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United Sees Domestic, Transatlantic Business Rebound


Corporate bookings at United Airlines are “moving in the right direction,” with both domestic and transatlantic business travel showing signs of recovery in recent weeks, United CEO Scott Kirby said Wednesday during the carrier’s third-quarter earnings call.

“The effects of the delta [Covid-19] variant on our business was substantial, however we expect the worst of this wave is now past,” United chief commercial officer Andrew Nocella said. “In the last two weeks, we’ve seen several leading business indicators return to where we were in July or better.”

Among those indicators, domestic business travel demand has rebounded to the levels seen before the emergence of the delta variant, with business travel demand from United’s largest corporate accounts increasing at a rate similar to its smallest accounts, he said. Demand has been particularly strong from consulting companies but has been rebounding “across the board” in United’s business sectors, according to Nocella. 

Overall, domestic business travel is nearing the 50 percent market compared with pre-pandemic levels, Nocella said. Delta Air Lines reported a similar rate of rebound last week.

“We have not recovered fully on business traffic and have a long way to go,” he said. “Just looking at the trends of only the last few days, our level of being bullish about this has increased a lot. The numbers for the delta variant caused things to go down quickly, and now that we’re past the delta variant, it appears they’re going to go up hopefully just as quickly.”

With the reopening of U.S. borders to vaccinated European travelers a month away, “business traffic across the Atlantic is now tracking consistent with or slightly better than domestic business traffic,” he added.

The return-to-office plans for United’s corporate customers remains a “hodgepodge,” with “people in general more and more returning to their office environment,” Nocella said. United expects business travel to accelerate next year with “a lot of pent-up demand,” he said.

United reported $6.6 billion in passenger revenue for the quarter, down 36.7 percent compared with the third quarter of 2019. Domestic passenger revenue made up $4.8 billion of that total, with transatlantic routes contributing $840 million in revenues, Latin America routes contributing $743 million and transpacific routes contributing $209 million.

Total revenue for the quarter was $7.8 billion, down 31.9 percent compared with 2019. Cargo revenue was up 84 percent across the same period.

As the rebound continues, Kirby said United’s early action with vaccine mandates would benefit the carrier as it would give travelers a reason to “book with confidence” with United. To date, 99.7 percent of the carrier’s employees opted to get vaccinated, president Brett Hart said.

Kirby said that airlines not pursuing mandates, instead letting employees request exemptions and do regular testing for Covid-19, could find themselves facing operational challenges.

“They’re likely to have tens of thousands of employees that need to be tested every week,” Kirby. “People will forget to do their test, do it wrong, don’t get it done or test positive. If you think weather in one state can lead to a meltdown, imagine if you have thousands of employees calling in on one day and saying their test didn’t pass. This is in the rear-view mirror for United.”

United reported net income of $473 million for the third quarter, which included benefits of federal payroll aid. Adjusted for that and other special items, United’s net loss for the quarter was $329 million, compared with an adjusted net loss of $2.4 billion in the third quarter of 2020.

RELATED: United Q2 earnings



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Reminders for SBU Community About International and Domestic Travel |


Spring campus fountain 2Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Paul M. Goldbart and Vice President for Research Richard J. Reeder have shared with the campus community reminders about international and domestic travel. The message reads as follows:

Dear Stony Brook Community,

As the academic year unfolds, here are a few reminders about international and domestic travel.

State and federal health guidelines continue to recommend avoiding international and domestic travel unless travelers are fully vaccinated. If travel is necessary, CDC provides recommendations of precautionary measures.

All Stony Brook faculty, staff, and graduate student employees planning domestic or international travel to conduct research, attend a conference, or participate in other University business must abide by the following instructions for pre-approval. We advise prospective travelers to obtain pre-approval prior to booking any travel arrangements.

  • For State-Funded Travel and Non-Sponsored Research Travel: All domestic and international travel requires pre-approval, which can be requested through the Concur system.
  • For Sponsored Research Travel: No pre-approval is required for domestic travel. International travel requires pre-approval by utilizing the Electronic Foreign Travel Request portal (eFTR).

All prospective travelers for research should review the guidance for travel on sponsored research awards administered through the Research Foundation. All international travelers should review the Export Controls guidance.

