British Airways begins rebuilding cabin crew numbers | News


British Airways has announced that it will be opening its doors to new cabin crew recruits to work for the airline from spring next year to help fly its summer schedule.

The airline has already contacted people in the existing talent pools, which holds the details of people who left the business last year but have expressed an interest to return to the airline, when jobs are available.

In addition to the experienced crew members looking to return, the airline is also appealing to a broad range of people to create the most diverse crew workforce in its 100-year history.

Sean Doyle, British Airways chief executive, said: “After 18 long months of closed or restricted borders across the world, we are finally seeing a demand for travel return as countries start to open up and ease their restrictions.

“This means that we can finally get back to doing what we do best – flying our customers around the world.

“As we look ahead to next summer, we are excited to start welcoming brilliant new people and former colleagues back to the British Airways family.”

He added: “Everyone is welcome at British Airways; we have an opportunity to give people of all ages and backgrounds the chance to see the world and help shape the future of our airline.

“We know that there are people looking for the first step in their career or a complete career change.

“We will value the skills and experience they will bring to the role to help serve our customers.”

To incentivise new starters, the airline is also waiving its policy around the need to do six months at the airline before accessing staff travel.

Unlike other UK airlines, British Airways offers its cabin crew the chance to fly long and short-haul routes across its network which means that the team gets the chance to experience global destinations from Barbados to Berlin, giving individuals access to travel to more cities than any other airline.

Applications are now open, and assessments will take place throughout November.

Crew will be able to earn up to £28,000 a year with flying/duty pay and a tax-fee subsistence allowance, as well as generous company benefits.

More Information

People who would like to apply to the airline can do so through the British Airways careers website.





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UArizona Research Project to Monitor Health of SpaceX Inspiration4 Crew Members


College of Medicine – Phoenix

Today

zenhausern and colleagues
From left to right: Frederic Zenhausern with Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine researchers Jerome Lacombe, Ali Fattahi, Jian Gu; Kaitlyn Janssen, an Arizona State University undergraduate student studying biomedical engineering; Jasmine Devadhasan; and Alexander Summers.

Space flight is not just for astronauts and rocket scientists anymore. SpaceX Inspiration4, the world’s first all-civilian mission, will make the dream of orbiting Earth come true for a crew of civilians on Sept. 15. Researchers with the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, led by center director Frederic Zenhausern, will provide the first in-flight testing of multiple biomarkers of stress, inflammation and immunity measured in a zero-gravity environment to monitor the health of the four-member crew.  

The essential task of protecting humans from exposure to hazards is critical to the prospect of future deep space exploration. Zenhausern and his team developed a novel technology that will monitor crew members’ stress, inflammation and immune levels during space flight through a blood droplet from a fingerstick or a saliva sample.

“Our development of advanced molecular diagnostics for multipurpose indications of emerging infectious diseases, health performance or risks of environmental exposure must benefit all populations where possible,” Zenhausern said. “This Inspiration4 mission shares some operational requirements similar to a consumer health product to be performed at home or in low-resources settings, which must be easy to use, minimally invasive, rapid and low cost.”

VeriFAST device
A VeriFAST device.

The Vertical Integrated Flow Assay System Technology, known as VeriFAST, uses blood or saliva deposited onto a device to perform rapid assessments of physiological or molecular effects on humans. The system provides precise measurements, including multiplex molecular diagnostics, to detect possible radiation exposure. The devices have nanoporous membranes printed with arrays of reagents arranged in rows. When the assessments are completed, the spots in the array change color, providing visual results within minutes.

Zenhausern and his team designed the VeriFAST platform to assess a full range of biomarkers, from proteins to genes. While the Inspiration4 mission will take less than a week to complete, it will provide a unique opportunity to apply the VeriFAST platform to help researchers study the molecular and physiological levels in the human body under extreme zero-gravity conditions. One of the biomarkers measured by VeriFAST is the C-reactive protein. The level of that protein in blood has long been used as a diagnostic marker of inflammatory response, including the response occurring in cancer. This biomedical data will offer valuable insights and help inform the measures necessary to protect future astronaut crews in orbit during longer missions.

Zero gravity, confinement and radiation experienced during space flight can have significant health consequences. Space radiation is risky to the human body, potentially causing damage to the DNA in cells. Radiation exposure may occur during deep-space missions and can increase the risk of long-term health consequences such as cancer. Adverse effects to the central nervous and cardiovascular systems may also occur.  It is difficult to determine remotely the health consequences on the tissues and cells of crew members.

