P.E.I. Health officials advise Islanders to avoid non-essential travel


Islanders are being advised to avoid travel outside the province unless it is necessary.

“Due to the rising number of COVID-19 cases in Atlantic Canada and across the country, Island residents should carefully consider travel outside of P.E.I. at this time,” Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Heather Morrison said in a news release. “Now is not the time for non-essential travel.

“To protect ourselves and our community it is extremely important to get vaccinated against COVID-19, to be tested if you are experiencing even mild symptoms, and to keep your circle of contacts small.” 

There will also be increased testing at entry points for vaccinated and unvaccinated travellers from other Atlantic provinces, the news release said. 

Testing for N.B. travellers

Due to the rising number of COVID-19 cases in New Brunswick, travellers who have spent more than 48 hours in the province will be tested three times within eight days upon entry to P.E.I.

“Anyone who has been in N.B. for more than 48 hours will be asked to be tested at entry points and again on day four and day eight,” the news release said.

“Anyone who has traveled to N.B. for less than 48 hours will be asked to be tested upon return on day four and day eight.”

The Charlottetown drop-in testing clinic at 64 Park St. is extending its hours until 4 p.m. Saturday. 

Prince Edward Island has 39 active cases of COVID-19 and has had 293 positive cases since the pandemic began.

As of Sept. 22, 251,706 doses of vaccine had been administered in the province. More than 93 per cent of the eligible population has received at least one dose of vaccine and close to 86 per cent has received two doses. 

Everyone is encouraged to follow routine prevention measures:

  • Wash hands frequently with soap and water.
  • Cough and sneeze into your elbow or a tissue.
  • Get vaccinated.
  • Wear a non-medical mask in indoor places.
  • Stay home if you are not feeling well.
  • Limit touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Keep your circle of contacts small.
  • Physical distance – stay two metres apart.
  • Don’t share items like drinking glasses and water bottles.
  • Frequently clean surfaces like taps, doorknobs and countertops.
  • Visit a drop-in-clinic to be tested if you have COVID-19 symptoms.



Source link

Is travel safe this fall? Health experts weighed in with 6 trip ideas.


“With a bed-and-breakfast, they tend to be smaller capacity,” said Jaime C. Slaughter-Acey, a social epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota. “ … With fewer guests, or traffic going in and out of a bed-and-breakfast, that’s fewer opportunities for you to come into contact with someone who maybe is covid-positive and doesn’t know it.”



Source link

Health News Roundup: U.S. CDC warns against travel to Sri Lanka, Jamaica, and Brunei; Latest on the worldwide spread of the coronavirus and more


Following is a summary of current health news briefs.

Theranos founder’s defense may turn on state of mind, experts say

As Elizabeth Holmes’ fraud trial gets underway this week, lawyers for the former Silicon Valley entrepreneur may try to show she was a true believer in the blood-testing technology at her startup Theranos Inc, and never intended to defraud investors and patients, legal experts said. On Wednesday, federal jurors in San Jose, California will hear opening arguments in the case against the Stanford University dropout who once dazzled Silicon Valley and is now charged with misleading investors and patients by falsely claiming that the company’s printer-sized devices could run a range of tests and produce accurate results using a single drop of blood.

75% of U.S. adults have taken at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine – CDC

75% of adults in the United States have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine as of Tuesday morning, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. The agency said 193,798,688 of adults have had at least one shot, while 165,947,460 people, or 64.3% of the adult population, are fully vaccinated.

U.S. CDC warns against travel to Sri Lanka, Jamaica, and Brunei

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday warned against travel to Sri Lanka, Jamaica and Brunei because of the rising number of COVID-19 cases. The CDC raised its travel advisory to “Level 4: Very High” for those countries, telling Americans they should avoid travel there.

