CDC designates Antigua, Bermuda, Guyana as “very high” COVID-19 travel risks


Sept. 20 (UPI) — A pair of popular island travel destinations were added to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “very high” risk category on Monday.

The CDC designated Antigua and Barbuda in the Caribbean and Bermuda in the Atlantic along with the South American country of Guyana on its “Level 4: Very High” COVID-19 travel advisory.

People are encouraged to avoid traveling to locations designated Level 4, according to the CDC. The agency also advises that anyone who must travel to such locations be fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

Destinations designated as Level 4 have reported more than 500 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 residents within the past 28 days.

As of Monday, a total of 90 destinations have been designated as “very high” risk for COVID-19.

All three of the destinations elevated to Level 4 Monday had previously been designated “Level 3: High,” which indicates they have reported between 100 and 500 cases per 100,000 residents within the past 28 days.

Also Monday, the CDC upgraded Bonaire, Sao Tome and Principe and Ukraine from “Level 2: Moderate” to Level 3, while New Caledonia, was raised from “Level 1: Low” to Level 3.

Andorra, Colombia and Kuwait were all downgraded from Level 4 to Level 3.

The CDC broadly recommends that Americans avoid international travel entirely unless they are fully vaccinated.



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Guyana takes action to avoid TIP designation


(MENAFN – Caribbean News Global)




Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs, Anil Nandlall

By Kemol King

GEORGETOWN, Guyana, (DPI) – Attorney general and minister of legal affairs, Mohabir Anil Nandlall says the government is trying to prevent possible sanctions for enabling an environment for Trafficking in Persons (TIP); stated, it is, for this reason, president Dr Mohamed Irfaan Ali instituted a visa requirement for Haitians seeking to enter Guyana.

Local records show that some 38,187 Haitians who entered Guyana cannot be accounted for. This, he said, has become a cause for concerns for the government. The attorney general said between 2015 and 2021, some 42,100 Haitians legally entered the country; however, only 3,913 left.

‘Trafficking in persons is one of the most serious offenses afflicting the world today. Human smuggling is a major international threat in today’s global environment, and it is against that backdrop that one must view the decision of the government of Guyana.

Guyana is a very close-knit society. I don’t think anyone can argue that 38,187 Haitians are with us in Guyana. It would be impossible and improbable for anyone to try to articulate such a contention. It is plainly and manifestly false if anyone would attempt to do that. So where did 38,187 persons go?’

The government intelligence indicates that many of the Haitians who came are women and children, including pregnant mothers and underage girls.

‘When they enter into Guyana, from all the evidence, and we have accumulated evidence over a protracted period of time, there is a highly organised operation that has all the trappings of an organised ring that deals with these Haitians.

“From the time they leave the departure lounge of the CJIA, they are whisked away into waiting vehicles and they are taken to destinations in various parts of the country.’

The trend shows that their travel and other identification documents are seized, while they are kept in secret accommodation by the persons in charge of the operation.

The attorney general noted the most recent incident involves 10 Haitians, none of whom are older than 23, who came to Guyana illegally through Suriname. They include five women, one of whom is pregnant, and five men. The 10 young people were discovered by police in rooms at a Skeldon, Corentyne hotel.

The group is currently in government care while police investigations continue.

The attorney-general said the decision to quash the visa-free entry for Haitians was carefully analysed for months. Deliberations included discussions with Brazil, whose leaders expressed concerns that Guyana is being used as a transhipment point for this organised ring. The government had also engaged Suriname and Cuba, whose leaders expressed similar concerns. The government’s concerns were also shared with the United States, United Nations human rights organisations, and the International Criminal Police Organisation (Interpol) … the decision was taken.

‘Guyana is part of a global village, and Guyana, as every country in that village, is required to sign on to international conventions, and is expected to execute certain protocols which are required internationally.

“Guyana is not without experience when it comes to sanctions being imposed on it,’ the attorney-general added.

He recalled an incident prior to 2015 when the People’s Progressive Party Civic as a minority government, where the combined opposition refused to support legislation relating to anti-money laundering and countering the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT).

‘As a result, a whole constellation of sanctions was imposed on Guyana’s financial sector. Up to now, we are still battling to remove those sanctions and the stigma that it carries.’