“As civilian space travel becomes more frequent and accessible, the university is well positioned to lead in the important, emerging field of aerospace biomedicine,” said Elizabeth “Betsy” Cantwell, the university’s senior vice president for research and innovation. “The new knowledge Dr. Zenhausern’s group will create through SpaceX Inspiration4 is really the tip of the iceberg toward a better understanding of in-flight health.”

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health, known as TRISH, funded the project, which is part of a research complement to be conducted during the multi-day journey. The Inspiration4 crew, commanded by Jared Isaacman, founder and CEO of Shift4 Payments, will contribute to the space biomedical community by participating in important scientific research during the mission. Inspiration4’s goal is to inspire humanity and to advance cancer research through collaboration with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

If the VeriFAST platform is validated by the Inspiration4 crew, it could provide a valuable blood and saliva analysis system to support the health and performance of future space crews. The biomedical samples collected during the Inspiration4 mission will become part of a biobank used for future collaborations by research teams at SpaceX, TRISH and the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix.

“Innovation and problem solving to improve health are at the core of what we do. That impact has been felt in Arizona, around the world and now for those in space,” said Dr. Guy Reed, dean of the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix. “This collaboration with TRISH, SpaceX and the ANBM Center creates synergies that will help to protect humans against radiation injury and other hazards that they encounter during space travel. It will fuel the development of new therapies and preventive strategies for crew members and patients here on Earth and beyond.”

A version of this article originally appeared on the College of Medicine – Phoenix website: https://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/spacex



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UArizona Research Project to Monitor Health of SpaceX Inspiration4 Crew Members During Mission


College Researchers Designed Novel Molecular Diagnostics Technology to Monitor the Health of Four Crew Members during First All-Civilian Mission to Orbit

SpaceX Inspiration4 LogoSpace flight is not just for astronauts and rocket scientists anymore. SpaceX Inspiration4, the world’s first all-civilian mission, will make the dream of orbiting the Earth come true for a crew of civilians September 15. Researchers with the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, led by Frederic Zenhausern, PhD, MBA, will provide the first in-flight testing of multiple biomarkers of stress, inflammation and immunity measured in a zero gravity environment to monitor the health of the four-member crew.

The essential task of protecting humans from exposure to these hazards is critical to the prospect of future deep space exploration. Dr. Zenhausern and his team developed a novel technology that will monitor crew members’ response to measure stress, inflammation and immune levels during space flight through a blood droplet from a simple fingerstick or a saliva sample.

“Our development of advanced molecular diagnostics for multi-purpose indications of emerging infectious diseases, health performance or risks of environmental exposure must benefit all populations where possible,” said Dr. Zenhausern, director of the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine. “This Inspiration4 mission shares some operational requirements similar to a consumer health product to be performed at home or in low resources settings — which must be easy to use, minimally invasive, rapid and low cost.”

The VIFAS Technology
The VIFAS Technology

The Vertical Integrated Flow Assay System (VIFAS) technology uses blood or saliva deposited onto a test strip to perform rapid assessments of radiobiological effects on humans. The system provides precise measurements, including multiplex molecular diagnostics, to possible radiation exposure. The test strips have nanoporous membranes printed with arrays of reagents arranged in rows. When the assessments are completed, the spots in the array change color providing visual results within minutes.

Zenhausern and his team designed the VIFAS technology to assess a full range of biomarkers, from proteins to genes. While the Inspiration4 mission will take less than a week to complete, it will provide a unique opportunity to apply the VIFAS technology to help researchers study the molecular and physiological levels in the human body under extreme zero gravity conditions. This biomedical data will offer valuable insights and help inform the measures necessary to protect future astronaut crews in orbit during longer missions. 

Zero gravity and radiation experienced during space flight can have significant health consequences. Space radiation is risky to the human body, potentially causing damage to the DNA in cells. Radiation exposure may occur during deep-space missions and can increase the risk of long-term health consequences, such as cancer. Adverse effects to the central nervous and cardiovascular systems may also occur. It is difficult to determine remotely the health consequences on the tissues and cells of crew members.

Ali Fattahi, PhD, Works with the VIFAS Technology
Ali Fattahi, PhD, Works with the VIFAS Technology

“As civilian space travel becomes more frequent and accessible, the university is well positioned to lead in the important, emerging field of aerospace biomedicine,” said Elizabeth “Betsy” Cantwell, PhD, the university’s senior vice president for Research and Innovation. “The new knowledge Dr. Zenhausern’s group will create through SpaceX Inspiration4 is really the tip of the iceberg toward a better understanding of in-flight health.”

