business trip

Delta Readies ‘Digital Identity’ Experience for Atlanta


Facial-recognition equipment at the gate conducts a scan to let the passenger through, without the need to show identification or a boarding pass.
Facial-recognition equipment at the gate conducts a scan to let the passenger through, without the need to show identification or a boarding pass.

Many of Delta Air Lines’ domestic passengers soon will have the option to traverse the airport using a “digital identity:” a combination of their SkyMiles member number, passport number and Known Traveler Number.

Delta’s new facial-recognition-powered path in Atlanta, developed in partnership with the U.S. Transportation Security Administration, includes a dedicated bag-drop area away from the general check-in area, on the lower level of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport near the rideshare drop-off area. There, self-serve kiosks confirm passengers’ identity with a facial scan and print out bag tags, which passengers can attach to their bags, then load them onto a conveyer belt.

From there, passengers can pass through the security checkpoint that has a second camera to perform the facial scan. A third piece of equipment at the gate conducts another facial scan to let the passenger through, without the need to show identifications or boarding passes at any point.

To participate, travelers must be members of both Delta’s SkyMiles program and the TSA’s PreCheck program. About a quarter of Delta’s Atlanta-based flyers currently are members of both, Delta managing director of airport experience Greg Forbes said. Those passengers will have the choice to opt in when checking in through the Delta app, an option that will reappear each trip from Atlanta.

Throughout the airport journey, those passengers will have the option to follow whichever path they like, Forbes said. If they are members of Clear, which uses biometric identifiers like fingerprint and iris scans, they still can use that line, for example. Staff is on hand throughout all aspects of the process in case there’s a snag with the technology.

Ultimately, however, TSA sees facial recognition as a much more effective method of security than standard ID checks, Forbes said. “It’s much harder to fool facial recognition than it is to counterfeit a driver’s license,” he said.

Delta has been working on its biometric technology for several years, including its similar program in Detroit that soon will have its own dedicated bag-drop area as well, and is working on expanding to more of its hubs. Delta VP of brand experience design Byron Merritt said facial recognition was a “fundamental capability,” similar to Wi-Fi on an aircraft, that will open up other passenger experience opportunities in the future, such as lounge access.

“Having the ability for a customer to move more seamlessly through the airport is going to unlock a better way to being able to serve you more broadly,” Merritt said.



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A Digital Nomad’s Favorite Tips for Managing Travel Safely with MS


It may take some extra effort but traveling with MS is possible — and rewarding.

As a digital nomad living with multiple sclerosis (MS), I’m perpetually exhausted. Planning, packing, airports, reservations — it’s a lot even for a person without a chronic condition. And then there’s the fear of a flare-up to deal with during vacation.

What if I get an exacerbation while traveling abroad or on a cruise overseas? Without immediate access to my doctor, how do people with MS travel safely?

As a veteran traveler with a debilitating disease, I own these worries. Travel could be a source of stress and exposure to infection that can lead to faulty bodily reactions like fatigue, numbness, foot drop, and mobility and vision problems.

The reality is that a person with MS often cannot depend on a seamless adventure without support. These are the steps I take to ensure I can travel safely to keep my MS in check.

Keep up with guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and practice physical distancing to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

If you plan to travel, consider more remote destinations to enjoy activities like hiking or camping.

Having fewer people around you means you’re less likely to be exposed to the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, which is key for everyone, not just those of us with MS.

If you’re itching for a more fast-paced experience, explore larger cities on days that are less busy to avoid crowds, like on weekday afternoons.

Whether staying at a resort or in an Airbnb, I always consider having an accessible pool a priority.

Besides being a fun activity, exercising in pools is great for strength building, and also keeps you cool to avoid that dreaded MS temperature sensitivity.

But beware of Jacuzzis and hot tubs. They can feel good for a bit, but long-term dips often result in hours of post-Jacuzzi fatigue.

Pro tip: Get your hair wet. Cool water on your scalp feels so refreshing. I can feel my internal temps drop when I dive into the water.

Infections can make you more prone to having an MS relapse. That means the risk of a stomach illness is real.

You don’t want to grapple with stomach issues from chicken sizzling on the outdoor grill for hours festering in the sun.

If you absolutely need to try the local street cuisine, make sure there’s a busy line in front of the stand so you know the food is fresh.

Request a fridge in your room for snacks and for your temperature-controlled medications. If your meds are the kind that must be refrigerated, this really comes in handy.

Try regional goodies and local snacks for quick, clean meals to keep in your minifridge.

Even if you only have a sink in your room, slicing open a mango and downing it over the sink is bound to be one of your most precious memories.

Having a routine is a critical part of my travel health management.

In the midst of an exciting vacation, it’s easy to break plans to exercise or to forget to take your vitamins.

