PA Gas Prices | Eyewitness News


EYEWITNESS NEWS (WBRE/WYOU) — Many are also hitting the highway to travel home after the Thanksgiving holiday and gas prices continue to fluctuate.

In Pennsylvania the average price at the pumps is nearly 20 cents more than the national average. The prices are sitting around $3.60. They continue to rise and fall but only by a few cents.

The White House says it will release 50 million barrels of oil, which they hope will lower gas prices across the country that have significantly escalated this year.



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How rising gas prices, travel changes are impacting independent car services


Gas prices can be an extra ten bucks a month for some, but for independent car services like Chey Cab, it’s a mortgage payment.

The holidays are a very busy time of year, and Chey Cab is on the road a lot right now. From airport runs during the day to bars and parties at night. And that’s all good, but when she goes to the gas pump, she’s not celebrating.

“It’s real for us, it’s real,” founder and owner Chey Eisenman said.

Chey and other drivers have been watching the numbers climb, and their business change. The pandemic means quick trips with corporate clients have dwindled, but retail has surged. That means they’re driving a lot more miles, and when you depend on gas to keep your business rolling along, the gas prices really hurt.

“Per car we’ve seen about a $1,200 a month rise in fuel per vehicle. That’s significant,” she said. “So when you’re a small business person, that money that’s not going to your bottom line is not coming home with you to pay your mortgage.”

Right now, Minnesota averages about $3.16 a gallon, lower than the national average. But a year ago, we were paying a $1.95 and two years ago, it was $2.66.

“It’s much more go go go in mileage and fuel,” Chey said.

Chey Eisenman is the owner and founder of Chey Car, a luxury car service in the Twin Cities area. (FOX 9)

Now it’s not just high gas prices that have changed for Chey and other drivers. Travel patterns have also changed. The Wednesday before Thanksgiving was typically the busiest travel day, but she’ll tell you, not anymore.

“Now with work from home people leave the Friday or Saturday or Sunday before or weekend before,” Chey said.

But on the return, one day will be extra busy with travelers who may not see Sunday as their fun day.

“We’ve had to close our books for a two-hour window on Sunday because we already have too many reservations,” she said.

Now there are some predictions that gas prices could come down with President Biden tapping into oil reserves. Chey is hopeful that could bring her business and others a little relief.





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Experts see greater holiday travel, but COVID, gas price concerns remain | News


ANDERSON — Roads and airports should be noticeably busier this week, but travel industry experts are still wary that many Americans, concerned about rising gas prices, will choose to stay at home again this Thanksgiving.

“While vaccines have helped travelers feel more comfortable, rising gas prices and continued concerns about the pandemic are making many Americans hesitant to travel during the holidays,” Chip Rogers, president and CEO of the American Hotel & Lodging Association, said in a news release this week.

An AHLA survey conducted over three days near the end of October found that 29% of Americans are likely to travel for Thanksgiving and 33% are likely to travel for Christmas — an increase from 21% and 24%, respectively, compared to 2020. But industry experts worry that, for those who do plan to travel over the holidays and expect to drive, rising gas prices may dampen those plans.

The holiday travel forecast from the American Automobile Association (AAA) strikes a more optimistic tone, predicting that about 53.4 million people will travel for Thanksgiving this year, up 13% from 2020. AAA expects as many as 6.4 million more travelers on the roads and at airports this year.

“Now that the borders are open and new health and safety guidelines are in place, travel is once again high on the list for Americans who are ready to reunite with their loved ones for the holiday,” said Paula Twidale, senior vice president of AAA Travel.

Locally, businesses dependent on travel and tourism are acknowledging concerns about higher prices at the pump, but overall expectations are for a busier holiday season than last year.

“We’re anticipating people truly getting out to see family and do some things and get into some more of our events,” said Mark Thacker, executive director of the Anderson Madison County Visitors Bureau. “There are concerns with gas prices, there are concerns with rising levels of COVID. But there are a lot of events coming up, shopping season is coming up, so we anticipate it to be positive numbers.”

