Bitterroot Forest offers tips to hunters | Local News


*Leave a trip itinerary with family or friends. If hiking by yourself and don’t have family or friends in the area with whom you could leave an itinerary with, leave an itinerary in the vehicle.

 *Every hunter should carry these “ten essentials”: map, compass, flashlight, extra food and water, extra clothes, sunglasses, first-aid kit, pocketknife, waterproof matches, and fire starter.

*Shooting and/or hunting is prohibited in developed recreation sites and trailheads including Lake Como and Bass Creek Recreation Areas.

*Be aware that there may be bears in the area, store food properly. Also, carcasses should not be closer than 100 yards to your sleeping area.

*Your cell phone can save your life, but don’t depend on having sufficient coverage, particularly in remote parts of the Bitterroot National Forest.

*Follow the ‘Pack It In, Pack It Out’ and ‘Leave No Trace’ principles while camping.

*Campers, hunters, and others are not allowed to camp for more than 16 consecutive days in one location. New camps must be located five air miles from the previous camp.

*Choose a site for a campfire carefully, near water if possible, and clear it of any combustible material. Remember, just because it’s cold in the morning doesn’t mean fires can’t spread quickly! NEVER walk away from a smoldering campfire. ALWAYS make sure a fire is dead out.



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Bitterroot National Forest offers tips to hunters


HAMILTON — The Bitterroot National Forest is offering up some tips for hunters who are planning to head into the backcountry.

  • All hunters during the general rifle season must wear “hunter orange” (hat, cap, vest, jacket, or rain gear) above the waist.  It must be the outermost garment and be visible from all sides.  This is also a good idea for non-hunting Forest visitors this time of year.  Consider putting an orange vest or bright bandana on pets (dogs, horses, etc.) that will be accompanying you as well.
  • Regulations can change yearly and from drainage to drainage.  Know the regulations for the area that you will be hunting.  Printed copies are available anywhere that licenses are sold and can be found online from Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks.  Dumping carcasses on public lands is illegal, unethical and can spread diseases like Chronic Wasting Disease. Click here for more information on preventing the spread of CWD and carcass disposal guidelines.
  • Hunters should treat every firearm as if it were loaded and always point the muzzle in a safe direction.  Be sure of your target, and beyond, and know where your hunting partners are at all times.  Never assume you are alone in the woods.
  • Leave a trip itinerary with family or friends.  If hiking by yourself and don’t have family or friends in the area with whom you could leave an itinerary with, leave an itinerary in the vehicle.
  • Every hunter should carry these “ten essentials”: map, compass, flashlight, extra food and water, extra clothes, sunglasses, first-aid kit, pocketknife, waterproof matches, and fire starter.
  • Shooting and/or hunting is prohibited in developed recreation sites and trailheads including Lake Como and Bass Creek Recreation areas.
  • Be aware that there may be bears in the area, store food properly.  Also, carcasses should not be closer than 100 yards to your sleeping area.
  • Your cell phone can save your life, but don’t depend on having sufficient coverage, particularly in remote parts of the Bitterroot National Forest.
  • Follow the ‘Pack It In, Pack It Out’ and ‘Leave No Trace’ principles while camping.
  • Campers, hunters, and others are not allowed to camp for more than 16 consecutive days in one location.  New camps must be located five air miles from the previous camp.
  • Choose a site for a campfire carefully, near water if possible, and clear it of any combustible material. Remember, just because it’s cold in the morning doesn’t mean fires can’t spread quickly! NEVER walk away from a smoldering campfire. ALWAYS make sure a fire is dead out.
  • Be sure to call one of our offices to get a Bitterroot National Forest map. Our maps are sold in two parts, split into the North and South half of the forest. Maps are $14 each. Office hours are 8am to 4:30pm, Mon-Fri. Forest Service offices are located in Hamilton, Stevensville, Darby, and West Fork. Some offices are currently operating ‘virtually’ due to COVID 19. Please call our office and we would be happy to assist you. Maps can be mailed out or in-person pickup may also be available, depending on location. Forest Visitor Maps can also be purchased online.
  • You can also download Forest Visitor Maps onto your phone or tablet using the Avenza PDF Maps App.  Avenza makes navigating your National Forest easy, as it tracks your location on the map using your device’s internal GPS.  The app also allows you to measure distances or areas, and records waypoints so you can find your way back to that new secret spot.  To learn more, head to the App Store (Apple Devices) or Play Store (Android Devices) on your mobile device and search for the free “Avenza PDF Maps” application.