To plan ahead, I create a morning and evening checklist to set the beginning of my day as productive and the end of my day as restful. Having a checklist of desired goals and daily practices — like a 10-minute meditation, stretching, or starting the day with a glass of water — helps me relieve anxiety from stressful travel.

When you’ve got wonders to explore, it’s easy to get worn out.

Schedule in sleep by setting a Cinderella-style curfew if you have an early morning tour. Don’t feel guilty about snoozing if you stayed up late adventuring.

Before you set off traveling, plan how you’ll handle recovery at the end of a tiring day. After a long day, it’s nice to know how to get back to homeostasis, like a night soak, a mindful stretch, or a cooling compress.

During an ill-timed, mid-vacation relapse, it’s good to have a contingency plan on how best to handle nursing it.

While planning your daily excursions, note what nearby hospitals are readily available.

Once, I had a relapse in Thailand and I was so uncomfortable until my heavy numbness (a combination of MS corset and foot drop) went away by itself toward the end of the trip. If your doc approves, having emergency medication on hand may help through a rough relapse.

In addition, pack any supplements and medications you normally take. I like to bring an extra week’s worth with me in a pill case.

Your preferred over-the-counter medicines will support you through aches from all the walking on tours and excursions.

Also, consider if you might run into motion sickness or altitude sickness, and talk with your doctor about writing a prescription for appropriate medications as you prep for travel. Don’t skip this. It’s the worst to be the only one puking on the cruise or horribly sick in the mountains.

If you take disease-modifying therapy in shot or pill form, consider bringing extra along on your trip in case your travel plans change.

Most insurance providers allow a 3-month supply of medication for travel per year, but you’ll likely be on the phone a long time coordinating this bulk supply of meds. Get your doctor on board and email everyone.

Pro tip: Reach out to your insurance provider’s Facebook page for support. My insurance provider’s support through Facebook Messenger helped expedite the process of getting an extra supply of vacation medication quickly.

If you’re going abroad, I really recommend looking into traveler’s insurance.

Some providers do not cover preexisting conditions, so be careful while shopping around. In addition, some plans require that you purchase insurance within 15 days of traveling in order to lock in preexisting coverage.

Remember that the primary purpose of traveler’s insurance is not for preexisting conditions, but instead for those moments when you twist an ankle, break an arm, or get food poisoning. Accidents like this are of greater risk for those who are immunocompromised.

Still, it’s good to be covered. Expect to pay $50 to $70 per month to cover yourself with a decent plan.

If a place is on your bucket list, don’t assume it’s out of reach for you because you have MS. Traveling safely with MS may take some additional effort and planning, but I find it’s always worth it in the end.


As a digital nomad with multiple sclerosis, Monica Lynne travels the world managing her condition and working remotely as a copywriter and language interpreter. She focuses on social media management and influencer marketing with Miami-based boutique PR agency, JLPR. With degrees in theater, dance, and communication studies from Nova Southeastern University, she has a presence in South Florida’s arts & culture community as an actor and content creator.



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GoodTrust partners with The Travel Plan by Inman to launch digital end-of-life services


The partnership will offer Travel Plan participants, at no cost, the GoodTrust Premium Plan for 3 months with a free will-maker-tool and VIP service to take care of accounts like Facebook and LinkedIn after someone passes away.

GoodTrust also makes it possible for anyone to secure their online life with a digital vault. Users can also create their will for free in less than 15 minutes and share stories and memories like animated photos or Future Messages

“We are excited to be partnering with GoodTrust to help families take care of this important need in today’s digital world by ensuring their digital legacy,” said Dave McComb, CEO, Inman Worldwide Shipping. “Together with GoodTrust we can offer an important service that also provides funeral professionals with a new revenue opportunity.”

About the Travel Plan by Inman
The Travel Plan by Inman is a travel protection product of Inman Shipping Worldwide which is sold preneed. We are the only Plan that is supported by the vetted network of Inman Service Providers. Inman has served the funeral service profession since 1978 and is the oldest and largest repatriation firm in the country. The Travel Plan brings a loved one home for ceremony if the die 75 miles or more from their legal address. Our owner, Dave McComb is a 4th generation funeral director and understands the needs of the funeral professional.

About GoodTrust
GoodTrust is the leading digital legacy and end-of-life planning platform. It allows anyone to manage memories and digital assets for the “afterlife,” designate who should have access, and create innovative ways to connect the stories of the past with the future. GoodTrust also helps families who have lost someone take care of the deceased person’s digital assets through memorialization, asset management or shutting down accounts. The GoodTrust will-creation tool is free and only takes 15 minutes.

You can find GoodTrust at www.MyGoodTrust.com

Contact: [email protected]

Inman Worldwide Shipping contact information:

[email protected]

Please find GoodTrust graphics and images here:
https://drive.google.com/drive/u/1/folders/1XGj-ewLwJq458AWAWsv_fnUI7WJF7xaL

SOURCE GoodTrust

Related Links

https://mygoodtrust.com



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Why the Amex Platinum ‘digital entertainment credit’ is the most disappointing new perk






Why the Amex Platinum ‘digital entertainment credit’ is the most disappointing new perk – The Points Guy




















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Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.



