Rosewood appoints former Google exec to head global sales


Lucy Werner
Lucy Werner

Rosewood Hotel Group has appointed Google executive Lucy
Werner to the newly created role of SVP of commercial, overseeing global sales
and marketing, revenue management and digital performance marketing across all
regions of the company’s five brands, Rosewood announced.

Werner has more than 20 years of global experience in
business development, digital, sales and operations. She previously served as
head of cloud for Google Hong Kong, and held senior leadership positions at
Spruce Media, adBrite and JP Morgan. She assumes her new role on 1 November
2021.

In addition, Caroline MacDonald will transfer from her
position as group VP of sales and marketing, distribution and business
performance to SVP of operations for the Americas. She begins her new role in
January 2022.



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Google Flights will show carbon emissions in flight results : NPR


Google Flights will now show users what the carbon emissions of their prospective trips will be when they search for flight options.

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Google Flights will now show users what the carbon emissions of their prospective trips will be when they search for flight options.

Anton Petrus/Getty Images

Now you can fly and take into account the environmental cost of your trip a little easier.

Starting Wednesday, search results on Google Flights will show users what the carbon emissions of their prospective trips will be so that a buyer can consider their environmental footprint in the same way they would price and duration, Google explained in announcing the new feature.

The company went with a color-coded system, with green signifying the most environmentally friendly flights, and with sorting options that allow users to prioritize carbon emissions when booking their trips.

Google lands on their final numbers by integrating third-party information from airlines and the European Environmental Agency. Numerous factors go into the carbon cost of a flight, including the type of plane being used, the route being taken, and even the number of seats on the aircraft, according to Google’s Help Center.

Emissions from air travel are expected to triple

Google says the move is just part of its overall efforts to address climate change and make it easier for customers to choose sustainability. Last month, it joined the Travalyst Coalition, a group of brands committed to making sustainability the standard in the travel industry. Among other participants are popular travel websites like Booking.com and Tripadvisor.

“It’s critical that people can find consistent and accurate carbon emissions estimates no matter where they want to research or book their trip,” Google said.

Greenhouse gas emissions from commercial flights make up around 2% of the world’s total carbon emissions, and are expected to triple by 2050, according to the International Council on Clean Transportation.

Some people are now shunning air travel

Amid growing concerns about climate change and ever-worsening natural disasters, some travelers have begun taking matters into their own hands. Groups like Flight Free are comprised of people who have committed not to use air travel, both as a means of reducing carbon emissions and as a way of sending a message to those in power that climate change is a priority, according to their website.

But the onus on making change isn’t primarily on individual consumers; government officials are beginning to look to manufacturers to bear at least some of the burden.

Last year, the Environmental Protection Agency announced plans to make aircraft manufacturers in the U.S. match international emissions standards by 2028. The move was applauded by some as a step in the right direction, but others were less impressed; a coalition of 11 states and Washington, D.C., argued that the new rules would not actually substantially decrease emissions, according to Reuters.



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How to use Google Travel to plan your next vacation | News







Google Travel What The Tech

Americans clearly are ready for a post-pandemic vacation.

Over the July 4 holiday weekend, the TSA reported over 10 million people passed through airport checkpoints which are close to pre-pandemic numbers over the Fourth of July holiday in 2019.

If you’re looking to book a vacation now for late summer or early fall, you can spend hours using different websites and apps to browse hotels, airline fares, and places to see.

Just before the global pandemic, Google decided to pull the plug on the popular Google Trips planning tool. If you’re just now planning a trip again, you’ll be happy to know Google Trips is now Google Travel.

The website, there’s no app, allows travelers to search for and book flights, hotels, and vacation rentals. And it makes it easier to find the best deals. Just search for Google Travels.

Select where you want to go and the dates and Google pulls all of the information together in one place.

I’ll plan a trip to Yellowstone National Park in September as an example. Google Travel shows typical weather conditions and any travel restrictions. I get some idea of flight prices from my home. Remember, Google knows where you live.

Google puts the best flights at the top along with prices for all the dates which could save me hundreds by traveling a day earlier or a day later. I can track prices too with email updates on flights anywhere near Yellowstone. If I select “book this flight”, it takes me to the airline website.

Google Travel shows hotels, prices and ratings and reviews, and photos from other travelers. Plus articles on the hotel from a Google search. It also shows available vacation rentals.

Under “Things to do” other travelers post photos and reviews. Zoom in on a map of where you’re staying to see some off-the-beaten-path secret treasures discovered by travelers or some “local favorites”.

Once you book the trip, any confirmations coming to your Gmail address get added automatically to the itinerary. Bookmarking a stop puts it on a to-do list.