Factbox – Latest on the worldwide spread of the coronavirus

President Joe Biden on Thursday will present a six-pronged strategy intended to fight the spread of the highly contagious coronavirus Delta variant and increase U.S. COVID-19 vaccinations, the White House said on Tuesday. DEATHS AND INFECTIONS

Spain authorises booster COVID-19 shots for severely immunocompromised people

Spain’s healthcare regulator approved on Tuesday a third dose of COVID-19 vaccines for people with severely compromised immune systems who are likely to have weaker protection from the conventional two-dose inoculation schemes. The so-called booster shot should be administered 28 days after the previous one in some cases, and preferably the same type of vaccine is to be used, the Public Health Commission said in a statement. It would not say how many people could get such shots.

Mexican Supreme Court decriminalizes abortion in historic shift

Mexico’s Supreme Court unanimously ruled on Tuesday that penalizing abortion is unconstitutional, a major victory for advocates of women’s health and human rights, just as parts of the United States enact tougher laws against the practice. The court ruling in the majority Roman Catholic nation follows moves to decriminalize abortion at state level, although most of the country still has tough laws in place against women terminating their pregnancy early.

AstraZeneca boss Soriot says do not rush needlessly into COVID booster vaccines – The Telegraph

AstraZeneca Plc Chief Executive Pascal Soriot said booster COVID vaccine doses may not be needed for everyone in Britain and rushing into a nationwide rollout of third doses risks piling extra pressure on the National Health Service (NHS), the Telegraph reported on Tuesday. “We need the weight of the clinical evidence gathered from real world use before we can make an informed decision on a third dose,” Soriot wrote in the newspaper.

Biden to outline plan to curb coronavirus Delta variant as cases grow

President Joe Biden on Thursday will present a six-pronged strategy intended to fight the spread of the highly contagious coronavirus Delta variant and increase U.S. COVID-19 vaccinations, the White House said on Tuesday. The United States, which leads the world in COVID-19 cases and deaths, is struggling to stem a wave of infections driven by the variant even as officials try to persuade Americans who have resisted vaccination to get the shots. Rising case loads have raised concerns as children head back to school, while also rattling investors and upending company return-to-office plans.

Venezuela receives first batch of vaccines through COVAX mechanism

Venezuela has received its first batch of coronavirus vaccines through the COVAX mechanism intended for poor countries, the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) said on Tuesday, after months of delays the government attributed to U.S. sanctions. The South American country has received 693,000 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine manufactured by China’s Sinovac Biotech, the first of a total of 11 million it will receive through COVAX, overseen by the GAVI alliance and the World Health Organization.

Bristol-Myers to require U.S., Puerto Rico staff to be vaccinated

Bristol-Myers Squibb Co will require all its employees working in the United States and Puerto Rico to be fully vaccinated against the coronavirus effective Nov. 1, the drugmaker said on Tuesday. In the face of a resurgence in COVID-19 cases, spurred by the highly contagious Delta coronavirus variant, many U.S. companies have come out with mask mandates and changed their vaccination policies.

(With inputs from agencies.)



Source link

Activists Focus on Tip Site in Protesting Texas Abortion Law | Health News


By JAMIE STENGLE and BARBARA ORTUTAY, Associated Press

DALLAS (AP) — Young people on social media have found a way to protest Texas’ new law banning most abortions by focusing on a website established by the state’s largest anti-abortion group that takes in tips on violations.

They’ve shared short videos and guides on how to flood the Texas Right to Life site with fake information, memes and prank photos; it’s an online activism tactic that comes naturally to a generation that came of age in the internet era.

“I got the idea of, OK, well, we can sabotage these things online. It’s kind of like internet activism. Is it something we can realistically do and it’s not going to take us very long to do it,” said an 18-year-old TikTok user who goes by the name Olivia Julianna, using only her first and middle name due to safety concerns.

The law that took effect this month prohibits abortions once medical professionals can detect cardiac activity, which is usually around six weeks and before some women know they’re pregnant. It doesn’t make exceptions for rape or incest.