Thacker said as people look for flexibility in their lodging and try to stay close to family, local AirBnB’s could see a significant uptick in activity.

“There is pent-up energy for travel,” he said. “I imagine you’re probably going to see people wanting to stay closer to home, closer to family, but you’ll probably see more activation with AirBnB’s as well with a small uptick in hotels.”

Follow Andy Knight on Twitter @Andrew_J_Knight, or call 765-640-4809.





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Experts expect heightened holiday travel, but COVID, gas price concerns remain | News


ANDERSON — Roads and airports should be noticeably busier this week, but travel industry experts are still wary that many Americans, concerned about rising gas prices, will choose to stay at home again this Thanksgiving.

“While vaccines have helped travelers feel more comfortable, rising gas prices and continued concerns about the pandemic are making many Americans hesitant to travel during the holidays,” Chip Rogers, president and CEO of the American Hotel & Lodging Association, said in a news release this week.

An AHLA survey conducted over three days near the end of October found that 29% of Americans are likely to travel for Thanksgiving and 33% are likely to travel for Christmas — an increase from 21% and 24%, respectively, compared to 2020. But industry experts worry that, for those who do plan to travel over the holidays and expect to drive, rising gas prices may dampen those plans.

The holiday travel forecast from the American Automobile Association (AAA) strikes a more optimistic tone, predicting that about 53.4 million people will travel for Thanksgiving this year, up 13% from 2020. AAA expects as many as 6.4 million more travelers on the roads and at airports this year.

“Now that the borders are open and new health and safety guidelines are in place, travel is once again high on the list for Americans who are ready to reunite with their loved ones for the holiday,” said Paula Twidale, senior vice president of AAA Travel.

Locally, businesses dependent on travel and tourism are acknowledging concerns about higher prices at the pump, but overall expectations are for a busier holiday season than last year.

“We’re anticipating people truly getting out to see family and do some things and get into some more of our events,” said Mark Thacker, executive director of the Anderson Madison County Visitors Bureau. “There are concerns with gas prices, there are concerns with rising levels of COVID. But there are a lot of events coming up, shopping season is coming up, so we anticipate it to be positive numbers.”

Thacker said as people look for flexibility in their lodging and try to stay close to family, local AirBnB’s could see a significant uptick in activity.

“There is pent-up energy for travel,” he said. “I imagine you’re probably going to see people wanting to stay closer to home, closer to family, but you’ll probably see more activation with AirBnB’s as well with a small uptick in hotels.”

Follow Andy Knight on Twitter @Andrew_J_Knight, or call 765-640-4809.





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Gas prices up $1.30 over 2020 as travel rapidly increases prior to holidays


CHICAGO — As the holiday season approaches, national gas prices have surged to an average of $3.41 per gallon, an increase of $1.30 over the 2020 average at this time of year.

With many more Americans expected to hit the road for Thanksgiving, air travel is expected to increase 80 percent as well, according to AAA.

Republicans are placing blame on the Biden administration for the increases, urging him to tap into more oil reserves and adapt more friendly policies toward fossil fuel companies.

Democrats are accusing oil companies of price-gouging with the increased demand, pointing to the decreased cost of refining oil in the past year.

Local travel experts advise against traveling on the roads in the Chicago area between noon and 8 p.m. on Wednesday and after 1 p.m. on Sunday due to increased congestion on area expressways.



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Canadian province sets gas, travel restrictions after floods


VANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) — The British Columbia government announced Friday it is limiting the amount of fuel people can purchase at gas stations in some parts of the province and is restricting non-essential travel as highways begin to reopen following torrential rains that caused floods and mudslides.

Provincial Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth said non-essential vehicles will be limited to about 8 gallons (30 liters) per trip to the gas station. The order is expected to last until Dec. 1.