In order to protect our public lands and natural resources, the Forest would like to remind visitors of the importance of using designated routes. To that end, there have been a number of changes to our road system as a result of the Travel Management Plan. The travel plan designates 2,246 miles of forest roads and trails open to motorized use. These areas are designated on a Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) now available free of charge at all Bitterroot NF offices and online. MVUMs are also available for free at the Avenza Store. The maps identify which areas are open to motorized use, the types of vehicles allowed and any seasonal restrictions that apply.

All forest recreators are responsible for knowing which roads are open to motorized use. A road without a gate, barrier or sign does not imply that the road is open. Seasonal use restrictions are important for wildlife. Please do not ruin another user’s experience to enhance yours.

All vehicles must stay on existing routes and not drive cross-country. Many seasonal use restrictions include the period from October 15 to December 1. These types of restrictions help to reduce hunting pressure on big game animals and allow Fish, Wildlife & Parks to maintain desired elk numbers and herd structure. Do not drive around barricades, gates, or snowdrifts. Barricades and gates are meant to close a road, frequently for the benefit of wildlife. Violations of these closures can result in fines. Check the MVUM for the travel rules in your areas of interest.

People are asked to notify the US Forest Service if a violation or resource issue is observed (example, driving behind a locked gate, camping for more than 16 days, tree blocking road, washout, etc.) If you witness a hunting violation, call (800) TIP-MONT. In case of emergency, dial 911 or contact Ravalli County Sheriff’s Office at (406) 363-3033.

If you use horses, mules, goats, or llamas anywhere on National Forests, you’re required to bring in only certified weed-free hay, cubes, pellets, or grain. In the past, contaminated feed introduced invasive weeds to many prime wildlife backcountry areas. Help stop new invaders from getting started.

Power wash the undercarriage and inside/outside of the bumpers of your trucks, horse trailers, ATV’s, or other vehicles you drive into the hills. Invasive weed seed can travel over a thousand miles on vehicles and bounce out at the wrong time on our rough mountain roads.

In Montana, outfitters and guides must be licensed to operate on federal, state, as well as private lands unless it’s their own. Be sure your guide or outfitter is licensed. Call the Montana Board of Outfitters at (406) 841-2304 or Idaho Outfitter and Guide Licensing Board at (208) 327-7380 for more information.

Finally, beginning this fall, you may see Bitterroot NF employees wearing bright orange vests and working in recreation sites and along Forest Service roads. They are conducting National Visitor Use Monitoring (NVUM) Program surveys which are done every five years. The surveys provide forest managers with an estimate of how many people recreate on federal lands and what activities they engage in while there. All information you give is confidential and the survey is voluntary.

People can contact their local District office for updates and more information.

  • Stevensville Ranger District, 406-777-5461
  • Darby/Sula Ranger District, 406-821-3913
  • West Fork Ranger District, 406-821-3269
  • Supervisor’s Office – Hamilton, 406-363-7100.





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Welsh person travelled to Thetford to fly tip in forest


A person who travelled from the Welsh border to fly-tip in Norfolk has been fined.

It was one of two financial penalties dished out by Breckland District Council for dumping in the area.

A Forestry England ranger passed on information to the council’s enforcement team, which tracked down the culprit responsible for littering at Lynford Water, near Mundford.


Soil fly-tipped at Thetford Forest. Those responsible have been fined £300.


Soil fly-tipped at Thetford Forest. Those responsible have been fined £300.

– Credit: Forestry England

As well, a couple found discarding garden waste in Thetford Forest has also been fined £300 after photographic evidence was passed on to the council.

East director of forest management Alex Brealey said: “Fly-tipping costs Forestry England a significant amount each year meaning we can’t spend money on programmes that deliver for people, nature and the economy.


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“The environmental harm caused by fly-tipping is considerable. We will work tirelessly to find the people responsible for fly-tipping and secure a prosecution.”


Soil fly-tipped at Thetford Forest. Those responsible have been fined £300.


Soil fly-tipped at Thetford Forest. Those responsible have been fined £300.

– Credit: Forestry England

According to Forestry England, “the majority” of the £100,000 spent on fly-tipping across sites in the East of England is at Thetford Forest.



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The race for space | Forest Lake Times


If you’ve been reading these columns for the past few months, I’ve been making the point that we were on the cusp of a renaissance in travel after over a year of tight restrictions. Since last month, the tense of my point has changed. No longer were we on the cusp of a renaissance, now, we are in the midst of a renaissance in travel, and frankly, it’s a bit like all hell as broken loose in the industry. In many ways, that’s a better problem to have than the alternative, but the sudden explosion of demand for travel – which is now fully underway – poses many challenges to travelers looking to break out after the past year. Here are three tips to make your 2021, 2022, and 2023 travels smooth.