Political Cartoons

Though abortion providers say the law is unconstitutional, they say they are abiding by it.

“The law was not actually designed to be carried out in the sense of litigation, it’s designed to deter,” said Joanna Grossman, a law professor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. “It’s just designed to bring the entire system of women’s health care to a screeching halt through fear.”

The website was down over the long weekend after host GoDaddy kicked it off, saying said it violated the company’s terms of service, including a provision against collecting identifying information without consent. As of Tuesday, the site was being redirected to Texas Right to Life’s main website.

Texas Right to Life spokeswoman Kimberlyn Schwartz said Tuesday that the website’s domain is now registered with Epik and they’re in the process of moving to a new host, but aren’t yet disclosing which one. Epik used to host 8chan, an online message board known for trafficking in hate speech. Epik representatives haven’t responded to a message seeking comment Tuesday.

Schwartz said they are working to get the tipster website back up but noted that in many ways it is symbolic since anyone can report a violation. And, she said, abortion clinics appear to be complying with the law.

“I think that people see the whistleblower website as a symbol of the law but the law is still enforced, with or without our website,” Schwartz said, adding, “It’s not the only way that people can report violations of the law.”

Rebecca Parma, Texas Right to Life’s senior legislative associate, said they expected people to try to overwhelm the site with fake tips, adding “we’re thankful for the publicity to the website that’s coming from all of this chatter about it.”

And, Parma said, the website is just “another facet of the network we already have in place.” She said they have a network of anti-abortion attorneys and citizens who work with them, including people who are posted outside of abortion clinics and talk to people going in and coming out.

Julianna, who lives in Texas and has more than 136,000 TikTok followers, said that while she sees the tip website as more of a “scare tactic” than a threat, she has taken comfort in the like-minded people she’s found in her quest to thwart it.

“We’ve grown up in this new age of technology,” she said. “So now you don’t feel so isolated with what you believe in and your activism.”

Sean Wiggs, 20, who goes by Sean Black on TikTok, came up with a shortcut people could use to autofill the questions on the site. Wiggs, who lives in North Carolina, said he has received an “overwhelmingly positive” response on social media, and that he hopes efforts like his lead to more people “realizing the power that you have online.”

Julianna said she was inspired by TikTok activists who last year flooded a registration website for a rally in Oklahoma for then-President Donald Trump, although they had no intention of attending. While it’s unlikely they were responsible for the low turnout, their antics may have inflated the campaign’s expectations for attendance numbers that led to a disappointing crowd.

The law, which legal experts say was written in a way that puts defendants at a severe disadvantage, has left abortion providers leery of the potential cost of fighting a flood of frivolous lawsuits.

“I’ve never seen a statute that combines so many elements to disadvantage the defendant,” said Seth Chandler, law professor at the University of Houston.

For one, if the plaintiffs win, they can get attorneys fees and costs, Chandler said. If the defendants win, they can’t. Also, there could be multiple lawsuits filed in different counties based on the same allegation, and the statute prohibits a change of venue, he said.

“Even if the accusations that these vigilantes make are untrue, the staff and physicians would be put in the position of having to defend themselves in court, hire attorneys, travel for hearings, who knows in what county in Texas,” said Amy Hagstrom Miller, CEO of Whole Women’s Health, which has four abortion clinics in Texas.

Dr. Jonathan Metzl, a professor of sociology and psychiatry at Vanderbilt University, said that although the website seems “comically inept at this point,” it does “what the actual law on the books is asking people to do, which is to report on people.”

Wiggs said that aspect of the law, the “way that they are deputizing private citizens to incentivize them to snitch on their neighbors,” really stood out to him.

“It’s just the way that they’re turning people against each other over an already polarizing topic such as abortion,” Wiggs said.

Texas has a history of creative forms of protest. In 2016, college students protested a new law allowing people to carry concealed handguns in public places, including universities, by walking around campus with sex toys in their hands and strapped to their backpacks, calling the protest “cocks not Glocks.” It got attention.