There are lots of things to love with the Google Travel platform and it can and does make trip planning convenient.

But there’s a drawback for anyone concerned with privacy. Whatever you search for is saved in Google. So expect to see related ads pop up across the web. Plus, all of your previous trips are stored in Google. I checked and mine go back to 2016. A trip to Las Vegas is in my travel history, including the flight number and the hotel where I stayed. While that might be good for me to access the information or book the same trip, it can be worrisome to have that information stored on Google’s servers.

You can delete the history along with your travel information in your Google Activity window.

Google Travel is another great tool if you don’t mind it all being saved somewhere with everything else Google sees and stores about you.



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Online Travel Update: Spanish hotels made claims against Booking.com over its pricing practices; recently passed house bill may impact Google’s travel products; and Google delays rollout of its controversial third-party cookies | Foster Garvey PC


This week’s Update features a variety of stories, including details on the recent change in leadership at Booking.com in the Asia-Pacific region. Enjoy.

Spanish Hoteliers Cry Foul
(“Hotels in Spain sue Booking.com for ‘abusive practices’ – ‘40% more than real price’,” June 22, 2021 via Daily Express)
The Madrid Hotel Business Association recently announced that it had made claims against Booking.com to the Spanish competition authority, asking the authority to investigate the online travel agency’s practices. The claims center around Booking.com’s rate parity requirements (which the Association alleges result in booking prices 40 percent higher than its members’ own prices), and the degree of control that Booking.com’s website wields over the hotels’ guests – booking management and (now) payments. The Association’s complaints came on the heels of similar claims made by the Spanish Association of Hotel Directors.

Recently Passed House Bill Could Significantly Affect Google’s Travel Products
(There Is A Good Chance Google Travel’s Ambitions Are About To Be Reined In, Legislatively,” June 24, 2021 via Skift Travel News) (subscription may be required)
Last week’s passage of the American Choice and Innovation Online Act by a House committee could ultimately force some major changes at Google, Facebook and other online platforms. Under the Act, the platforms would be prohibited from providing preferential treatment to their products, services and businesses over those of their competitors. Presumably (though the Act does not specifically state), the Act would apply to Google Flights, Google Hotels and Google Things To Do. If passed, the Act would represent a victory for many of Google’s biggest critics (and customers), TripAdvisor and Expedia. The Act still requires consideration and approval by the full House and Senate before becoming effective.

Google Delays Rollout of Controversial Third-Party Cookie Policy
(“Google delays plan to bar tracking cookies,” June 24, 2021 via Washington Post)
Congratulations to all the digital marketers out there, you now have a little longer to prepare for Google’s planned policy of blocking third-party tracking cookies. The recently announced decision by Google extends commencement of the policy until late 2023. Note that no similar postponement has been announced by Apple.


Other News:

Expedia Group Looks to Close the Lopsided Profit Margin Gap With Booking Holdings
June 23, 2021 via Skift Travel News (subscription may be required)
It’s been a perennial handicap in the competition between Expedia Group and Booking Holdings — Booking Holdings is a much more profitable company. But now Expedia boss Peter Kern is holding out hope that his company can at least narrow the gap.

Delta-Sabre Deal Will See Global Distribution System Paid on Booking’s Value, Not Flat Fee
June 22, 2021 via Phocus Wire
A revamped distribution agreement between Delta and Sabre has the potential to disrupt the standard commercial payment model between airlines, Global Distribution System and travel advisors.

Booking.com Names Laura Houldsworth as New Asia-Pacific Chief
June 24, 2021 via WIT
Booking.com has appointed Laura Houldsworth as Managing Director & Vice President for the Asia-Pacific region, effective June 2021. She succeeds Angel Llull Mancas, who served as Managing Director for Asia Pacific since August 2018.



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Online Travel Update: Spanish Hotels Made Claims Against Booking.com Over Its Pricing Practices; Recently Passed House Bill May Impact Google’s Travel Products; And Google Delays Rollout Of Its Controversial Third-party Cookies – Media, Telecoms, IT, Entertainment



United States:

Online Travel Update: Spanish Hotels Made Claims Against Booking.com Over Its Pricing Practices; Recently Passed House Bill May Impact Google’s Travel Products; And Google Delays Rollout Of Its Controversial Third-party Cookies


To print this article, all you need is to be registered or login on Mondaq.com.

This week’s Update features a variety of stories, including
details on the recent change in leadership at Booking.com in the
Asia-Pacific region. Enjoy.