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Traveling the world as gay digital nomads


Francesca Street, CNN

Ignacio Nieto Carvajal and Miguel Piñas Rodríguez met by chance in a gay bar in Madrid, not long after Nieto Carvajal moved to the Spanish capital for work.

Nieto Carvajal almost didn’t go out that night, but he says he’s so glad he did.

“With Miguel, it was love at first sight, I knew it from the first time I saw him,” Nieto Carvajal tells CNN Travel today.

“At the beginning it was like this crazy thing with butterflies and everything.”

Within a few months, Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez were living together. Less than five years later, they were married.

A year after their wedding, the couple decided to up sticks and travel the world together, working remotely along the way.

Piñas Rodríguez quit his corporate 9-5 job and started working for himself in the web design/SEO arena. Nieto Carvajal was in the second year of running his own developer company.

The two sold all their furniture and most of their belongings in Spain and became fully-fledged digital nomads. Now in their 40s, they say they’ve never looked back.

Traveling the world

The couple’s first stop was Riga, the capital of Latvia.

“We had been there before and we loved the city; it was affordable, small and comfortable,” says Nieto Carvajal. On previous visits, they’d also made connections at a co-working space called TechHub, which made settling in easier.

Before long, the couple headed on to Berlin, and soon they were hooked on the thrill of exploring a new place, and what Nieto Carvajal calls the “freedom” of not being tied down.

“You’re exploring new cultures and new people, and it’s so exciting,” he says.

The couple have since spent time in destinations including Vietnam, Bali, Estonia and Malaysia.

Embracing new cultures

“Let’s go there and see what happens,” is how Nieto Carvajal describes the couple’s travel process.

Whenever they arrive somewhere new, the two usually find an Airbnb “at least for a few days or weeks,” explains Piñas Rodríguez.

From there, they’ll generally find somewhere a bit more permanent to make home for a while.

They enjoy getting to know other travelers, but especially like meeting locals and getting their tips. The couple say the only downside to their lifestyle is saying farewell to people and places along the way.

“Every time we travel from one country to the other, I’m very sad at the beginning, because I miss the previous country, and I miss the people,” says Piñas Rodríguez.

But before long they’ll be embracing a new culture and making new friends — and for Piñas Rodríguez, those connections often come through food.

“I’m a foodie person. You learn how to cook new recipes, amazing ones,” he says, citing Thailand and Malaysia as two of his favorite food cultures he’s embraced over the years.

Traveling while gay

While Piñas Rodríguez and Nieto Carvajal love traveling, they say there are challenges that come hand-in-hand with digital nomad living — from dealing with dodgy WiFi to arriving at vacation rentals that don’t resemble the photos online.

And on top of those more minor ups and downs, the couple must also navigate traveling safely as gay men.

“Some countries are more welcoming than others to that,” says Nieto Carvajal, who explains that the couple were particularly concerned before heading to countries with little to no legal protection for LGBTQ people, such as Malaysia.

But Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez say locals they met in Malaysia were very welcoming, and overall their experience of being gay digital nomads has been overwhelmingly positive.

When visiting countries known for being less accepting, Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez don’t usually introduce themselves as a couple.

Instead, they say they let people they meet come to that understanding independently.

“People are more accepting than you would think,” says Nieto Carvajal. “They get to know you, and they get to this conclusion that these guys are together after a certain time.”

“Everybody will know,” adds Piñas Rodríguez .

“Eventually they realize that these two guys working together, traveling together, together all the time — they’re a couple,” says Nieto Carvajal.

The couple are also cautious about public displays of affection in certain countries. But although they adapt their behavior in certain situations, the couple say they’re very conscious of the importance of remaining true to themselves on their travels.

Nieto Carvajal’s advice to other LGBTQ travelers is to be aware of your surroundings and knowledgeable about the culture and context, but “don’t try to hide yourselves either.”

Piñas Rodríguez echoes this: “Be natural, and don’t hide.”

Digital nomads in a pandemic

At the beginning of 2020, Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez were in Croatia. Within a couple of weeks, they’d moved on to Serbia.

They were hoping to travel to Canada that spring, and then head through the US and on to South America.

Then Covid-19 hit Europe.

“When we were in Serbia, everything kind of started to explode,” recalls Nieto Carvajal.

The couple moved to Bulgaria in late February, around the time Italy had become the European epicenter for coronavirus. They recall officials at Bulgarian customs assuming they were Italian, and initially refusing to let them in, before learning they were Spanish and ushering them through.

A week after they arrived in Bulgaria, many European countries closed their borders and went into lockdown. Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez ended up in Bulgaria for almost a year.