But, Metzl notes, it didn’t stop the Legislature enacting laxer gun laws.

“It’s a form of protest and resistance, but it hasn’t been effective changing policy,” he said. “The best way to change policy is to win elections.”

Ortutay reported from Oakland, California.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



Source link

Health officials concerned holiday travel could cause spike in COVID-19 cases


COLUMBIA, Mo. (KMIZ)

Health officials are concerned Labor Day travel could cause another spike in COVID-19 cases, especially among the unvaccinated population.

This comes as the start of the school year has brought an uptick in cases among children who are not vaccinated.

Dr. Nancy Tofil, the Director of the Division of Pediatric Critical Care at the UAB & Children’s of Alabama said the Delta variant is hitting the unvaccinated population hard.

“Most are either unvaccinated or under the age of 12 and unable to get vaccinated,” Tofil said. “The numbers have been three or four times what we were seeing last winter at its peak.”

The CDC is warning people who are traveling to take caution during the holiday and has a warning to the unvaccinated population.

“If you are unvaccinated, we would recommend not traveling,” CDC Director, Dr. Rochelle Walensky said.

According to the CDC, the U.S. has averaged over 150,000 cases a day for the past week. This is an increase of nearly 5% compared to the previous week.

CDC COVID-19 Daily Case Data – Sept. 6, 2021

The Missouri State Dashboard reports the state averaging over 1,500 cases a day for the past seven days of data available. This data set is from Aug. 27 – Sept. 2.

The state has seen 38 COVID-19 deaths during this time period.

The State Vaccine Dashboard has seen an uptick in vaccine orders within the past month. The most recent Aug. 30 vaccine order was for 65,900 vaccines. The order was up over 40 thousand vaccines from the July 26 order of 20,560 vaccines.

According the the dashboard, 52.2% of Missourians have gotten at least one dose of the vaccine. Nearly 40% of kids between the ages of 12-17 have gotten vaccinated and 63.3% of adults are vaccinated.



Source link

Roundup: Rfider links COVID-19 test with digital health pass for travel, Vietnam’s tourism app features health declaration form and more briefs


New Zealand-based Rfider links COVID-19 test with digital health pass for travel

New Zealand software firm Rfider has enabled a COVID-19 test in Singapore to connect with a digital health pass for international travel.

In a statement, the company said it has been chosen by Invitrocue, a Singapore-based bioanalytic solutions provider, to empower its saliva-based antigen and PCR-based COVID-19 tests with a technology that allows tracking, tracing and verification. 

Through Rfider’s platform, the Invitrocue tests provide users with a unique ID that helps prevent counterfeiting and enables test results authentication. 

It is also able to securely send the test reports to their mobile devices to be used as a travel pass. 

Rfider says its technology has established compatibility with the Verity platform for such a purpose. Created by self-sovereign identity applications developer Evernym, the said platform is behind the digital health pass of the International Air Transport Association (IATA), which is now being trialled at over 40 airlines globally, including the Australian flag carrier Qantas

“We are pleased to be working with Rfider to make this possible. With this partnership, individuals will be able to store their health data securely on their mobile device and privately share it with trusted providers and authorities with the tap of a button,” Evernym VP of Product James Monaghan said.

The Rfider technology, according to chief executive John Pennington, helps cut down the time to deliver test reports to workers at hospitality and tourism venues, which in turn, ushers in the recovery of in-person events around the world. 

Dr Stephen Fang, executive director of Invitrocue, said its partnership with Rfider enabled them to “scale the deployment” of their testing platform and deliver results to users and even to decision makers in “real-time”. “It is a step-change in not only the way testing is conducted but how we can get better data faster,” he added.


Health declaration form integrated in Vietnam’s tourism app 

Vietnam’s mobile tourism app called “Du lick Viet Nam an toan” now features a health declaration form.