“These steps will keep commercial traffic moving, stabilize our supply chains and make sure everyone gets home safely,” Farnworth told a news conference. “We are asking people not to travel through severely affected areas, for their own well-being, but also to make sure the fuel we do have goes toward the services people need in this time of crisis.”

The precautionary closure of the Trans Mountain Pipeline during the flooding has raised concerns about a fuel shortage in province’s Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island. Assessments of the pipeline continue.

The government also has prohibited non-essential travel on sections of highways 99, 3 and 7.

Transportation Minister Rob Fleming said vehicles transporting essential products or delivering vital services can use the highways. So can people returning to their principle residents after being stranded.

“It is not open to recreational or non-essential travel,” he said.

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Gas prices drop ahead of busy Thanksgiving travel week | Local News


The statewide gas price average in Texas is $3.03 for a gallon of regular unleaded fuel, according to the AAA Texas Weekend Gas Watch. That price is four cents less than on this day last week and is $1.23 more per gallon compared to this day last year. 

Of the major metropolitan areas surveyed in Texas, drivers in El Paso are paying the most on average at $3.22 per gallon while drivers in Amarillo are paying the least at $2.87 per gallon. Drivers in Walker County are paying an average of $3.06 per gallon. 

The national average price for a gallon of regular unleaded is $3.41, which is one cent less when compared to this day last week and $1.29 more than the price per gallon at this same time last year.

AAA Texas anticipates near pre-pandemic levels of travel during the Thanksgiving holiday period next week. Millions of drivers across Texas will be paying approximately $1.15 to $1.25 more for a gallon of gas than they would have if they traveled for Thanksgiving in 2020. Many people stayed home last year, but that certainly won’t be the case this year. In fact, with millions more of Americans opting to travel again after getting the COVID-19 vaccine, demand for crude oil and gasoline has increased substantially over this time last year and throughout most of this year. The increase in demand comes as the world reopens and has led to higher crude oil prices and furthermore higher retail gasoline prices for much of 2021.

However, for the first time in months oil prices started to slip below $80 a barrel in recent days. On Thursday, the price of crude fell to six-week lows after the Biden administration requested that China, Japan and South Korea release their strategic oil reserves. While crude oil and gas prices had already started falling earlier in the week due to a slight drop in demand, it’s still too early to say if prices will continue to drop leading into the busy Thanksgiving travel period. The silver lining for Texas drivers—this is the first time the statewide gas price average experienced a weekly drop in seven weeks.

“Texas drivers can be thankful that retail gas prices are starting to drop, but we won’t see anything close to the prices from Thanksgiving 2020. However, there are some simple steps drivers can take get the most bang for their buck when filling up for their holiday road trip,” said AAA Texas spokesperson Daniel Armbruster. “One of the easiest ways to save is to maintain your car according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Regular service will ensure optimum fuel economy, performance and longevity.”

Gas Price Impact on Thanksgiving Travel

While gas prices will be much more expensive than last year, the higher prices are not expected to deter holiday travelers. AAA predicts an estimated 3.6 million Texans will drive 50 miles or more to their Thanksgiving destination. Furthermore, drivers in Texas are paying the 2nd lowest gas price average in the country, according to gasprices.aaa.com.





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Schumer calls for feds to ease gas prices ahead of holiday travel


STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — With gas prices continuing to climb across the United States, Sen. Charles Schumer (D-New York) is calling for the federal government to tap into the nation’s Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to reduce prices at the pump ahead of holiday travel.

Schumer called on the Biden administration to move forward with sales from this reserve, noting consumers need immediate relief from rising gas prices caused, in part, by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic’s shock to the global supply chain.

“COVID has wreaked havoc on all of our supply chains, no industry spared, with fuel supply and prices at the top of the list,” said Schumer in a news release. “Consumers need immediate relief at the gas pump, and so I am urging the administration to approve fuel sales from the nation’s strategic petroleum reserve. The plan is not a cure-all, because we also need a real solution to this problem of price shocks from wildly fluctuating fossil fuels, but it can help ease prices ahead of holiday travel.”