“We decided to wait until at least we were vaccinated and everything was more stable,” says Nieto Carvajal.

He adds that the pandemic underlined a consequence of the digital nomad lifestyle they’d been hitherto unaware of: As they weren’t permanent residents in Bulgaria, they couldn’t get vaccinated right away.

But by spring 2021, they had their shots and headed to Turkey, then Spain for a long-awaited reunion with their family and on to Estonia for the next leg of their adventure.

Working remotely

Pre-pandemic, “digital nomad” was already becoming a bit of a buzzword.

And now — what with many people spending much of the past 18 months working remotely — more workers might be wondering if they can log in remotely in the future.

Piñas Rodríguez and Nieto Carvajal’s top tip for would-be digital nomads is to know how you’re going to make money before you hit the road.

The couple also caution against assuming social media or blogging will be a source of funds. In fact, somewhat unusually for digital nomads, Piñas Rodríguez and Nieto Carvajal largely eschew social media — Piñas Rodríguez sticks to changing his Facebook status when he moves countries and uploading the occasional photo to Instagram.

Nieto Carvajal doesn’t use social media apps at all, but does keep up a work blog.

Today, Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez both work for the same organization, Your Company in Estonia. Nieto Carvajal is the CEO and Piñas Rodríguez is the CMO.

“We have had different companies in the past, but this common project really took off the ground so we focused on it and closed our previous companies,” says Nieto Carvajal.

Nieto Carvajal says the company helps entrepreneurs run online companies based out of Estonia, taking care of tax, accounting and compliance.

While the couple advocate getting your work affairs in order before you start traveling full-time, they also admit that sometimes you’ve got to just take a plunge into the unknown.

Don’t think you’re too old, or that it’s too late, they urge.

“The worst enemy of oneself is probably your own fears,” says Nieto Carvajal. “Don’t be so scared of trying.”

Future plans

Some digital nomads may view their travels as more of a short-term hiatus, rather than a long-term life choice, but Piñas Rodríguez and Nieto Carvajal say they’ve got no plans to stop traveling.

They’re hoping to make it to Canada and Latin America one day, and they’ve also got Georgia and South Africa on their long-term to-visit list.

They sometimes meet former digital nomads who fell in love with a particular destination and chose to make their stay there permanent.

Piñas Rodríguez reckons he could have stayed in Bali, while Nieto Carvajal loves Estonia.

But for now the couple don’t have any intentions to put down roots.

“Maybe when we are 60 or something,” says Nieto Carvajal.

“It is exciting to be able to share this together and we are grateful of every minute we spend together and every new place we discover hand in hand.”

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.



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Traveling the world as gay digital nomads


(CNN) — Ignacio Nieto Carvajal and Miguel Piñas Rodríguez met by chance in a gay bar in Madrid, not long after Nieto Carvajal moved to the Spanish capital for work.

Nieto Carvajal almost didn’t go out that night, but he says he’s so glad he did.

“With Miguel, it was love at first sight, I knew it from the first time I saw him,” Nieto Carvajal tells CNN Travel today.

“At the beginning it was like this crazy thing with butterflies and everything.”

Within a few months, Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez were living together. Less than five years later, they were married.

A year after their wedding, the couple decided to up sticks and travel the world together, working remotely along the way.

Piñas Rodríguez quit his corporate 9-5 job and started working for himself in the web design/SEO arena. Nieto Carvajal was in the second year of running his own developer company.

The two sold all their furniture and most of their belongings in Spain and became fully-fledged digital nomads. Now in their 40s, they say they’ve never looked back.

Traveling the world

Miguel Piñas Rodríguez at the Pride Parade in Berlin in July 2016. Berlin was one of the couple's early trips.

Miguel Piñas Rodríguez at the Pride Parade in Berlin in July 2016. Berlin was one of the couple’s early trips.

Courtesy Ignacio Nieto Carvajal and Miguel Piñas Rodríguez

The couple’s first stop was Riga, the capital of Latvia.

“We had been there before and we loved the city; it was affordable, small and comfortable,” says Nieto Carvajal. On previous visits, they’d also made connections at a co-working space called TechHub, which made settling in easier.

Before long, the couple headed on to Berlin, and soon they were hooked on the thrill of exploring a new place, and what Nieto Carvajal calls the “freedom” of not being tied down.

“You’re exploring new cultures and new people, and it’s so exciting,” he says.

The couple have since spent time in destinations including Vietnam, Bali, Estonia and Malaysia.

Embracing new cultures

“Let’s go there and see what happens,” is how Nieto Carvajal describes the couple’s travel process.

Whenever they arrive somewhere new, the two usually find an Airbnb “at least for a few days or weeks,” explains Piñas Rodríguez.

From there, they’ll generally find somewhere a bit more permanent to make home for a while.