According to a news report, the inclusion of the health declaration form, which connects to a system managed by the National Steering Committee on COVID-19 Prevention and Control, is part of health authorities’ efforts to enhance their pandemic response. Adding the new feature also removes the need for users to switch to another platform just to fill out the form.

Launched last year in October by the Vietnam National Administration of Tourism, the mobile app contains a digital map that shows information on restaurants, hotels, apartments, entertainment places, transport providers, hospitals and pharmacies.

The tourism app also provides the most updated information about the COVID-19 situation in any destination, including details about infection cases and the number of recovered patients.

Developers are working to add other features, such as COVID-19 safety verification, COVID-19 vaccine certification, health records, travel insurance and e-tickets.

The news report noted that due to the prevailing travel restrictions and border closures, there were only about 105,000 international tourist arrivals recorded in the country in the first eight months of 2021, a 97% decline compared to the same period in 2020. 


Indian medical news portal goes mobile

Medical Dialogues, an online medical news portal in India, has launched its mobile app for Android and iOS devices. 

The Google news-registered portal provides medical news, guidelines, interesting cases and news about the healthcare industry. It claims to have over two million visits each month. The news site has a HONcode certification for bringing authentic health information on the internet.

Its development, according to the company, comes following demand from over 600,000 medical fraternities who are registered users of the portal.

Aiming to empower and update doctors with medical knowledge, the app contains new features such as video library, webinars for doctors and interactive modules like quizzes, surveys and polls.

“As the pioneer of risk management in the country, doctors have to be associated with the medical updates under the COVID-19 guidelines as the virus is taking a new shape every week. Doctors need to be updated with the latest information about COVID-19. With maintaining the dictum of offering the best service, Medical Dialogues has launched the app for healthcare and medical professionals,” Dr Prem Aggarwal, co-founder of Medical Dialogues, said.


Vietnamese-American charity group extends free teleconsultations to COVID-19 patients in Vietnam

Vietnamese-American charity organisation Good Samaritan Medical Dental Ministry has collaborated with the provinces of Dong Nai and Tien Giang in Vietnam to deliver free remote doctor consultations with COVID-19 patients at home.

According to a news report, a telemedicine system will be used to connect the patients with doctors in the US and Vietnam for virtual consultations. 

The report noted that Dong Nai and Tien Giang are among southern provinces in the country that reported high incidences of COVID-19 infections. In Dong Nai, for instance, around 23,000 citizens have contracted the disease with over 200 people already dead.

The charity group said they could accommodate between 200 and 300 COVID-19 patients for consultations “every four hours”. They also offered help to deliver blood oxygen monitoring devices and oxygen concentrators from the government to patients needing them.



Source link

UArizona Research Project to Monitor Health of SpaceX Inspiration4 Crew Members


College of Medicine – Phoenix

Today

zenhausern and colleagues
From left to right: Frederic Zenhausern with Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine researchers Jerome Lacombe, Ali Fattahi, Jian Gu; Kaitlyn Janssen, an Arizona State University undergraduate student studying biomedical engineering; Jasmine Devadhasan; and Alexander Summers.

Space flight is not just for astronauts and rocket scientists anymore. SpaceX Inspiration4, the world’s first all-civilian mission, will make the dream of orbiting Earth come true for a crew of civilians on Sept. 15. Researchers with the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, led by center director Frederic Zenhausern, will provide the first in-flight testing of multiple biomarkers of stress, inflammation and immunity measured in a zero-gravity environment to monitor the health of the four-member crew.  

The essential task of protecting humans from exposure to hazards is critical to the prospect of future deep space exploration. Zenhausern and his team developed a novel technology that will monitor crew members’ stress, inflammation and immune levels during space flight through a blood droplet from a fingerstick or a saliva sample.

