7 Small French Towns That Could Star In A Hallmark Movie


In North America, Hallmark movies have become part of the Christmas tradition, a celebratory viewing of feel-good movies together with the whole family while snuggled on the couch, with Christmas decorations surrounding you. But what about those of us who want to travel over the holiday season, but would still like that warm feel-good feeling that small, Christmassy towns give you in the films?

If you find yourself in France, fret not, there are plenty of small, friendly towns and villages that give you that Christmas cheer and charm. I have selected some of my favorite places that give you a warm fuzzy feeling, with a quaintness that makes your heart soar, and doubly so around Christmas time.

Here are some not to be missed.

Amazing house near the small picturesque waterfall in Moret-sur-Loing.
Kiev.Victor / Shutterstock.com

1. Moret-sur-Loing

Picture yourself walking through medieval city gates, across an ancient bridge, looking down to an old watermill sitting in the middle of the river. Nearby are restaurants looking out over the river, and a main street decorated with pretty lights. Moret-sur-Loing lies on the perimeter of the Fontainebleau Forest and is picture perfect. If you ever wanted to send a Hallmark postcard from France, the view from the bridge at Moret-sur-Loing would certainly be on the front. Not surprising that the painter Sisley was inspired by the town, and you can follow in his footsteps on a private walking tour hitting all the scenic spots. 

Pro Tip: While walking along the Loing River will occupy you for a while, this is a small, if hugely quaint town, so why not combine it with nearby, and also rather pretty, but a bit more lively Fontainebleau?

Exterior of La Petite France, Strasbourg.
Ulrike Lemmin-Woolfrey

2. La Petite France, Strasbourg

Strasbourg is well known for its Christmas cheer, but when it comes to Hallmark movie-perfect settings, head straight to the old quarter by the river. La Petite France was, in the Middle Ages, the home of the tanners, because of its proximity to the river Ill. In those days, I am sure it was not a desirable place to be, with the tightly huddled houses, narrow lanes, tiny squares, and those smells. Today, Petite France is not just a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but at Christmastime, it is still the same as centuries ago, but much improved. Tightly packed half-timbered buildings, all a little crooked, tiny squares filled with huts and stalls and twinkling trees, and the smells lingering in the air are that of mulled wine, hot chocolate, sausages with sauerkraut, and plenty of sweet things. The river is now clean and gurgling through locks and a double-decker 17th-century dam. Add covered bridges, and the cutest houses on little peninsulas right in the river, and you have probably found the most Hallmark movie spot in France. I would never suggest that you don’t look at the whole of Strasbourg, it is so lovely, but La Petite France is where you could easily imagine a film crew capturing the utter prettiness and charm of this quarter. And, you have a good chance of it snowing at Christmas.

Pro Tip: To really soak up the romance of Petite France, stay at the Hotel & Spa Regent Petite France located in a 17th-century former watermill, and you will be right in the movie.

Produce and fruit stand in St-Germain-en-Laye.
Ulrike Lemmin-Woolfrey

3. Saint-Germain-en-Laye

Saint-Germain-en-Laye is a community just across the Seine from Paris. Perched high on a hill, with Paris stretching out below, not only are the views movie-appropriate but so is the small town. The marketplace of St-Germain-en-Laye is filled with a gorgeous selection of fresh food and produce stalls every Tuesday, Friday, and Sunday, and together with the narrow, cobbled streets that lead out to a grand castle and those views across Paris, are reason enough to love this community. But add the Christmas sparkle and the Christmas Village which has the backdrop of the chateau, and it gets very picturesque indeed. This is the place many choose to live in preference to central Paris, mostly because of the community, charm, and quaintness, all within a 20-minute RER A train ride of Paris.

Pro Tip: Sit with coffee and a croissant on the terrace of Café de l’Industrie, at the back of the market square, and watch the hustle and bustle, and you will see why this community is included. Everybody knows everybody else, stopping to chat, and then go about their daily business, and you can just imagine a Hallmark plot taking place here.