They enjoy getting to know other travelers, but especially like meeting locals and getting their tips. The couple say the only downside to their lifestyle is saying farewell to people and places along the way.

“Every time we travel from one country to the other, I’m very sad at the beginning, because I miss the previous country, and I miss the people,” says Piñas Rodríguez.

But before long they’ll be embracing a new culture and making new friends — and for Piñas Rodríguez, those connections often come through food.

“I’m a foodie person. You learn how to cook new recipes, amazing ones,” he says, citing Thailand and Malaysia as two of his favorite food cultures he’s embraced over the years.

Traveling while gay

Nieto Carvajal at an exhibition supporting the LGBTQ community on Lover's Bridge in Sofia, Bulgaria in August 2020.

Nieto Carvajal at an exhibition supporting the LGBTQ community on Lover’s Bridge in Sofia, Bulgaria in August 2020.

Courtesy Ignacio Nieto Carvajal and Miguel Piñas Rodríguez

While Piñas Rodríguez and Nieto Carvajal love traveling, they say there are challenges that come hand-in-hand with digital nomad living — from dealing with dodgy WiFi to arriving at vacation rentals that don’t resemble the photos online.

And on top of those more minor ups and downs, the couple must also navigate traveling safely as gay men.

“Some countries are more welcoming than others to that,” says Nieto Carvajal, who explains that the couple were particularly concerned before heading to countries with little to no legal protection for LGBTQ people, such as Malaysia.

But Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez say locals they met in Malaysia were very welcoming, and overall their experience of being gay digital nomads has been overwhelmingly positive.

When visiting countries known for being less accepting, Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez don’t usually introduce themselves as a couple.

Instead, they say they let people they meet come to that understanding independently.

“People are more accepting than you would think,” says Nieto Carvajal. “They get to know you, and they get to this conclusion that these guys are together after a certain time.”

“Everybody will know,” adds Piñas Rodríguez .

“Eventually they realize that these two guys working together, traveling together, together all the time — they’re a couple,” says Nieto Carvajal.

The couple are also cautious about public displays of affection in certain countries. But although they adapt their behavior in certain situations, the couple say they’re very conscious of the importance of remaining true to themselves on their travels.

Nieto Carvajal’s advice to other LGBTQ travelers is to be aware of your surroundings and knowledgeable about the culture and context, but “don’t try to hide yourselves either.”

Piñas Rodríguez echoes this: “Be natural, and don’t hide.”

Digital nomads in a pandemic

Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez in Lubljana, Slovenia in January 2020.

Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez in Lubljana, Slovenia in January 2020.

Courtesy Ignacio Nieto Carvajal and Miguel Piñas Rodríguez

At the beginning of 2020, Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez were in Croatia. Within a couple of weeks, they’d moved on to Serbia.

They were hoping to travel to Canada that spring, and then head through the US and on to South America.

Then Covid-19 hit Europe.

“When we were in Serbia, everything kind of started to explode,” recalls Nieto Carvajal.

The couple moved to Bulgaria in late February, around the time Italy had become the European epicenter for coronavirus. They recall officials at Bulgarian customs assuming they were Italian, and initially refusing to let them in, before learning they were Spanish and ushering them through.

A week after they arrived in Bulgaria, many European countries closed their borders and went into lockdown. Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez ended up in Bulgaria for almost a year.

“We decided to wait until at least we were vaccinated and everything was more stable,” says Nieto Carvajal.

He adds that the pandemic underlined a consequence of the digital nomad lifestyle they’d been hitherto unaware of: As they weren’t permanent residents in Bulgaria, they couldn’t get vaccinated right away.

But by spring 2021, they had their shots and headed to Turkey, then Spain for a long-awaited reunion with their family and on to Estonia for the next leg of their adventure.

Working remotely

Pre-pandemic, “digital nomad” was already becoming a bit of a buzzword.

And now — what with many people spending much of the past 18 months working remotely — more workers might be wondering if they can log in remotely in the future.

Piñas Rodríguez and Nieto Carvajal’s top tip for would-be digital nomads is to know how you’re going to make money before you hit the road.

The couple also caution against assuming social media or blogging will be a source of funds. In fact, somewhat unusually for digital nomads, Piñas Rodríguez and Nieto Carvajal largely eschew social media — Piñas Rodríguez sticks to changing his Facebook status when he moves countries and uploading the occasional photo to Instagram.

Nieto Carvajal doesn’t use social media apps at all, but does keep up a work blog.

Today, Nieto Carvajal and Piñas Rodríguez both work for the same organization, Your Company in Estonia. Nieto Carvajal is the CEO and Piñas Rodríguez is the CMO.

“We have had different companies in the past, but this common project really took off the ground so we focused on it and closed our previous companies,” says Nieto Carvajal.