“Our development of advanced molecular diagnostics for multipurpose indications of emerging infectious diseases, health performance or risks of environmental exposure must benefit all populations where possible,” Zenhausern said. “This Inspiration4 mission shares some operational requirements similar to a consumer health product to be performed at home or in low-resources settings, which must be easy to use, minimally invasive, rapid and low cost.”

VeriFAST device
A VeriFAST device.

The Vertical Integrated Flow Assay System Technology, known as VeriFAST, uses blood or saliva deposited onto a device to perform rapid assessments of physiological or molecular effects on humans. The system provides precise measurements, including multiplex molecular diagnostics, to detect possible radiation exposure. The devices have nanoporous membranes printed with arrays of reagents arranged in rows. When the assessments are completed, the spots in the array change color, providing visual results within minutes.

Zenhausern and his team designed the VeriFAST platform to assess a full range of biomarkers, from proteins to genes. While the Inspiration4 mission will take less than a week to complete, it will provide a unique opportunity to apply the VeriFAST platform to help researchers study the molecular and physiological levels in the human body under extreme zero-gravity conditions. One of the biomarkers measured by VeriFAST is the C-reactive protein. The level of that protein in blood has long been used as a diagnostic marker of inflammatory response, including the response occurring in cancer. This biomedical data will offer valuable insights and help inform the measures necessary to protect future astronaut crews in orbit during longer missions.

Zero gravity, confinement and radiation experienced during space flight can have significant health consequences. Space radiation is risky to the human body, potentially causing damage to the DNA in cells. Radiation exposure may occur during deep-space missions and can increase the risk of long-term health consequences such as cancer. Adverse effects to the central nervous and cardiovascular systems may also occur.  It is difficult to determine remotely the health consequences on the tissues and cells of crew members.

“As civilian space travel becomes more frequent and accessible, the university is well positioned to lead in the important, emerging field of aerospace biomedicine,” said Elizabeth “Betsy” Cantwell, the university’s senior vice president for research and innovation. “The new knowledge Dr. Zenhausern’s group will create through SpaceX Inspiration4 is really the tip of the iceberg toward a better understanding of in-flight health.”

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health, known as TRISH, funded the project, which is part of a research complement to be conducted during the multi-day journey. The Inspiration4 crew, commanded by Jared Isaacman, founder and CEO of Shift4 Payments, will contribute to the space biomedical community by participating in important scientific research during the mission. Inspiration4’s goal is to inspire humanity and to advance cancer research through collaboration with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

If the VeriFAST platform is validated by the Inspiration4 crew, it could provide a valuable blood and saliva analysis system to support the health and performance of future space crews. The biomedical samples collected during the Inspiration4 mission will become part of a biobank used for future collaborations by research teams at SpaceX, TRISH and the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix.

“Innovation and problem solving to improve health are at the core of what we do. That impact has been felt in Arizona, around the world and now for those in space,” said Dr. Guy Reed, dean of the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix. “This collaboration with TRISH, SpaceX and the ANBM Center creates synergies that will help to protect humans against radiation injury and other hazards that they encounter during space travel. It will fuel the development of new therapies and preventive strategies for crew members and patients here on Earth and beyond.”

A version of this article originally appeared on the College of Medicine – Phoenix website: https://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/spacex



Source link

Drive Medical Scout 4 Mobility Scooter Review – Forbes Health


The Scout 4 is a simple, portable mobility scooter. Most people who use this scooter have health or mobility issues but still want to get out and remain active, according to Torres. “Some can still walk and just need to use a scooter part-time,” he says.

To operate the Scout 4, set the speed knob on the console to the speed range you want and push a small throttle to start moving. This scooter doesn’t go fast—its speed maxes out at 4.25 miles per hour. The electromagnetic brake system senses when you engage the throttle and automatically releases the rear wheels. When you let go of the throttle, the brakes automatically activate and the unit slows to a stop.

Comfort Features

The height and angle of the padded seat are adjustable to fit your body. The armrest width and angle can also be adjusted, and the angle of the tiller can be tilted to fit the length of your arms so you can drive without leaning forward.