4. The Saint-Louis Quarter, Versailles

Versailles is beautiful at Christmas, but for that extra touch of charm, away from the rather grandiose palace, head to the Saint-Louis Quarter. Here you find no imposing grandeur, nor rugged medieval history, but the superbly quaint and charming “Carrés Saint-Louis.” A village within the small town of Versailles, so very different from the rest of the town. There are squares hemmed by tiny buildings, the ground floor usually housing an individual boutique, an art gallery, an artisan workshop, or a small café, and on the floor above, former living accommodations. All painted in beautiful colors, and too cute for words, these little buildings cover a few blocks. They surround picturesque squares where children play and old people sit and chat and were constructed under Louis XV as accommodation for a new market, still perfectly retaining their unique charm that would be a perfect setting for a Hallmark movie.

Pro Tip: Stay within Saint-Louis so as to not lose that Christmassy feeling and sleep in the small and utterly romantic Hotel Berry.

exterior of Dijon.
Ulrike Lemmin-Woolfrey

5. Dijon

Dijon has so many cutesy corners, crooked half-timbered houses, and small historic spots, that it is always a delight. But at Christmastime, all these special little corners are lit up, filled with market stalls, and turn into a Christmas wonderland. Especially the corner of Place Francois Rude, nearly too charming for words.

Place Darcy and Rue de la Liberté contain around 60 chalets selling beautiful arts and crafts and offering the best of Dijon’s famous cuisine, which is even better when sampled in winter. Who can beat a warming beef bourguignon? For that little bit of an extra special treat at Christmas, head to the truffle market held in the market hall.

The pretty market hall, designed by Monsieur Gustave Eiffel of tower fame, is one of the most iconic would-be Hallmark movie locations, with families doing their seasonal shopping, people meeting friends at the various stands over a glass of wine, and everything twinkling with pretty lights.

Pro Tip: For that old-world charm, stay at the Maison Philippe le Bon, which is a lovely hotel in the center, which has kept the old features of the house and enhanced them with modern touches. The restaurant is superb, too.

Reims Christmas decorations.
Ulrike Lemmin-Woolfrey

6. Reims

The capital of France’s Champagne region comes into its best at Christmas, with a Christmas market huddled around the ancient cathedral where France’s kings were crowned. Ignoring the rest of the city, however lovely and historic, and just strolling through the market, with its miniature train, Christmas trees everywhere, chalets full of mulled wine and warming food, and stalls of pretty Christmas decorations hand-crafted in the region, gets that warm fuzzy feeling going pretty quickly. Families are walking hand-in-hand, enjoying the miniature fairground and the large snow globe where Santa resides, and Christmas cheer is everywhere. What makes Reims stand out when it comes to potentially starring in a Hallmark movie, are the small champagne outlets that pop up throughout the market. Cozy little corners where you are provided with a warm blanket and a flute of champagne, and you can just visualize someone meeting up with the (future) love of their life.

Pro Tip: For a lovely, cozy meal after walking around the city, pop into the romantic L’Alambic for dinner.

The Place du Tertre with tables of cafe and the Sacre-Coeur in the morning, quarter Montmartre in Paris.
France kavalenkava / Shutterstock.com

7. Montmartre, Paris

Ask anybody, and most people will say that Montmartre is their favorite neighborhood in Paris. And the reason? Because it is a perfectly preserved village within a large city. Perched on the hill Butte Montmartre, it not only offers great views but is distinctly different and separate from the rest of Paris. At Christmas time, this village is prettier than ever. Even the carousel, which always stands at the bottom of the steep steps up to Sacre Coeur, looks prettier at Christmas if that is possible. But twinkling lights, stalls, and decorations enhance every feature of this neighborhood and if you cannot imagine a romantic girl-find-boy movie set right on Place du Tertre, the one with all the artists exhibiting their wares, then you don’t have a romantic bone in your body. On Place des Abbesses, the one with the gorgeous metro stop, a Christmas market takes over the square, and you can wander from there past the small shops and cafes and find yourself in movieland — quite literally, because this is where Amelie was filmed.Pro Tip: To soak up the atmosphere and run your own film edits in your head while watching life go on at Place du Tertre, sit in La Mer Catherine, one of the oldest restaurants in Montmartre, dating to 1793.