Nieto Carvajal says the company helps entrepreneurs run online companies based out of Estonia, taking care of tax, accounting and compliance.

While the couple advocate getting your work affairs in order before you start traveling full-time, they also admit that sometimes you’ve got to just take a plunge into the unknown.

Don’t think you’re too old, or that it’s too late, they urge.

“The worst enemy of oneself is probably your own fears,” says Nieto Carvajal. “Don’t be so scared of trying.”

Future plans

Some digital nomads may view their travels as more of a short-term hiatus, rather than a long-term life choice, but Piñas Rodríguez and Nieto Carvajal say they’ve got no plans to stop traveling.

They’re hoping to make it to Canada and Latin America one day, and they’ve also got Georgia and South Africa on their long-term to-visit list.

They sometimes meet former digital nomads who fell in love with a particular destination and chose to make their stay there permanent.

Piñas Rodríguez reckons he could have stayed in Bali, while Nieto Carvajal loves Estonia.

But for now the couple don’t have any intentions to put down roots.

“Maybe when we are 60 or something,” says Nieto Carvajal.

“It is exciting to be able to share this together and we are grateful of every minute we spend together and every new place we discover hand in hand.”



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The Future of Travel & Tourism is Fueled by Digital Experiences, According to Appnovation … | Your Money


NEW YORK, Sept. 27, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — According to Appnovation ’s latest consumer research, Digital Innovation for the Experience Economy: Travel & Tourism, the majority of travelers are ready to get back to local travel destinations, with 21% of travelers anticipating that they’ll be comfortable with international travel within six to twelve months and 28% in a year or more. Travel brands that integrate digital into customer-first experiences will thrive as the industry rebuilds and travelers regain confidence. 

Appnovation’s research measured American and Canadian consumers’ sentiment around travel readiness amidst the pandemic, as well as their expectations of Travel & Tourism brands in relation to their digital experiences when planning and booking travel.

Traveler Sentiment

Prior to the pandemic, day trips were the most popular form of travel. Day trips were the most popular form of travel for American tourists (64%), similar to their Canadian counterparts (71%). Americans were more likely to travel within their country, with 58% taking out-of-state trips, compared to only 44% of Canadians.Americans are keen to get back to traveling, but at their own pace. Just under half of Americans say they’re ready to travel out of state (49%) or internationally (24%), compared to only 33% of Canadians being ready to travel out of province now and 14% ready to travel internationally now. Traveler confidence gets higher as travelers look to the future. Cautious approach to the safe restart of travel. A third (33%) indicated that they would only feel comfortable to travel again once COVID-19 is gone or nearly gone. A quarter of people reported they would feel comfortable to travel once they and most people at their destination were fully vaccinated.

The Digital Customer Experience

Travel brands must optimize the digital experience. Only 16% of travelers rate the current digital experience offered by destination organizations as ‘Excellent’, rating the digital experience of booking platforms slightly higher, at 19%. However, this indicates that there’s room for improvement.Travelers expect an exceptional digital experience customized to their needs. American travelers ranked easy navigation and up-to-date information as the most important factors (18% and 19%). A user-friendly design (16%) was ranked the second most important factor for a memorable online experience, meaning the user is able to easily and intuitively accomplish what they want.Resources for trip inspiration vary amongst regions. Travelers are visiting destination websites for information around accommodations (71%), places to visit (69%), things to do (62%) and dining recommendations (59%). When planning travel, Americans are more likely to use social media (28%) as a resource for information than Canadians (17%). 

“Now is the time to reimagine the digital experience for the traveler,” said Anton Morrison, VP, Experience Design at Appnovation. “Whether they’re planning, booking or experiencing a vacation, travelers are more cautious. That means there’s likely more research and more digital interactions happening before they’re ready to make a decision. It’s never been more important to invest in a digital experience that serves the relevant information they need alongside the inspiration they want.”

Travel Brands Should Focus on Values-Driven Experiences to Exceed Consumer Expectations

Customers ultimately value a seamless omnichannel experience that combines innovative, adaptive and convenient digital experiences with personalized and seamless in-person ones.

Three Actions Travel Brands Must Consider

Focus on the customer. Different generations value different things when it comes to the online experience. It’s important to understand what the customer wants and how they’re behaving at every step of the journey in order to deliver a best-in-class experience.Provide personalized, data-driven experiences. By collecting  and analyzing data, travel brands can create data-driven experiences that are personalized to the individual customer. When this happens consistently, customer loyalty and  trust follow.Implement scalable, flexible technology to achieve this flexible and agile CX. Technology that allows for personalization, scalability and the addition of new channels as customers’ expectations evolve is essential

The full report can be read here.

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Laura Jeffery Appnovation laura.jeffery@appnovation.com

Copyright 2021 GlobeNewswire, Inc.



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Etihad Airways signs with Amadeus for digital revamp | News


Etihad Airways is set to embark on a major digital transformation following the signing of a landmark multi-year deal with Amadeus.