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) funded the project, which is part of a research complement to be conducted during the multi-day journey. The Inspiration4 crew, commanded by Jared Isaacman, founder and CEO of Shift4 Payments, will contribute to the space biomedical community by participating in important scientific research during the mission.

If the VIFAS platform is validated by the Inspiration4 crew, it could provide a valuable blood and saliva analysis system to support the health and performance of future space crews. The biomedical samples collected during the Inspiration4 mission will become part of a biobank used for future collaborations by research teams at SpaceX, TRISH and the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix.

“Innovation and problem-solving to improve health are at the core of what we do. That impact has been felt in Arizona, around the world and now for those in space,” said Guy Reed, MD, MS, dean of the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix. “This collaboration with TRISH, SpaceX and the Center for ANBM creates synergies that will help to protect humans against radiation injury and other hazards that they encounter during space travel. It will fuel the development of new therapies and preventive strategies for crew members and patients here on Earth and beyond.”



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The theatre returns: Come From Away’s cast and crew reflect on the past year


Why do you think Come From Away resonates with audiences?


Tara: “When you’d explain to somebody what the show is, their faces would screw up. “A show about 9/11?” But it’s not a show about 9/11. It’s about what happens after. And it’s about kindness and humility and what people do in the wake of disaster, and how we all pull together. Once you sit down, it takes you on a journey. And for the audience, it doesn’t really allow you to let go. There isn’t the release of an interval, or lots of applause breaks — so you get caught up in it. And by time you get to the finale, and those passengers are on their plane going home, you’re with them, and your emotions have been all over the place. You’ve laughed, you’ve cried, you’ve felt the anxiety. People start to resonate, because the stories in it are real, they’re personal, and they could happen to anyone.”

Mark: “I come from Belfast, so I come from a very divided community; I grew up with division, and the notion that ‘we’re not meant to like these people’. I just feel like this show just makes us all go, ‘Well, there’s more that brings us together and makes us similar than divides us’. We all want to be kind to each other. We were all brought up to be kind and loving. And I think sometimes we forget it and when we watch the news, it’s just two polar extremes we see. I think this show just reminds us that now, as we’re all human and we’re all good by nature, we want to help each other.”

John: “It tells a really interesting story that a lot of people don’t know. It became a kind of famous Canadian story. But it wasn’t really a famous story anywhere else in the world. When you get into it, it’s a story of coming together. But the key thing is, it’s true. So everything we’re telling you is not preachy; we’re not lecturing, it’s not fantastical, it’s all based in fact. I think we all want to be as good as those guys in Gander. But whether we can be or not, we don’t know until we’re thrown into it. I think, if we were ever stuck, we want to believe people would help us.”

Do you think that audiences will respond to the show in a different way now after their experiences with Covid-19?


John: “I think they’ll personalise it. Instead of it being about other people, on a rock in the middle of the northeast tip of North America, it becomes about the person who lives around the corner from you, the person who made sandwiches or did the shopping for the old lady up the road because she couldn’t get out, or the people who picked someone up and took them to the doctor, or who looked after those who’d lost people. It’s going to be very charged in that theatre. There’s a great saying at the end of the show: we honour what was lost, but we remember what we found. And I think that as we move out of this, we can’t ever forget what we lost. Because we lost so much. But I hope we’ve found things that can make us better.”

Mark: “There are so many things that have happened to me over the last year that would not have happened, were it not for the pandemic. People reaching out. I think it will bring all those things to the fore. It’s probably more relevant now than it’s ever been.”

Tara: “For older audience members, they can remember the disaster and how it felt around the world. But we also get so many young people come and see the show, who haven’t seen that footage and don’t have that emotion. So now, this will be what they relate to. They’ll understand that feeling of being stranded, that feeling of not being able to go out or be where you want to be or see your family. I think when younger people come and see the show, and they see people like Hannah, who is desperate to get back to New York to see her son, they will relate to that. I think there’s going to be so many more layers.”

Where in the world are you looking forward to going when you can?


Tara: “I’m looking forward to my mum coming here. She’s from England and lives in Spain. She normally comes back all the time. We’ve also got friends in Las Vegas that we’re desperate to see, and a beautiful place in Mexico that’s about the only place I’ve really relaxed.”

Mark: “I think my spiritual home is New York. The culture, the theatre, the energy and the buzz. I think that will be the first place I want to go because I just love going to the TKTS booth and booking whatever I can see, and being completely blown away like you always are on Broadway. It breaks my heart to think that the West End and Broadway have been dark for so long. I want to get back there. I’ve realised I don’t travel enough too – what was I waiting for? I’m going to just do it now.”