He pointed to AAA, which reported that the national average gas price currently is $3.41, up from $2.12 a year ago at this time.

The senator explained there needs to be a real solution to the issue, and that implementing Build Back Better would help all Americans move off the dependence on fossil fuels to cleaner, cheaper, and more reliable electric cars and appliances. In the meantime, he said, tapping some of the reserves’ 600 million barrels can help pump relief at current prices.

“Bottom line, we must implement Build Back Better to help all Americans move off our dependence on fossil fuels to cleaner, cheaper and more reliable electric cars and appliances. The Build Back Better Act includes my ‘Clean Cars for America’ program, which would make electric cars cheaper than gas cars, and would allow consumers to worry less and less about rising gas prices,” Schumer added.

The SPR is the world’s largest supply of emergency crude oil, according to the SPR website. It was established to reduce the impact of disruptions in supplies of petroleum products and to out obligations of the United States under the international energy program. The oil is stored underground at different sites along the coastline of the Gulf of Mexico.

The SPR can hold 714 million barrels of oil. Currently, it’s holding approximately 600 million barrels.

An emergency withdrawal from the SPR has only occurred three times in its history. The first was in 1991 during President George H. W. Bush’s administration’s Operation Desert Storm and the second was in 2005 as part of President George W. Bush’s response to Hurricane Katrina.

The third and most recent withdrawal was in 2011, as part of a response to a loss of crude oil due to supply disruptions in various countries.

Schumer said the COVID-19 pandemic’s supply chain disruptions should warrant an SPR withdrawal.

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High gas prices unlikely to hurt Thanksgiving travel, AAA says


Despite rising gas prices, AAA Mid-Atlantic doesn’t expect fuel cost alone will deter Thanksgiving travelers — budget-conscious travelers may cut back on eating out or accommodations.

Gas prices are $1.38 a gallon higher than last year, but that’s unlikely to deter pent-up desire to drive on Thanksgiving trips, according to AAA Mid-Atlantic.

Currently, the average price for a gallon of gasoline is $3.61 — 20 cents more than last month, according to a news release.



Historically, high gas prices alone don’t change a traveler’s plan to drive for Thanksgiving.

“It would stand to reason that those who missed the annual gathering last year may be even more motivated than usual to make the trip, despite the additional expense of filling up,” said Ragina Ali, public and government affairs manager for AAA Mid-Atlantic.

She said travelers typically make other budget arrangements, such as eating out less, or spending less on hotels.

Nationally, the price at the pump continues its slow climb, rising two cents this week, to an average of $3.42. The national average is 16 cents more than last month.

Holiday travelers may want to wait until they are on the road before filling up.

The D.C. area is one of the top 10 most expensive markets in the country for gas, according to AAA.

As for how many people will be traveling, AAA projects more than 53.4 million, which the group said is the highest single-year increase since 2005, and an increase of 13% compared to 2020.

And 90% of that 53.4 million will be on the road.

“This Thanksgiving, travel will look a lot different than last year,” Ali said. “Now that the borders are open and new health and safety guidelines are in place, travel is once again high on the list for Americans who are ready to reunite with their loved ones for the holiday.”

In a news release, AAA said travelers in major metro areas could see more than double the delays they usually experience.

“Thanksgiving is one of the busiest holidays for road trips and this year will be no different even during the pandemic,” INRIX Transportation Analyst Bob Pishue said. “Drivers around major metros must be prepared for significant delays, especially Wednesday afternoon. Knowing when and where congestion will build can help drivers avoid the stress of sitting in traffic.”

Below are the worst times to travel by metro area.