Safety Features

As a four-wheel scooter with two small anti-tip wheels at the rear, the Scout 4 offers a stable ride. There’s no danger in speeding since its speed tops out at 4.25 miles per hour. But it doesn’t have headlights or rear lights, so it’s not safe to drive outside at night.

Portability

The Scout 4 is designed to be a travel scooter, so it’s easy to take apart and reassemble. “It disassembles to four pieces,” says Torres. “I can take it apart in less than a minute. For older people, it might take a few minutes,” he says. And “everything has a handle. So when you disassemble the rear section, that has a handle. The front section has a handle and the battery box has a handle,” adding that the seat is easy to carry.

Usability

It’s a versatile mobility scooter for indoor and outdoor use—within limits. The ground clearance is only 2.5 inches, so it’s best driven on smooth, compact terrain, says Torres. “If you drive over loose gravel or sand, you’ll sink,” he says. “You can take it on light grass if it’s not too thick.” If you’re unsure about driving this scooter over a particular surface, avoid it, the owner’s manual advises.

The Customer Service Experience

Several calls to the Drive Medical customer service line were answered immediately by courteous and well-informed representatives. They took time to answer many detailed questions and offered information to help understand the uses and limitations of the scooter. Representatives were well-versed in all kinds of scooters, as they were able to compare the Scout 4 to others in terms of stability, comfort and usability.

Warranties and Discounts

Drive Medical offers a lifetime warranty for the mainframe, seat post, platform and frame welds; a 24-month warranty on the motor, throttle, brakes and other items; and a 12-month warranty on batteries. Battery manufacturers provide a 6-month warranty, so if something goes wrong after six months, the batteries are covered for the next six months by the Drive Medical warranty.



Source link

UArizona Research Project to Monitor Health of SpaceX Inspiration4 Crew Members During Mission


College Researchers Designed Novel Molecular Diagnostics Technology to Monitor the Health of Four Crew Members during First All-Civilian Mission to Orbit

SpaceX Inspiration4 LogoSpace flight is not just for astronauts and rocket scientists anymore. SpaceX Inspiration4, the world’s first all-civilian mission, will make the dream of orbiting the Earth come true for a crew of civilians September 15. Researchers with the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, led by Frederic Zenhausern, PhD, MBA, will provide the first in-flight testing of multiple biomarkers of stress, inflammation and immunity measured in a zero gravity environment to monitor the health of the four-member crew.

The essential task of protecting humans from exposure to these hazards is critical to the prospect of future deep space exploration. Dr. Zenhausern and his team developed a novel technology that will monitor crew members’ response to measure stress, inflammation and immune levels during space flight through a blood droplet from a simple fingerstick or a saliva sample.

“Our development of advanced molecular diagnostics for multi-purpose indications of emerging infectious diseases, health performance or risks of environmental exposure must benefit all populations where possible,” said Dr. Zenhausern, director of the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine. “This Inspiration4 mission shares some operational requirements similar to a consumer health product to be performed at home or in low resources settings — which must be easy to use, minimally invasive, rapid and low cost.”

The VIFAS Technology
The VIFAS Technology

The Vertical Integrated Flow Assay System (VIFAS) technology uses blood or saliva deposited onto a test strip to perform rapid assessments of radiobiological effects on humans. The system provides precise measurements, including multiplex molecular diagnostics, to possible radiation exposure. The test strips have nanoporous membranes printed with arrays of reagents arranged in rows. When the assessments are completed, the spots in the array change color providing visual results within minutes.

Zenhausern and his team designed the VIFAS technology to assess a full range of biomarkers, from proteins to genes. While the Inspiration4 mission will take less than a week to complete, it will provide a unique opportunity to apply the VIFAS technology to help researchers study the molecular and physiological levels in the human body under extreme zero gravity conditions. This biomedical data will offer valuable insights and help inform the measures necessary to protect future astronaut crews in orbit during longer missions. 