Spanish Hoteliers Cry Foul

(“Hotels in Spain sue Booking.com for ‘abusive
practices’ – ‘40% more than real price’,”
June 22, 2021 via Daily Express)


The Madrid Hotel Business Association recently announced that it
had made claims against Booking.com to the Spanish competition
authority, asking the authority to investigate the online travel
agency’s practices. The claims center around
Booking.com’s rate parity requirements (which the Association
alleges result in booking prices 40 percent higher than its
members’ own prices), and the degree of control that
Booking.com’s website wields over the hotels’ guests
– booking management and (now) payments. The
Association’s complaints came on the heels of similar claims
made by the Spanish Association of Hotel Directors. 
   

Recently Passed House Bill Could Significantly
Affect Google’s Travel Products 

(There Is A Good Chance Google Travel’s Ambitions Are
About To Be Reined In, Legislatively,” June 24, 2021 via Skift
Travel News) (subscription may be required)


Last week’s passage of the American Choice and Innovation
Online Act by a House committee could ultimately force some major
changes at Google, Facebook and other online platforms. Under
the Act, the platforms would be prohibited from providing
preferential treatment to their products, services and businesses
over those of their competitors. Presumably (though the Act
does not specifically state), the Act would apply to Google
Flights, Google Hotels and Google Things To Do. If passed, the Act
would represent a victory for many of Google’s biggest critics
(and customers), TripAdvisor and Expedia. The Act still
requires consideration and approval by the full House and Senate
before becoming effective.

Google Delays Rollout of Controversial Third-Party
Cookie Policy

(“Google delays plan to bar tracking cookies,”
June 24, 2021 via Washington Post)


Congratulations to all the digital marketers out there, you now
have a little longer to prepare for Google’s planned policy of
blocking third-party tracking cookies. The recently announced
decision by Google extends commencement of the policy until late
2023. Note that no similar postponement has been announced by
Apple. 

The content of this article is intended to provide a general
guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought
about your specific circumstances.

POPULAR ARTICLES ON: Media, Telecoms, IT, Entertainment from United States

New ESG Lawsuit Targets Aspirational Statements

Kelley Drye & Warren LLP

Earlier this month, the nonprofit Earth Island Institute filed a lawsuit against Coca-Cola, alleging that the company falsely and deceptively represents itself as “a sustainable and environmentally friendly company, ..

A Legal Primer On Social Tokens

Global Advertising Lawyers Alliance (GALA)

Finally wrapped your head around the Taco Bell NFT drop? Not so fast. Time to learn about “social tokens,” a rapidly-growing class of blockchain-based assets being used to connect with consumers in new and exciting ways.



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Travel search terms on Google show scale of pent-up demand: Travel Weekly


Google has published figures revealing how desperate consumers are to travel again. 

The company says search demand for travel in May was up 270% compared with May 2020 and that the figure is likely to rise.

Unsurprisingly searches for the term “flights to Portugal” spiked towards the end of May and as restrictions in the U.K. lifted, searches for places to stay in the U.K. were up more than 75% year-on-year.

More recent figures from Skyscanner reveal massive increases in search volumes for destinations placed on the U.K’s green list this week.

Searches to Palma, Majorca were up 690% in 24 hours, Ibiza searches increased 845% while searches to Madeira increased 1749% in the same period.

Google points to research revealing changing needs and concerns from consumers. Skyscanner, for example, has said travel companies are seeing an increase in advance bookings for later in the year.

In addition, searches for the term “beach holiday” have been steadily rising in 2020 but “city breaks” are not yet recovering compared to 2019 levels. 

Activities also seem to be on consumers’ minds, with the term “rentals near” seeing global growth of 100% year-on-year.

Top searches in this category include “kayak rentals near me,” “bike rentals near me” and “boat rentals near me.”
As U.K. consumers figure out where to go safely and within restrictions, Google says searches for terms such as “where to travel to” have risen alongside views of travel-related content on YouTube.

Google’s tips to help marketers in these turbulent times include monitoring trends to discern what is pandemic-related and what will remain and implementing different strategies for difference audiences.

Source: PhocusWire



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Google tracks travel trends | WWLP


BOSTON (SHNS) – As high temperatures spur people to think of summer travel, would-be tourists who Google potential destinations in Massachusetts will find state travel trends embedded in their search results page.

Along with advice and advisories for travel during COVID-19, Google is posting weekly numbers showing the number of flights arriving at a destination compared to last year, and the percentage of available hotels, calculating by dividing the number of hotels that are “open and bookable” by the total number in the destination.

In Massachusetts, according to the search engine, 58 percent of flights are operating and 76 percent of hotels have availability.



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Online Travel Update: Expedia continues to overhaul their leadership; Sabre partners with ByHours to distribute hourly room rentals; Google Travel includes vacation rentals in search results | Foster Garvey PC


This week’s Update features a couple of stories (including one by Seattle’s own Geekwire.com) detailing the recent executive shake up at Expedia. Enjoy.