Visiting France at Christmas offers opportunities for other activities:



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Martinique Asks Tourists to Leave As French Caribbean Returns to Lockdown




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French parliament approves COVID-19 passes for restaurants, domestic travel


France’s parliament has approved a bill that will mandate COVID-19 passes for those traveling within the country and will require health care workers to get the vaccine by mid-September, The Associated Press reported.

The bill, which was introduced six days ago, requires people to show “health passes” in order to be on planes, trains or go to restaurants and other public places. French residents have to either prove that they are vaccinated, recently covered from the coronavirus or show a recent negative COVID-19 test, the wire service reported.

The bill currently applies to adults, but it will soon expand to residents aged 12 years and up beginning on Sept. 30. 

For those working in health care, workers face suspension if they do not receive the vaccine by Sept. 15. The measures could remain effective through Nov. 15, though it will depend on the prevalence of the coronavirus in the country.

Lawmakers approved the bill early on Monday local time, the wire service reported.

The bill echoes an announcement French President Emmanuel MacronEmmanuel Jean-Michel MacronUS athletes chant ‘Dr. Biden’ as first lady cheers swimmers Jill Biden watches Olympic basketball with France’s Macron Jill Biden attends Tokyo Olympics opening ceremony MORE made earlier this month regarding the COVID-19 measures as the country aims to tackle high daily COVID-19 case counts and a relatively low vaccination rate.

The country started to see its daily COVID-19 case tick upward toward late June and early July. While the country was reporting new cases in the several thousands, the country reported over 20,000 new cases in recent days, according to data from the World Health Organization (WHO).

On Saturday, France had 21,769 new cases as opposed to 3,583 cases a week ago on July 16, according to WHO data.

Data from John Hopkins University shows that only 44 percent of France’s population is fully vaccinated.

Despite this, tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets of France to protest the bill. Around 160,000 people protested on Saturday alone, according to the AP. Though the demonstrations were largely peaceful, nine were arrested in clashes between police and protesters.





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French president foresees some summer tourists in Paris | National News


PARIS (AP) — French President Emmanuel Macron says he foresees at least some tourists returning to Paris this summer if they have gotten vaccinated or have proof of testing negative for the coronavirus as France moves to progressively lift infection-control restrictions.

“We are building a certificate to facilitate travel after these restrictions between the different European countries with testing and vaccination,” Macron said in an interview that aired Sunday on the CBS News show “Face the Nation.”

Macron spoke as the French government is preparing to impose tough, new entry restrictions on travelers from four countries — Argentina, Chile, South Africa and Brazil — in hopes of keeping out especially contagious virus variants. The number of countries on the list could grow, France’s foreign minister said Saturday.

The restrictions include mandatory 10-day quarantines with police checks to ensure people arriving in France observe the requirement. Travelers from all four countries will be restricted to French nationals and their families, EU citizens and others with a permanent home in France.

France previously suspended all flights from Brazil. The suspension will be lifted next Saturday, after 10 days, and the new restrictions “progressively” put in place by then, the government said. The flight suspension for Brazil will be lifted followed by the “drastic measures” for entering France from all four countries, plus the French territory of Guiana, French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said.

Macron, summarizing the French approach, said “the plan is always to control the virus, to maximize the vaccination and to progressively lift the restrictions.”

France has been among the hardest hit European countries and is now guarding against highly contageous variants, notably deciding to target four countries at present.

The four countries “are the most dangerous in terms of the number of variants that exist and in the evolution of the pandemic in these countries,” Le Drian said Saturday on the France 3 television station.

The list of countries subject to tougher border checks could be extended, he said.

Under the new restrictions, travelers must provide an address for where they plan to observe the 10-day confinement period and police will make visits and fine those who are found in violation, the government said.

Along with the mandatory quarantine, France is requiring more stringent testing for the coronavirus. Travelers must show proof of a negative PCR test taken less than 36 hours instead of 72 hours before they boarded a flight, or a negative antigen test less than 24 hours

France has reported the deaths of 100,00 people in the COVID-19 pandemic.

A variant first identified in England spread to continental Europe and is now responsible for about 80% of the virus cases in France, while the variants first seen in Brazil and South Africa make up less than 4% of French infections, Health Minister Olivier Veran said last week.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.