Zero gravity and radiation experienced during space flight can have significant health consequences. Space radiation is risky to the human body, potentially causing damage to the DNA in cells. Radiation exposure may occur during deep-space missions and can increase the risk of long-term health consequences, such as cancer. Adverse effects to the central nervous and cardiovascular systems may also occur. It is difficult to determine remotely the health consequences on the tissues and cells of crew members.

Ali Fattahi, PhD, Works with the VIFAS Technology
Ali Fattahi, PhD, Works with the VIFAS Technology

“As civilian space travel becomes more frequent and accessible, the university is well positioned to lead in the important, emerging field of aerospace biomedicine,” said Elizabeth “Betsy” Cantwell, PhD, the university’s senior vice president for Research and Innovation. “The new knowledge Dr. Zenhausern’s group will create through SpaceX Inspiration4 is really the tip of the iceberg toward a better understanding of in-flight health.”

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) funded the project, which is part of a research complement to be conducted during the multi-day journey. The Inspiration4 crew, commanded by Jared Isaacman, founder and CEO of Shift4 Payments, will contribute to the space biomedical community by participating in important scientific research during the mission.

If the VIFAS platform is validated by the Inspiration4 crew, it could provide a valuable blood and saliva analysis system to support the health and performance of future space crews. The biomedical samples collected during the Inspiration4 mission will become part of a biobank used for future collaborations by research teams at SpaceX, TRISH and the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix.

“Innovation and problem-solving to improve health are at the core of what we do. That impact has been felt in Arizona, around the world and now for those in space,” said Guy Reed, MD, MS, dean of the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix. “This collaboration with TRISH, SpaceX and the Center for ANBM creates synergies that will help to protect humans against radiation injury and other hazards that they encounter during space travel. It will fuel the development of new therapies and preventive strategies for crew members and patients here on Earth and beyond.”



Source link

New Travel Reimbursement System Available To Veterans And Beneficiaries | VA Hudson Valley Health Care


Montrose
, NY — New travel reimbursement system available to Veterans and beneficiaries

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October  23, 2020

 

Contact:       Cullen Lyons, VA Hudson Valley Public Affairs Officer

Phone:          914-737-4400 ext. 2255

Cell:              914-475-7633

Email:           Cullen.Lyons@va.gov

 

 

New travel reimbursement system available to Veterans and beneficiaries

 

Montrose NY — The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced on October 22, 2020 that the VA Hudson Valley Health Care System will now use the new Beneficiary Travel Self-Service System (BTSSS) to reimburse eligible Veterans and beneficiaries for travel to and from VA medical appointments.

 

The new system will allow users to submit and track transportation reimbursement claims using a secure web-based portal on the Access VA, available 24/7, 365 days a year.

 

“Thanks to the important innovations and dedication to information technology, we are proud to say we have streamlined this process making it easier for users,” said Dawn Schaal, Medical Center Director. “The BTSSS replaces the need for older, manual tracking methods, bringing this process in line with many of our other web applications.”

 

BTSSS has many advantages, for example, it:

  • Reduces the need for completing hard copy claim submissions in-person at the facility by replacing and eliminating the previous kiosk method.
     
  • Provides an easy to use web-based application that allows you to enter your claim over the internet via AccessVA.
     
  • Ensures timely processing and payment of travel reimbursements and reduces manual intervention and improper claim payments through automated features
     
  • Authenticates the Veteran or Beneficiary by: 1.) VA PIV card; or 2.) A DS Logon Level 2 account.

 

BTSSS will be available at the VA Hudson Valley Health Care System beginning in October, 2020. As BTSSS goes live, the need for kiosk will be discontinued, however, in person and hard-copy claims submission will still be available. For information on eligibility, visit VA’s Travel Pay Reimbursement site.



Source link