The attorney-general said the government has to face regular assessments of its AML-CFT structure, to ensure that it is not contaminated with illegal funds and that it is not a haven for drug trafficking, terrorism and money laundering.

Similar obligations in relation to human trafficking and smuggling led the government to take the decision to impose the visa requirement on citizens of Haiti. The attorney-general relayed that Guyana is not alone in imposing this requirement, pointing to Trinidad and Tobago, The Bahamas, Jamaica, Antigua and Barbuda, Saint Lucia, Belize, St Kitts and Nevis, and Dominica.

MENAFN27062021000232011072ID1102349826


Legal Disclaimer: MENAFN provides the information “as is” without warranty of any kind. We do not accept any responsibility or liability for the accuracy, content, images, videos, licenses, completeness, legality, or reliability of the information contained in this article. If you have any complaints or copyright issues related to this article, kindly contact the provider above.



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Guyana takes action to avoid TIP designation


(MENAFN – Caribbean News Global)




Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs, Anil Nandlall

By Kemol King

GEORGETOWN, Guyana, (DPI) – Attorney general and minister of legal affairs, Mohabir Anil Nandlall says the government is trying to prevent possible sanctions for enabling an environment for Trafficking in Persons (TIP); stated, it is, for this reason, president Dr Mohamed Irfaan Ali instituted a visa requirement for Haitians seeking to enter Guyana.

Local records show that some 38,187 Haitians who entered Guyana cannot be accounted for. This, he said, has become a cause for concerns for the government. The attorney general said between 2015 and 2021, some 42,100 Haitians legally entered the country; however, only 3,913 left.

‘Trafficking in persons is one of the most serious offenses afflicting the world today. Human smuggling is a major international threat in today’s global environment, and it is against that backdrop that one must view the decision of the government of Guyana.

Guyana is a very close-knit society. I don’t think anyone can argue that 38,187 Haitians are with us in Guyana. It would be impossible and improbable for anyone to try to articulate such a contention. It is plainly and manifestly false if anyone would attempt to do that. So where did 38,187 persons go?’

The government intelligence indicates that many of the Haitians who came are women and children, including pregnant mothers and underage girls.

‘When they enter into Guyana, from all the evidence, and we have accumulated evidence over a protracted period of time, there is a highly organised operation that has all the trappings of an organised ring that deals with these Haitians.

“From the time they leave the departure lounge of the CJIA, they are whisked away into waiting vehicles and they are taken to destinations in various parts of the country.’

The trend shows that their travel and other identification documents are seized, while they are kept in secret accommodation by the persons in charge of the operation.

The attorney general noted the most recent incident involves 10 Haitians, none of whom are older than 23, who came to Guyana illegally through Suriname. They include five women, one of whom is pregnant, and five men. The 10 young people were discovered by police in rooms at a Skeldon, Corentyne hotel.

The group is currently in government care while police investigations continue.

The attorney-general said the decision to quash the visa-free entry for Haitians was carefully analysed for months. Deliberations included discussions with Brazil, whose leaders expressed concerns that Guyana is being used as a transhipment point for this organised ring. The government had also engaged Suriname and Cuba, whose leaders expressed similar concerns. The government’s concerns were also shared with the United States, United Nations human rights organisations, and the International Criminal Police Organisation (Interpol) … the decision was taken.

‘Guyana is part of a global village, and Guyana, as every country in that village, is required to sign on to international conventions, and is expected to execute certain protocols which are required internationally.

“Guyana is not without experience when it comes to sanctions being imposed on it,’ the attorney-general added.

He recalled an incident prior to 2015 when the People’s Progressive Party Civic as a minority government, where the combined opposition refused to support legislation relating to anti-money laundering and countering the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT).

‘As a result, a whole constellation of sanctions was imposed on Guyana’s financial sector. Up to now, we are still battling to remove those sanctions and the stigma that it carries.’

The attorney-general said the government has to face regular assessments of its AML-CFT structure, to ensure that it is not contaminated with illegal funds and that it is not a haven for drug trafficking, terrorism and money laundering.

Similar obligations in relation to human trafficking and smuggling led the government to take the decision to impose the visa requirement on citizens of Haiti. The attorney-general relayed that Guyana is not alone in imposing this requirement, pointing to Trinidad and Tobago, The Bahamas, Jamaica, Antigua and Barbuda, Saint Lucia, Belize, St Kitts and Nevis, and Dominica.