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French President Foresees Some Summer Tourists in Paris | Health News


PARIS (AP) — French President Emmanuel Macron says he foresees at least some tourists returning to Paris this summer if they have gotten vaccinated or have proof of testing negative for the coronavirus as France moves to progressively lift infection-control restrictions.

“We are building a certificate to facilitate travel after these restrictions between the different European countries with testing and vaccination,” Macron said in an interview that aired Sunday on the CBS News show “Face the Nation.”

Macron spoke as the French government is preparing to impose tough, new entry restrictions on travelers from four countries — Argentina, Chile, South Africa and Brazil — in hopes of keeping out especially contagious virus variants. The number of countries on the list could grow, France’s foreign minister said Saturday.

The restrictions include mandatory 10-day quarantines with police checks to ensure people arriving in France observe the requirement. Travelers from all four countries will be restricted to French nationals and their families, EU citizens and others with a permanent home in France.

France previously suspended all flights from Brazil. The suspension will be lifted next Saturday, after 10 days, and the new restrictions “progressively” put in place by then, the government said. The flight suspension for Brazil will be lifted followed by the “drastic measures” for entering France from all four countries, plus the French territory of Guiana, French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said.

Macron, summarizing the French approach, said “the plan is always to control the virus, to maximize the vaccination and to progressively lift the restrictions.”

France has been among the hardest hit European countries and is now guarding against highly contageous variants, notably deciding to target four countries at present.

The four countries “are the most dangerous in terms of the number of variants that exist and in the evolution of the pandemic in these countries,” Le Drian said Saturday on the France 3 television station.

The list of countries subject to tougher border checks could be extended, he said.

Under the new restrictions, travelers must provide an address for where they plan to observe the 10-day confinement period and police will make visits and fine those who are found in violation, the government said.

Along with the mandatory quarantine, France is requiring more stringent testing for the coronavirus. Travelers must show proof of a negative PCR test taken less than 36 hours instead of 72 hours before they boarded a flight, or a negative antigen test less than 24 hours

France has reported the deaths of 100,00 people in the COVID-19 pandemic.

A variant first identified in England spread to continental Europe and is now responsible for about 80% of the virus cases in France, while the variants first seen in Brazil and South Africa make up less than 4% of French infections, Health Minister Olivier Veran said last week.

Follow all of AP’s pandemic coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic, https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-vaccine

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



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Germany Limits Travel From French Region Over Virus Variant | Business News


BERLIN (AP) — Germany announced Sunday that travelers from France’s northeastern Moselle region will face additional restrictions due to the high rate of variant coronavirus cases there.

Germany’s disease control agency, the Robert Koch Institute, said it would add Moselle to the list of “variant of concern” areas that already includes countries such as the Czech Republic, Portugal and the United Kingdom.

Travelers from those areas must produce a recent negative coronavirus test before entering Germany.

The Moselle region in northeastern France includes the city of Metz and borders the German states of Saarland and Rhineland-Palatinate.

Clement Beaune, the French minister for European affairs, said France regrets the decision and is in negotiations with Germany to try to lighten the measures for 16,000 inhabitants of Moselle who work across the border. Specifically, he said France does not want them to face the daily PCR virus tests that Germany has applied elsewhere to travelers along some borders.

“We don’t want that,” he said.

He said France is pushing for the use of easier, faster testing methods and for tests every 2-3 days rather than daily. More talks were expected later Sunday, he said.

The Robert Koch Institute recorded 7,890 newly confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Germany over the past day, taking the total to over 2.4 million cases. The death toll rose by 157 to 70,045.

Follow all of AP’s pandemic coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic, https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-vaccine and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



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French search for British hiker may be postponed until spring | UK news


French police say they will probably have to wait until spring to continue the search for a British hiker who went missing late last year in the Pyrenees.

Esther Dingley, 37, had been walking alone in the mountains near the border between Spain and France and was last seen on 22 November.

French police captain Jean Marc Bordinaro told the Times “all possible investigations” in French territory had been carried out “without any result”.

He said: “We have no indication permitting us to confirm the presence of Esther Dingley in France since she was seen for the last time on the Spanish side of the Pic de Sauvegarde. We’ll probably have to wait till spring to undertake more searches.”