Concur System Implementation: Starting in October 2021, the SBU Travel Program began implementing the Concur Travel Expense Reimbursement system. Please visit our website to learn more about Concur and register for training. All travelers should review the current Covid-19 Travel Reimbursement guidelines to ensure compliance in advance of any travel.

Travel Risk Level: International travelers should check the U.S. Department of State to stay updated on the level of risk associated with their destination. Most nations at this time have been identified as high risk, according to CDC and NYS Department of Health.

Sincerely,

Paul M. Goldbart Provost & Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs

Richard J. Reeder, Vice President for Research

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Domestic travel near full recovery; ONT September passenger volumes reached 97% of pre-COVID levels


According to data compiled by the Ontario International Airport Authority (OIAA), the airport welcomed more than 453,000 air travelers last month, more than double the September 2020 total of 195,000. Last month’s totals were just 3% behind the pre-pandemic levels September 2019, when 469,000 passengers flew into or out of ONT.

Domestic and international traffic increased 130% and 242%, respectively, in September. When compared with September 2019, domestic travel was down just 1%, while international passenger volume was 47% lower.

Over the first nine months of 2021, total passenger volume exceeded 3 million, 59% higher than the same period last year and 24% lower than 2019. Domestic travel was 62% higher on a year-to-date basis while international volume was up 3%.

“Ontario International continues to be a bright spot in the aviation industry’s ongoing pandemic recovery,” said Curt Hagman, an OIAA commissioner and chairman of the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors. “Having watched the transfer of ONT from the City of Los Angeles five years ago, I believed then just as I do now that we have the benefit of a broad and loyal customer base along with the ability to provide a hassle-free customer service experience in a vital gateway airport that is safe and secure.”

Passenger

Totals

Sept.

2021

Sept.

2020

Change

YTD

2021

YTD

2020

Change

Domestic

440,947

191,467

130.3%

2,980,026

1,840,964

61.9%

International

12,227

3,570

242.49%

79,186

76,336

3.7%

Total

453,174

195,037

132.35%

3,059,212

1,917,300

59.6%

Passenger

Totals

Sept.

2021

Sept.

2019

Change

YTD

2021

YTD

2019

Change

Domestic

440,947

446,169

-1.17%

2,980,026

3,838,865

-22.4%

International

12,227

23,155

-47.19

79,186

223,889

-64.6%

Total

453,174

469,324

-3.44

3,059,212

4,062,754

-24.7%

Shipments of air freight and mail in September totaled more than 70,000 tons, 9.4% lower than September last year, but 15.4% higher than 2019. For the first nine months of the year, total cargo volume was more than 644,000 tons, a 3.5% decline compared with 2020, but 15.6% higher than 2019.

“In addition to creating an airport which is attractive to our partner airlines and their passengers, we’ve made dramatic improvements on the cargo side with expanded and modern facilities which appeal to shippers,” Hagman said.

Air cargo

(tonnage)

Sept.

2021

Sept.

2020

Change

YTD

2021

YTD

2020

Change

Freight

66,380

75,862

-12.5%

609,952

651,809

-6.4%

Mail

4,269

2,174

96.41%

34,426

15,780

118.2%

Total

70,649

78,035

-9.46%

644,378

667,589

-3.5%

Air cargo

(tonnage)

Sept.

2021

Sept.

2019

Change

YTD

2021

YTD

2019

Change

Freight

66,380

59,918

10.79%

609,952

539,062

13.2%

Mail

4,269

1,271

235.87%

34,426

18,221

88.9%

Total

70,649

61,189

15.46%

644,378

557,283

15.6%

About Ontario International Airport
Ontario International Airport (ONT) is the fastest growing airport in the United States, according to Global Traveler, a leading publication for frequent fliers. Located in the Inland Empire, ONT is approximately 35 miles east of downtown Los Angeles in the center of Southern California. It is a full-service airport which, before the coronavirus pandemic, offered nonstop commercial jet service to 26 major airports in the U.S., Mexico and Taiwan. More information is available at www.flyOntario.com. Follow @flyONT on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.  