Worst Corridors and Times to Travel
Metro Area Corridor Peak Congestion % Over Normal
Atlanta I-85 S, Clairmont Rd to MLK Dr Wednesday, 1:30 – 3:30PM 340%
Boston I-93 N, Quincy Market to MA-28 Wednesday, 1:00 – 3:00PM 240%
Chicago I-290 W, Morgan St to Wolfe Rd Wednesday, 2:45 – 4:45PM 329%
Detroit I-96 W, 6 Mile Rd to Walled Lake Wednesday, 2:00 – 4:00PM 211%
Houston I-10 W, Sjolander Rd to TX-330 Wednesday, 3:15 – 5:15PM 344%
Los Angeles I-5 S, Colorado St to Florence Ave Wednesday, 3:45 – 5:45PM 385%
New York I-495 E, Borden Ave to Little Neck Pkwy Wednesday, 2:30 – 4:30PM 482%
San Francisco I-80 E, I-580 to San Pablo Dam Rd Wednesday, 4:00 – 6:00PM 278%
Seattle I-5 S, WA-18 to WA-7 Wednesday, 4:00 – 6:00PM 257%
Washington DC I-95 S, I-395 to VA-123 Wednesday, 2:00 – 4:00PM 230%
Source: INRIX

WTOP’s Will Vitka contributed to this report.

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High gas prices, crowded airports could impact holiday travel plans – Boston 25 News


BOSTON — Packed airports and pricey gas are two current trends that could impact holiday travel plans.

Last year at this time, many people wondered if they could safely gather with their extended family as the coronavirus raged unchecked.

This year, they’re trying to figure out if they can even afford to get there.

Just look at what’s been happening with the price of gas. “We’re actually about $1.20 higher than we were last year in Massachusetts, and the average driver is now paying about $17 more per fill-up per tank,” explained Mary Maguire, Director of Public and Legislative Affairs for AAA-Northeast.

That spike in gas prices comes just as Americans are thinking about their plans for the holidays.

According to the PwC Holiday Outlook 2021, 72% say they plan to drive to their destination.

40% say they will fly, while 13% will board a bus.

The numbers exceed 100% because many trips use multiple forms of transportation.

Higher gas prices, at least at their current levels, aren’t expected to keep people home this year.

“I think people will grin and bear it and go,” Maguire said. “I mean, frankly, I think there’s a lot of pent-up demand for people who want to travel.”

Maguire added that drivers can help themselves save money at the pump with some simple measures, like making sure to buy regular gas.

Going a little bit slower increases fuel efficiency. Making sure tires are properly inflated will “improve fuel efficiency by 3-4%,” according to Maguire.

She also says it’s worth comparing prices as it’s not hard to find a service station that might be a little less expensive. She suggests using free apps.

Taking to the sky to avoid the roads could raise its own issues this year.

The Southwest Airlines meltdown early last month stranded thousands as hundreds of flights were abruptly canceled.

Some airports, like Denver, have been overwhelmed with crowds this fall.

All this is having a chilling effect on some travelers at Logan Airport.

One woman said she was concerned about flying because of what happened with Southwest.

Another woman said, “We don’t plan on traveling over the holidays, we’re taking that into account.”

Patrick Gourley, Ph.D., a professor of economics at the University of New Haven who follows the aviation industry, said he sees ticket costs going up.

Gourley has a strategy to make sure he gets the date he wants at the best price. “One thing you can always do is, depending on the terms and conditions, is book a refundable ticket now, and then once it gets closer to the flight, just cancel the refundable ticket and book the cheaper non-refundable one.”

Overall, Gourley says it’s a good sign that Southwest’s problems didn’t spread to other carriers. “I don’t think it’s going to be widespread. I think the airlines have plans in place. They know travel is going to pick up over the holidays and they’ve been doing this for years.

One man traveling at Logan told us he’s most concerned about the way passengers are behaving these days. He hopes they remember the spirit of the holidays and don’t make a bad situation worse.

“They need to be tolerant. They shouldn’t throw coffee into somebody’s face.”

Gourley pointed out the holidays aren’t actually the busiest time of year for the airlines. That occurs in the summer.

He says it can seem more hectic now because a lot of families are flying with children and there are more people who don’t tend to fly as often. These groups don’t move as efficiently as business travelers.

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