As part of the deal, Etihad will implement the full Amadeus Altéa PSS suite, including web booking, revenue management and merchandising, data management and passenger servicing solutions.

These technology products will be customised for Etihad over the coming years and will improve the experience of guests, staff, travel agents, Etihad Guest members and corporate customers.

Guests will see new web and mobile channels powered by Amadeus Digital Experience suite, offering the simplest user experience possible to purchase flight tickets and manage bookings.

Advanced retailing capabilities will be developed collaboratively using machine learning to provide guests with bespoke offerings and personalise their travel experience.

To modernise retailing capabilities across sales channels, Etihad has also signed for Amadeus Altéa NDC (New Distribution Capability) and will work with Amadeus to distribute personalised travel offers to guests.

Etihad will make its full range of NDC offers available to Amadeus travel sellers, allowing agents to see the features of Etihad’s award-winning product more transparently and the ancillaries that can be bought.

Mohammad Al Bulooki, chief operating officer, Etihad, said: “The aviation industry is going through a digital revolution, and Etihad Airways is committed to staying at the forefront of that change.

“With Amadeus as a partner, Etihad’s guests will be able to enjoy the best user experience possible as they book and manage their flights, with the ability to customise their travel to an unprecedented level.

“Etihad is also excited to push NDC forward as a means to offer a much richer, relevant and dynamic shopping experience to our trade partners, and Amadeus is the perfect partner to support that strategy.”





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Roundup: Rfider links COVID-19 test with digital health pass for travel, Vietnam’s tourism app features health declaration form and more briefs


New Zealand-based Rfider links COVID-19 test with digital health pass for travel

New Zealand software firm Rfider has enabled a COVID-19 test in Singapore to connect with a digital health pass for international travel.

In a statement, the company said it has been chosen by Invitrocue, a Singapore-based bioanalytic solutions provider, to empower its saliva-based antigen and PCR-based COVID-19 tests with a technology that allows tracking, tracing and verification. 

Through Rfider’s platform, the Invitrocue tests provide users with a unique ID that helps prevent counterfeiting and enables test results authentication. 

It is also able to securely send the test reports to their mobile devices to be used as a travel pass. 

Rfider says its technology has established compatibility with the Verity platform for such a purpose. Created by self-sovereign identity applications developer Evernym, the said platform is behind the digital health pass of the International Air Transport Association (IATA), which is now being trialled at over 40 airlines globally, including the Australian flag carrier Qantas

“We are pleased to be working with Rfider to make this possible. With this partnership, individuals will be able to store their health data securely on their mobile device and privately share it with trusted providers and authorities with the tap of a button,” Evernym VP of Product James Monaghan said.

The Rfider technology, according to chief executive John Pennington, helps cut down the time to deliver test reports to workers at hospitality and tourism venues, which in turn, ushers in the recovery of in-person events around the world. 

Dr Stephen Fang, executive director of Invitrocue, said its partnership with Rfider enabled them to “scale the deployment” of their testing platform and deliver results to users and even to decision makers in “real-time”. “It is a step-change in not only the way testing is conducted but how we can get better data faster,” he added.


Health declaration form integrated in Vietnam’s tourism app 

Vietnam’s mobile tourism app called “Du lick Viet Nam an toan” now features a health declaration form.

According to a news report, the inclusion of the health declaration form, which connects to a system managed by the National Steering Committee on COVID-19 Prevention and Control, is part of health authorities’ efforts to enhance their pandemic response. Adding the new feature also removes the need for users to switch to another platform just to fill out the form.

Launched last year in October by the Vietnam National Administration of Tourism, the mobile app contains a digital map that shows information on restaurants, hotels, apartments, entertainment places, transport providers, hospitals and pharmacies.

The tourism app also provides the most updated information about the COVID-19 situation in any destination, including details about infection cases and the number of recovered patients.

Developers are working to add other features, such as COVID-19 safety verification, COVID-19 vaccine certification, health records, travel insurance and e-tickets.

The news report noted that due to the prevailing travel restrictions and border closures, there were only about 105,000 international tourist arrivals recorded in the country in the first eight months of 2021, a 97% decline compared to the same period in 2020. 


Indian medical news portal goes mobile

Medical Dialogues, an online medical news portal in India, has launched its mobile app for Android and iOS devices. 

The Google news-registered portal provides medical news, guidelines, interesting cases and news about the healthcare industry. It claims to have over two million visits each month. The news site has a HONcode certification for bringing authentic health information on the internet.

Its development, according to the company, comes following demand from over 600,000 medical fraternities who are registered users of the portal.

Aiming to empower and update doctors with medical knowledge, the app contains new features such as video library, webinars for doctors and interactive modules like quizzes, surveys and polls.