About the Ontario International Airport Authority (OIAA)
The OIAA was formed in August 2012 by a Joint Powers Agreement between the City of Ontario and the County of San Bernardino to provide overall direction for the management, operations, development and marketing of ONT for the benefit of the Southern California economy and the residents of the airport’s four-county catchment area. OIAA Commissioners are Ontario Mayor Pro Tem Alan D. Wapner (President), Retired Riverside Mayor Ronald O. Loveridge (Vice President), Ontario City Council Member Jim W. Bowman (Secretary), San Bernardino County Supervisor Curt Hagman (Commissioner) and retired business executive Julia Gouw (Commissioner).

OIAA Media Contact:
Steve Lambert, (909) 841-7527 [email protected]

SOURCE Ontario International Airport

Related Links

www.flyontario.com





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Fauci says vaccine mandate for domestic air travel is not expected ‘immediately’ – The Washington Post



Fauci says vaccine mandate for domestic air travel is not expected ‘immediately’  The Washington Post



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CDC Recommends Unvaccinated Americans Avoid Domestic Travel Ahead of Holiday Season




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Senate bill would put Covid restrictions on domestic air travel: Travel Weekly


A new Senate bill would require all passengers on domestic airline flights to be fully vaccinated, test negatively for Covid-19 within 72 hours of departure or show proof of recent recovery from the virus. 

The bill, filed by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D.-Calif.), follows a similar one filed in the House last month by Rep. Don Beyer (D.-Va.). 

“We know that air travel during the 2020 holiday season contributed to last winter’s devastating Covid-19 surge. We simply cannot allow that to happen again,” Feinstein said in a prepared remark. “Ensuring that air travelers protect themselves and their destination communities from this disease is critical to prevent the next surge, particularly if we confront new, more virulent variants of Covid-19.”

Travel industry lobby groups have opposed similar proposals, arguing that they are difficult on families with children who cannot be vaccinated and are not needed due to the safety of airplane environments as it relates to Covid transmission. 



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COVID-19 Task Force Hasn’t Ruled Out US Domestic Vaccine Passports


Dr. Anthony Fauci today stated that the possibility of the federal government requiring vaccine passports for domestic air travel within the U.S. is “still on the table”, among other policies under consideration.

As the White House’s Chief Medical Advisor, Fauci appeared earlier today on NBC News’ ‘Meet the Press’ to answer some of reporter Chuck Todd’s questions about the Biden administration’s continuing response to COVID-19.

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When asked whether a vaccine mandate for domestic flyers was still under consideration by the COVID-19 task force, Fauci said: “The team has a lot of things on the table, nothing has been taken off the table. That decision has not been made.”

His response echoes a remark made on September 10 by Jeff Zients—the White House’s coronavirus response coordinator—who, when questioned about the Biden administration’s stance on requiring vaccinations for domestic air travel, said: “I think we have a very strong track record that shows we’re pulling available levers to acquire vaccinations and we’re not taking any measures off the table.”

But, everyone seems to be on board as far as mandating vaccinations for inbound foreign travelers. Last Wednesday, a senior White House official let slip that the government is developing a “new system for international travel”, which would replace the U.S.’ current blanket restrictions on travelers from many foreign countries.

Based on Zients’ comments, Reuters reported that the scheme will likely include both vaccination requirements and compulsory pre-travel testing, and involve a comprehensive new contact-tracing system in cooperation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Because the new system would mean lifting current catch-all bans on travelers from certain countries, existing international travel restrictions won’t be relaxed while the Delta variant-driven fourth COVID-19 surge continues.

Separately, Fauci stated last week that he would personally support the implementation of a vaccine passport program for domestic flyers. “I would support that if you want to get on a plane and travel with other people that you should be vaccinated,” Fauci said during a September 12 interview, according to Newsweek.

The U.S. Travel Association immediately railed against Fauci’s stance, saying that the existing precautionary measures in use by airlines and airports, such as mask-wearing, provide sufficient protection from COVID-19, even amid Delta and any other potential variants of concern.

It’s no surprise that travel sector players would collectively refuse to support any policy that threatens to diminish consumer demand after the devastation the pandemic inflicted on the industry last year.





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Officials maintain there should be no mandatory vaccination requirement for domestic travel in the United States


DETROIT – There are many measures in airports and on airplanes meant to keep travelers safe from coronavirus.

