circumstances in the nation, such as instability. Travel insurers will continue to not cover them.

Countries on the red list will continue to have a warning against all but essential travel, but the government has said it will remove more countries from the red list soon.

This is the full list of countries and territories that travel advice has been eased for:

Algeria; Armenia; Bangladesh; Belarus; Benin; Comoros; Tokelau and Niue; Djibouti; Equatorial Guinea; Fiji; The Gambia; Guinea; Kazakhstan; Kiribati; Kosovo; Liberia; Madagascar; Malaysia; Marshall Islands; Micronesia; Nauru; Sao Tome and Principe; Senegal; Solomon Islands; Togo; Tonga; Tuvalu; Vanuatu; Congo; American Samoa; French Polynesia; and Ghana.

The government said the advice has been lifted for those countries and territories in light of the improved public health in those destinations, better understanding of the virus and the decreased risk to people coming from the UK as a result of the vaccine rollout.

Foreign Secretary Liz Truss said the move will “make travelling more straightforward” and support businesses and families.

“We’re striking the right balance between keeping people safe, which remains our priority, and giving them the freedom to exercise personal responsibility while supporting the travel sector as it continues to recover,” she added.

The move is part of a simplified system for international travel, with the COVID traffic light system for travel scrapped on Monday, so there is now only a red list.

Anybody who now arrives in the UK from a non-red list country and who is fully vaccinated against COVID-19 – and everyone under 18 – does not have to take a pre-departure test.

They also do not have to take a PCR test eight days after arrival or isolate at home, but still have to take a test on the second day after arrival in the UK.

People arriving from red list countries still have to take a pre-departure test, quarantine in a hotel for 10 days and take PCR tests on day two and eight.

Anybody planning to travel overseas should check gov.uk and local advice for entry requirements, including vaccination requirements.



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Why I’m still buying travel insurance for international vacations — even if it isn’t required






Why I’m still buying travel insurance for international vacations — even if it isn’t required




















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