Expedia’s Re-Structuring Continues
(“Expedia Group Hires Top Execs From Apple and Verizon as Part of Leadership Structure Overhaul,” May 24, 2021 via GeekWire; “Expedia Trims Business Units, Sees a Trio of Executive Departures,” May 24, 2021 via Skift Travel News (subscription may be required))
Over the past few weeks, we’ve featured stories detailing Expedia’s ongoing re-structuring efforts. Last week saw another big change at Expedia as the company announced the departures of veterans, Cyril Ranque, Adam Jay and Tucker Moodey. Ranque’s departure is particularly interesting as Ranque, the Travel Partners Group President, had been featured prominently in many supplier contract issues and negotiations. Joining Expedia are two top executives from Apple and Verizon, Jon Gieselman and Rathii Murthy, respectively. Gieselman will oversee the newly created business unit, “Expedia Brand,” while Murthy becomes Expedia’s new Chief Technology Officer. With these changes, Expedia also announced the creation of four new consolidated business units or “key pillars” within Expedia – Expedia Services, Expedia Brands, Expedia Marketplace and Expedia for Business. It will be interesting to note where Expedia’s products and services fall within these units and how the units will work together to sell these products and services to their key supplier partners.

Sabre Begins Distributing Hourly Room Rentals
(“Sabre Partners With ByHours to Sell Hotel Rooms by the Hour,” May 27, 2021 via PhocusWire)
Global distribution system, Sabre, announced this past week that it has partnered with booking platform, ByHours, to offer travel agents and their clients hourly room reservations. The partnership is a first for the legacy distribution providers. Barcelona-based, ByHours, claims to be the first online platform to offer hourly stays.

Vacation Rentals Continue Their March Toward Accommodation Legitimacy.
(“Google Travel Adds Vacation Rentals Alongside Hotels in Search Results,” May 27, 2021 via PhocusWire)
Although not the first to feature vacation rental listings alongside traditional accommodations (both Booking.com and Expedia do so today), Google’s announced listing changes last week garnered a lot of attention. As of last Thursday, travelers searching Google for accommodations in a particular jurisdiction may see available vacation rentals alongside traditional hotel room accommodations in the same search result. According to Google, the combined listings will be ranked based on relevance to the traveler’s search query. While the combined listing format may not be new, Google’s use of the combined listings signals a broader recognition of travelers’ growing demands for hotel room alternatives and for those hoteliers who have found success with the Google metasearch product, the potentially dilutive effect of the combined listings may make their direct booking efforts more difficult.


Other News:

Supreme Court Ends Tax War, Says Cities Must Pay Litigation Costs to Hotels.com
May 27, 2021 via Courthouse News
The Supreme Court affirmed a two million dollar court costs bill Thursday (May 27) against municipalities that had accused Hotels.com and other travel booking agencies of shortchanging them on occupancy taxes.

Trip.com Group CEO Downplays Market Share Against China Antitrust Backdrop
May 26, 2021 via Skift Travel News (subscription may be required)
Given China’s crackdown on internet platforms in February, Trip.com Group officials did something they rarely do — trot out specific market share numbers in a recent earnings call. After one analyst asked Trip.com CEO Jie Sun recently whether China’s largest travel seller would be able to avoid penalties for price discrimination or monopoly power, Sun said Trip.com supports the government’s efforts to create a “healthy” market environment.

The Push For Direct Bookings: Hotels Can Have It Both Ways
May 24, 2021 via Phocus Wire
Numerous reports suggest that hotels have seen a swing towards consumers booking direct as lockdown restrictions ease and travel resume.



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Google Maps Street View: ‘Flying man’ leaves Reddit users confused | Travel News | Travel


Google Maps Street View is traditionally used to help people navigate their way around the world. However, thanks to its use of 3D cameras, the online application often uncovered some rather unexpected moments taking place in all corners of the globe.

Of course, while it may be fun to imagine this gardener has suddenly acquired magical talents, there is an alternative explanation.

It is much more likely he is jumping in the air.

One Reddit user suggested he is “celebrating”.

His outstretched arms could be a sign he is punching the air for joy.

Another commended the man’s ability to jump so high.

“Our boy has some serious ups,” they wrote.

Sadly, the actual back story of the scene may forever remain a mystery.

The man has a pair of dark sunglasses on which conceal most of his face, making him unrecognisable.





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Google announces additional travel advisory notices in search and updates to its trip planning tools






Google announces additional travel advisory notices in search and updates to its trip planning tools











































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