David Fishman with Cadillac Travel said he wouldn’t be surprised if airlines make even more safety changes soon. Fishman said requiring vaccines could create lots of confusion unless it’s adopted by the entire airline industry.

“U.S. travel has long maintained that there should be no mandatory vaccination requirement for domestic travel. Such a policy would have an unfair, negative impact on families with young children who are not yet eligible to get the vaccine,” a spokesperson for the U.S. travel industry said.

In Miami, there are tests underway for a new program for dogs to sniff out COVID. Trained dogs are being used to identify airline employees who are positive for COVID.

If it proves successful, other highly trained dogs may be brought into terminals.

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Italy introduces Green Pass for domestic travel and protests follow


Italy has said there will be a zero tolerance policy against demonstrators who block trains to oppose a Green Pass requirement.

Passengers are only be allowed to use certain public transport if they show a Green Pass, which proves recent vaccination, a negative COVID test in the past 48 hours or recovery from the disease in the last six months.

The rule, announced some weeks ago, applies to domestic flights, train travel between regions and sea travel. Some ferries are exempt, such as those serving many tiny islands which have no other connections to the mainland, and those used by commuters between Sicily and the southern tip of the mainland in Calabria.

Local buses, trams and metros are exempt from the rule, which was announced by Premier Mario Draghi’s government when daily caseloads started steadily rising as the delta variant of the virus became prevalent in Italy.

Italy’s Green Pass is already being used for those wanted to dine indoors, go to gyms or attend crowded venues like concerts.

On the eve of the new transport rules, Interior Minister Luciana Lamorgese vowed zero-tolerance against any rail track protests or other violence.

Several recent protests against the Green Pass requirement, including in Rome and Milan, turned violent, with police having to rescue a state TV journalist after a protester started yanking her by her hair, and a newspaper reporter was punched repeatedly in the face. Ministers and doctors have received threats.

Lamorgese voiced “the strictest condemnation of the attacks launched with unacceptable tones on social networks against members of the government, politicians, doctors and journalists over the ‘green pass’ and containment measures against the spread of COVID-19.”

Police are investigating the incidents.

“No illegal acts will be permitted in protest initiatives at train stations” billed by organisers for Wednesday, Lamorgese said.

Militants of an extreme-right group, New Force, as well as some members of extreme-left organizations have participated in the rallies.

So far, some 70% of Italy’s residents 12 years or older have been fully vaccinated. But experts have voiced concern that many people in the 50-69 age group haven’t received vaccines nor signed up for them.



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Vaccine mandate unlikely for domestic travel, United Airlines CEO says


(CNN) — United Airlines CEO Scott Kirby says he does not anticipate a vaccination requirement for travel within the United States, but he said it is possible for some international travel.

When asked whether passengers will need to get vaccinated as a condition to fly, Kirby told CNN’s Victor Blackwell on Wednesday that “it’s a government question, but I suspect that it won’t happen domestically.”

On Wednesday, President Joe Biden met with Kirby and other executives from companies that are mandating that workers get vaccinated.

United announced Friday that all its 67,000 employees in the United States would need to get vaccinated by October 25 or face getting fired.

Kirby says through increased employer mandates, he thinks that the United States could see an 80% to 90% vaccination rate.

Biden “asked us to do everything we could with fellow CEOs or anyone we were in contact with to encourage others to do the same thing,” Kirby said.

3 other US airlines take a different route

The CEOs of Southwest Airlines, American Airlines and Delta Air Lines say they are not requiring unvaccinated employees to get the shot.

In an internal memo obtained by CNN, Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly said the airline will “continue to strongly encourage” that workers get vaccinated, but the airline’s stance has not shifted.

American Airlines CEO Doug Parker said in a New York Times podcast interview that the airline is giving workers who get vaccinated by the end of this month one extra day of vacation in 2022.

But the company is not putting a mandate in place, he said.

In May, Delta became the first major carrier to require that all new hires be vaccinated, but the company has not issued a mandate for all employees.

Top image: A United Airlines Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner seen at gate at Washington Dulles International Airport on March 12, 2021. (Daniel Slim/AFP/Getty Images)



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