MENAFN27062021000232011072ID1102349826


Legal Disclaimer: MENAFN provides the information “as is” without warranty of any kind. We do not accept any responsibility or liability for the accuracy, content, images, videos, licenses, completeness, legality, or reliability of the information contained in this article. If you have any complaints or copyright issues related to this article, kindly contact the provider above.



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Guyana Tourism Authority rolls out “Safe for Travel” plan


The objective of the scheme is to protect the areas most affected and vulnerable to the COVID-19 pandemic as well as to ensure the health and safety of the travelers

  • New plan to open up tourism and ensure communities and travelers remain protected
  • National COVID-19 Task Force to assess tourism businesses
  • The reopening is currently in phase three which has seen the expansion of commercial flights

The Guyana Tourism Authority (GTA) has launched a new marketing messaging tied to its revamped inspection process due to COVID-19 titled “Safe for Travel” that sees the tourism body, given the authority by the National COVID-19 Task Force, to assess tourism businesses to ensure they are operating within the National COVID-19 Gazetted Safety Measures and in a position to welcome the return of domestic and international travel. The objective of the scheme is to protect the areas most affected and vulnerable to the COVID-19 pandemic as well as ensure that the health and safety of the traveler is always front-of-mind as the destination reopens to tourism. 

In response to coronavirus, the Government of Guyana cancelled all international passenger flights beginning 18 March 2020, however the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority has since launched a phased re-opening approach. Details of which are as follows: 

Phase 1 – 18 March – 11 October 2020: Repatriation flights. 

  • Phase 2 – 12 October 2020: Limited incoming commercial flights for Guyanese citizens, permanent residents, international travelers, international workers and diplomats.  
  • Phase 3 – November 2020 (in place as of January 2021): Expansion of incoming commercial flights that allow foreign nationals and international travelers to enter Guyana.  
  • Phase 4 – TBC: Expansion of inbound and outbound flights to provide more service for inbound and outbound tourists.  

As of January 2021, this reopening is currently in phase three which has seen the expansion of commercial flights that now allow foreign nationals and international travellers to enter Guyana. With this comes risk that the virus could spread from visitors to some of Guyana’s most vulnerable communities in a country that has seen relatively low case rates throughout the pandemic.  

To protect these communities and the general population, travellers to Guyana are required to present a negative PCR test from an accredited lab. Negative tests from within 72 hours of arrival will be allowed to pass through the airport. However, if the PCR test is done within four to seven days of travel, the passenger will be required to do another PCR test upon arrival in Guyana and present a negative test. It should be noted that if a passenger is required to take a test in Guyana, it will come at their expense at a cost of GY$16,000 (approx. £56).

The ‘Safe For Travel’ scheme has been put in place as a further measure to protect the Guyanese population, including vulnerable communities, and travelers alike. Tourism businesses are assessed in a two-step procedure. First, they must submit their Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) detailing how the business has adjusted its practices and adopted new measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Once the SOP has been submitted, the GTA will carry out an inspection on the business to ensure they are meeting the criteria as follows: 

1.Signage (hand wash, mask wearing and social distancing) 

2.Temperature Monitoring (calibrated thermometer temperature checks) 

3.Sanitisation – practices and products in use 

4.Staff Safety 

5.Guest Safety  

6. Monitoring – how the business plans to monitor the effectiveness of its SOP  

Once a tourism business has been assessed and deemed to be COVID-19 compliant by the GTA and National COVID-19 Task Force, approval is granted for the business to begin operating once again.

In addition to these newer measures, the GTA was able to provide COVID-19 Support Packages to indigenous communities tied to the tourism value chain earlier in the pandemic. Communities that are actively in the tourism licensing process and working with the GTA benefited from a package that included recommended Ecolab cleaning and sanitation products, infrared thermometers, cloth and sewing supplies for creating masks, knapsack sprayers to disinfect buildings and luggage etc, and signage on COVID-19. For communities not actively involved in tourism, the packages included sanitation products, cloth and sewing supplies for creating masks and signage on COVID-19. The support packages were delivered with a training session done by Ecolab and Ministry of Health representatives as well as the GTA. 



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