Tip 1 – Plan Ahead. Planning ahead has always been a virtue for travelers, typically offering the best choice of accommodations, flights, and touring as well as the best prices. But, in the pre-Covid world, it was typically possible to create a trip at the last minute with a few tradeoffs. Those days are gone.

Today, planning ahead is an absolute necessity, as space of all types is at an extreme premium. To cite a very concrete example – perhaps you saw the news stories recently about last-minute travelers being forced to resort to renting U-Haul trucks in Hawaii because every rental car was booked? Add into the mix the shortage of new rental vehicles due to a global microchip shortage, the fact that many rental car companies liquidated a large portion of their fleet last year, and know that Hawaii’s peak tourist season has yet to come… And this is just one example among hundreds. Don’t be a loser in this race for space – which I think will continue for at least the next 18-24 months – plan way ahead.

Tip 2 – Get to Work on your Bucket List. All of us have ideas of places we’d love to go and experiences we’d love to have while traveling. Now is definitely the time to start planning to check some of these items off your list. As I noted, we’re already in a race for space. A second factor is coming into play now, the desire on the part of popular tourist destinations to significantly limit visitors.

Whether perennial favorites like Venice in Italy, America’s National Parks or the Louvre art museum in Paris or whether more exotic locales like the Galapagos Islands, the Inca Trail in Peru and Antarctica, many destinations are imposing strict limits on the number and types of visitors permitted. The age of mass tourism anytime and everywhere is ending, which will place further pressure on the space available for your bucket list trips.

Tip 3 – Forget the Word “Deal.” As the race for space continues to accelerate this year and next, we won’t be talking much about deals. That’s not to say that low prices won’t be available for some travel components (think Spirit Airlines), but the tradeoffs you’ll have to embrace to get them will become increasingly burdensome. For most of us, paying $59 to fly to Florida at 2 a.m. (plus $35 for a checked bag, $20 for a seat assignment, $4 for a cup of coffee, etc.) isn’t worth it. Travel brands of all sorts – airlines, cruise lines, hotels, tour companies – understand this, and are pricing their services accordingly. Price inflation in travel is very real, and when combined with the race for space, travel in 2021, 2022, and 2023 will certainly be a seller’s market.

Savvy travelers who plan ahead, think strategically about where they want to go, and are ready to pay the price for the best travel options can look forward to unforgettable vacations in 2021, 2022, and 2023. I’d encourage you to start planning those trips now, so that you can be a winner in the race for space – with the added bonus of having a fantastic vacation locked in to look forward to in the months and even years ahead.



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FLORIDA STATE SWITCHES TO ROAD GAME AT WAKE FOREST ON THURSDAY, JAN. 28


GREENSBORO, N.C. (theACC.com) – The Atlantic Coast Conference announced today that the Pitt at Boston College women’s basketball game scheduled for Sunday, Jan. 24, and the Florida State at Boston College game scheduled for Thursday, Jan. 28, have been postponed.

Boston College remains in COVID protocols, resulting in the postponement of the games. The program is adhering to the outlined protocols within the ACC Medical Advisory Group report, which is available on theACC.com (full report).
As a result of the postponements, Pitt will travel to Clemson on Tuesday, Jan. 26, for a 7 p.m. tipoff on ACC Network Extra. Additionally, Wake Forest will host Florida State on Thursday, Jan. 28, at 6 p.m. on ACCNX, moving up the scheduled Feb. 2 game.

The conference also announced tip times and television designations for the games listed below.
The full 2020-21 ACC women’s basketball schedule can be found on theACC.com.

Adjusted Games
Sunday, January 24
Pitt at Boston College | Postponed

Tuesday, January 26
Pitt at Clemson | 7 p.m. | ACCNX

Thursday, January 28
Florida State at Boston College | Postponed
Florida State at Wake Forest | 6 p.m. | ACCNX

Sunday, January 31
Notre Dame at Syracuse | 11 a.m. | ACCN
Clemson at Wake Forest | 2 p.m. | ACCN

Tuesday, February 2
Syracuse at Georgia Tech | 7 p.m. | ACCNX

Sunday, February 14
North Carolina at Pitt | 2 p.m. | ACCNX

Thursday, February 18
Georgia Tech at Florida State | 6 p.m. | ACCN
NC State at Wake Forest | 7 p.m. | RSN

Sunday, February 21
Louisville at Florida State | 4 p.m. | ACCNX

Thursday, February 25
Pitt at NC State | 4 p.m. | RSN





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