Dingley’s partner, Daniel Colegate, who had been hiking with her but was house-sitting at a French farmhouse on 22 November, said earlier this month he did not believe she fell or had some other kind of accident.

He also dismissed suggestions she could have voluntarily disappeared.

Writing on Facebook, Colegate denied the suggestion Dingley would spark a major search operation by vanishing, rather than simply telling him she needed time alone. He said: “All of which leads me to believe that somebody else has been involved in Esther’s disappearance and against her will.

“This is a terrifying prospect and I wish I could believe otherwise, but I cannot.”

The couple, who have been together for almost 19 years, met at Oxford University and lived in Durham before they set off travelling around Europe in a camper van six years ago.



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New French, Czech, and German Travel Restrictions


As the number of COVID-19 infections continues to climb and highly contagious variants of the virus have emerged, some countries are imposing new travel restrictions.

Breaking News: This trending news development is making news headlines at this time:


France is prohibiting all travel to and from non-European Union countries. Under the new policy beginning Sunday, travelers from EU countries seeking entry into France will have to provide evidence of a negative coronavirus test.

Travelers from several European and African nations — Brazil, Britain, Eswatini, Ireland, Lesotho, Portugal, and South Africa – will not be allowed into Germany. However, German residents traveling from those countries will be granted entry, even if they test positive for the coronavirus virus.

France, Germany and the Czech Republic said Friday they will restrict in-and outbound travel amid concerns about more contagious strains of the coronavirus spreading across the European Union.

The French PM added that more transmissible UK and South African strains pose a “great risk” of a surge in virus cases in the republic, he warned, adding that all big shopping malls will be shut and clients of smaller ones will be spaced further out starting next week.

The German government said it would bar most travelers from countries reporting more contagious coronavirus variants from coming in starting Saturday.

The Czech Republic will ban all non-essential travel to the country starting midnight. Exceptions include people traveling for work and studies and those who have a temporary or permanent residence permit.



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UK travel news latest: Covid testing deal opens French border


Truck driver criticises government’s handling of France border crisis

The first passengers arrived in France from the UK overnight as part of a deal to restore travel between the two countries after a wave of bans left travellers stranded and supply lines severed.

A mass testing programme for lorry drivers will get underway on Wednesday to alleviate congestion at ports after an agreement was reached to reopen the border between France and the UK.  French authorities announced that journeys from the UK will be allowed to resume after the coronavirus ban was lifted, but those seeking to travel must have a negative test result. The Netherlands also announced they were relaxing restrictions for travellers who could present a negative test result.

Meanwhile, snowfall in the north of England on Wednesday was causing problems on the roads while the Met Office said strong winds forecast for Boxing Day could lead to further transport disruption.

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Hauliers urged not to travel to Kent despite border reopening

Priti Patel has urged lorry drivers to stay away from Kent after the border reopened with France. 

The home secretary tweeted: “The UK-French border is reopening. Priority is to get lorries moving & mass testing is underway.

“We urge hauliers not to travel to Kent as we work to alleviate congestion – travelling now will slow things down. Tourist travellers who are not French residents should not travel.”

Tom Batchelor23 December 2020 12:44

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Finland cancels UK flights until 4 January

The Finnish Transport and Communications Agency, Traficom, has decided to suspend air passenger flights from the UK to Finland until 4 January. 

It said that due to the decision, many travellers’ return to Finland will be “difficult or prevented altogether”.

A statement on Finland’s Foreign Ministry website said: “Traficom decided to ban flights to prevent the spread of the new variant of coronavirus to Finland. The ban applies to all flights, including repatriation flights.  

”In the early phases of the pandemic in the spring, the government decided to organise repatriation flights because air traffic was suddenly suspended all over the world. 

“Now that people have been aware of the situation and the consequent travel recommendations for a long time, we are not planning repatriation flights.

“Travellers should primarily sort out their possibilities to return to Finland independently but, at present, it may be difficult to find any connections. 

“Many travellers may have to stay at their travel destination until passenger airlines resume their regular operations.”

Tom Batchelor23 December 2020 12:25

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Calls for Northern Ireland airport to close due to coronavirus fears

Amid concern that City of Derry airport is being used by British travellers as a “back door” to the European Union, councillors in northwest Northern Ireland say the gateway should close to passengers to prevent “a grave risk” to local people, writes Simon Calder. 