“As the pioneer of risk management in the country, doctors have to be associated with the medical updates under the COVID-19 guidelines as the virus is taking a new shape every week. Doctors need to be updated with the latest information about COVID-19. With maintaining the dictum of offering the best service, Medical Dialogues has launched the app for healthcare and medical professionals,” Dr Prem Aggarwal, co-founder of Medical Dialogues, said.


Vietnamese-American charity group extends free teleconsultations to COVID-19 patients in Vietnam

Vietnamese-American charity organisation Good Samaritan Medical Dental Ministry has collaborated with the provinces of Dong Nai and Tien Giang in Vietnam to deliver free remote doctor consultations with COVID-19 patients at home.

According to a news report, a telemedicine system will be used to connect the patients with doctors in the US and Vietnam for virtual consultations. 

The report noted that Dong Nai and Tien Giang are among southern provinces in the country that reported high incidences of COVID-19 infections. In Dong Nai, for instance, around 23,000 citizens have contracted the disease with over 200 people already dead.

The charity group said they could accommodate between 200 and 300 COVID-19 patients for consultations “every four hours”. They also offered help to deliver blood oxygen monitoring devices and oxygen concentrators from the government to patients needing them.



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Digital Rupee Trial, No Tech to Implement Crypto Travel Rule + More News


Digital Rupee Trial, No Tech to Implement Crypto Travel Rule + More News 101
Source: AdobeStock / mrinal

Get your daily, bite-sized digest of cryptoasset and blockchain-related news – investigating the stories flying under the radar of today’s crypto news.

CBDC news

  • The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) could commence preliminary central bank digital currency (CBDC) trials before the end of the year, the bank’s governor Shaktikanta Das told CNBC. He has added that the central bank was “being extremely careful” in its handling of a potential digital rupee even as its counterparts around the world are exploring their own sovereign digital currencies.

Regulation news

  • The Australian Department of Home Affairs said it agrees with submissions from industry that the government currently does not have the technological capability for implementing a travel rule for cryptocurrencies, according to ZDNet. A travel rule would require financial institutions to pass certain information onto another financial institution to provide more transparency regarding cryptocurrency movement, but Home Affairs assistant secretary Daniel Mossop stated that, “We are not at the point where, globally, there is such a technological solution.”
  • Officials from the Australian Federal Police and Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission will be able to target suspected criminals online thanks to the ‘Identify and Disrupt Bill’ that passed through the Australian Senate, the InnovationAus reported. The new warrants include authorizing police to hack the personal computers and networks of suspected criminals, seize control of their online accounts and identities, and disrupt their data.

Adoption news

  • Meme cryptocurrency DogeCola has announced it has launched its non-alcoholic beverage. In addition, the DogeCola community will make a contribution through regular donations, to fight against plastic pollution, described as “a serious issue of global concern which requires an urgent and international response involving all relevant actors at different levels.”

DeFi news

  • Chain-agnostic protocol AllianceBlock has today unveiled a new technical roadmap. Per the press release, the roadmap outlines the upcoming milestones that will bring AllianceBlock’s vision of bridging the gap between decentralized finance (DeFi) and traditional finance (TradFi) closer by remedying issues that exist in both spheres and linking the two worlds of finance together.
  • Blockchain lending company Algofi has announced the launch of a decentralized lending market on the Algorand (ALGO) blockchain, as the company aims to become the first crypto-native bank to bridge the gap between traditional and decentralized finance, they said. The initial lending protocol will launch for users everywhere in Q4 of 2021, with additional fiat on- and off-ramp solutions, and more, forthcoming.

Exchanges news

  • Digital asset exchange Gate.io has launched a cloud mining offering, “bringing the benefits of traditional cryptocurrency mining without the massive costs involved with setting up a mining operation,” they said. Packages start at USD 47 for a Starter mining contract, and users can opt to choose one of several different cloud mining offerings based on their budget, they added.

NFT news

  • Gamified NFT project that financially supports mental health charities Piñazza has announced it has launched the first series of its two-part non-fungible token (NFT) drop called the Piñazza Piñas. Everyone who mints a Piña will receive a free future airdrop of a Piñazza Pizza NFT, so owners get two opportunities to receive a drop that they can later trade with the community, the team said.

Career news

  • Crypto exchange Coinbase has appointed Kate Rouch, formerly Facebook‘s Global Head of Brand and Product Marketing, as their Chief Marketing Officer. They have added that, “Kate’s experience at a company with the scale and impact of Facebook will be invaluable as we continue building our brand, growing our teams and working to bring millions more people into the cryptoeconomy.”
  • DRIFE, decentralised ride-hailing platform that allows passengers to pay in crypto, has announced Siddharth Bhatia as its new Chief Scientist. Bhatia previously worked with Google Research, Amazon, and Microsoft Research, and will now work to help enhance the technology powering the DRIFE platform, said the press release.



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