Paul Gallagher and Gary Donnelly, both independents councillors, have secured an emergency meeting of Derry City and Strabane Council on 29 December to discuss the threat posed by the new variant of coronavirus – and the alleged behaviour of some travellers.

Tom Batchelor23 December 2020 12:16

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Travel bans ‘largely ineffective’, says virologist

Imposing “onerous travel restrictions alone” is unlikely to make a significant impact on the spread of the virus, a virologist has argued.

Writing in The Guardian, Angela Rasmussen, of the Georgetown Center for Global Health Science and Security, said restrictions on transport “reflects a simplistic understanding of how viruses spread and evolve”.

She wrote: “Rather than harsh and largely ineffective travel bans, we should instead focus on encouraging compliance with proven interventions such as masking, distancing, avoiding crowds and enclosed spaces, avoiding gathering outside of one’s household or quarantine pod, and practising good hand hygiene.”

Tom Batchelor23 December 2020 12:13

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Arrest in Dover amid clashes between drivers and police

A man has been arrested after disturbances in Dover and the nearby Manston lorry park.

The man is being held for obstructing a highway in Dover, Kent Police said.

A spokesman added: “Officers on the ground at both locations are working with partner agencies to make sure those hoping to travel to the continent adhere to the latest Government travel requirements regarding Covid testing.”

Some lorry drivers clashed with police early on Wednesday in Dover as they continued to be held up because of the impact of the now-lifted French travel ban.

Tom Batchelor23 December 2020 11:50

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Issues at the ports highlight what could be on the horizon in Brexit Britain | Editorial

No one now can be in any doubt about how vital the channel ports are to commerce on both sides, and how dangerous it will be when the current “frictionless trade” comes to an end.

Read the full editorial here: 

Tom Batchelor23 December 2020 11:42

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Strong winds threaten Boxing Day transport disruption

The Met Office is warning that strong winds forecast on Boxing Day across the whole of England and Wales could cause transport disruption. 

Exposed coasts and hills could see winds of up to 80mph while 50-60mph is likely for many from 3pm on Saturday until midday on Sunday.

Tom Batchelor23 December 2020 11:23

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Australians offered help to get home

The Australian High Commission in the United Kingdom is offering help to citizens to travel back from the UK, after key transit routes via Singapore and Hong Kong were closed off by travel bans. 

“We will begin to contact affected Australians, who advised us of their disruption, today,” the statement said. 

“We will be offering them support to get home including by connecting affected Australians with alternate tickets on other airlines, utilising surge capacity on other carriers into Australian jurisdictions with quarantine capacity and by making more space available on facilitated commercial flights.

“This isn’t the end of the measures we’re putting in place, we thank you for your patience while we work through these arrangements.” 

There have been reports of Australians left stranded after Singapore shut its doors to UK arrivals this week. 

Jacob Marchett, 26, had just finished a two-year teaching contract and ended the lease on his home in order to travel back to Melbourne on Christmas Eve. But his flight with Singapore Airlines has now been cancelled. 

His family told The Sydney Morning Herald: “We just want our kid home for New Years and Christmas. We haven’t seen our son for two years. He would have gone into quarantine but he still would have been back.”

Tom Batchelor23 December 2020 11:10

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Cuba demands PCR tests from 2021

From the New Year, Cuba will demand a negative PCR Covid test result taken within 72 hours before travel at an accredited testing centre from all international arrivals, writes Simon Calder

Children are not exempt. A second test will be conducted on arrival.

“You should not use the NHS testing services to get a test in order to facilitate your travel to another country,” says the British government.

Cuba is one of relative few nations from which travellers need not quarantine on return to the UK. 

La Rampa street in the Vedado district of Havana, Cuba

(Simon Calder)

Tom Batchelor23 December 2020 10:56

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Snow brings weather warning

Cumbria Police are warning motorists in the Pennines to “take extra care” on the A686 road linking Hartside with Alston, following heavy snowfall, reports Simon Calder.

“Motorists are asked to drive to the road conditions in front of them, which may be slower than the speed limit,” officers say.

Tom Batchelor23 December 2020 10:51



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