John: “I lived in New York and I’ve got a lot of friends and family there, so getting back to New York, and getting back to Broadway and seeing the community there. I’d sacrifice that for my wife though, because she’s from Victoria, Vancouver Island, and she hasn’t seen her family in two years. I can’t wait for her to be able to get back and see all her loved ones.”

Come From Away reopens at the Phoenix Theatre, London on 22 July 2021.

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Travel news latest: British Airways facing ‘crew shortage’ as staff told to isolate


Twelve countries including Italy, Germany and Bulgaria are on course to join the quarantine-free green list this week and open up travel to unvaccinated holidaymakers, according to an analysis of official data.

The 12 countries meet the green list criteria used by government scientists to determine if countries’ infection rates, the testing capability, vaccination levels and risk from variants are low enough to justify inclusion.

The 12 also include Canada, Austria, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, Switzerland, Hong Kong and Taiwan and would bring the total of countries on the green list to 39, according to the analysis by Robert Boyle, a former BA strategist whose predictions have been accurate previously.

The Balearic islands of Ibiza, Menorca and Mallorca, Portugal’s Madeira, Malta, Gibraltar and Israel are the only other viable holiday destinations on the green or green watch list, which has been expanded only once since it was launched last month.

Read the full story.





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Movie Crew Filming On I-93 In Boston, Charlestown, Somerville Wednesday – CBS Boston






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Travel news: British Airways crew put back on furlough amid travel restriction uncertainty | Travel News | Travel


The carrier has been forced to furlough thousands of employees again as the wait for a return of international travel continues. BA has demanded the Government to ease restrictions and to move the US to the green list “at the next available opportunity”.

BA had begun to bring workers back to work on May 17, the date the Government set for the restart of international travel.

However, and after the traffic light system review last week, it seems like the summer season is over for the carrier.

With Portugal moved back to the amber list and only 11 countries on the green list – but none of them a significant holiday destination – thousands of staff are being put back onto the furlough scheme.

The carrier had already cut more than 8,000 jobs last year, which was the worst downturn in aviation history.

READ MORE: Expats: Britons ‘should look to Portugal instead of Spain’

A British Airways’ spokesperson said: “Like many companies, we’re using the furlough scheme to protect jobs during this unprecedented crisis.

“However, it’s vital the Government follows its risk-based framework to re-open international travel as soon as possible, putting more low-risk countries, like the US, on its green list at the next available opportunity.”

Taking to social media, crew and other employees have expressed their frustration with the ongoing travel restrictions.

“Well done @BorisJohnson Aer Lingus calls in liquidator for Stobbart Air whilst British Airways furlough more staff. You are determined to keep US-UK travel corridor shut and destroy the economy.

DON’T MISS

“Get it open for vaccinated people. There is no reason to delay,” said a crew member.

“BA staff are back on furlough. We are all going to be struggling, we need to stand up now, we’ve got nothing to lose anymore. Enough is enough,” said another.

British Aiways’ CEO Sean Doyle has called for the urgent reopening of the UK-US travel corridor, one of his airline’s key routes.

“We urgently need them to look to the science and base their judgements on a proper risk analysis, allowing us all to benefit from the protection offered by our successful vaccine rollouts”, said Doyle.

UK airline bosses wrote to Prime Minister Boris Johnson last week to demand the travel corridor between UK and the US as the “critical next step”.

During the G7 summit, the Secretary of State for Transport announced that the UK will begin to work on resuming travel with the US.

“We’re pleased to announce a joint UK/US Taskforce to help facilitate the reopening of transatlantic travel,” he said.

However, no progress on the traffic light system is expected to be announced before the Government decides on its domestic policy.

The Government made it clear that its priority at the moment is the easing of the domestic lockdown on June 21.

After that, the travel list will be reviewed again around June 24.

There is hope that more countries will be added to the green list, and restrictions will be eased at least for vaccinated travellers.

BA staff are planning to take the streets of London next week to protest against the current travel restrictions.





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Delta Flight Crew Finds Letter Left In Cockpit A Year After Plane Was Parked


Chris Dennis knew things weren’t good when he boarded a Delta Airlines A321 to fly from Minnesota to California last March. But the first officer had no idea how bad things were about to become.

Dennis walked through the airport in Minneapolis on March 23, 2020, just like he had countless times before during his 25 years as a pilot. But things were different on that day. The airport was virtually empty, and his airplane was as well, except for a bare-bones crew.

His assignment that day was to fly the Delta A321 to Victorville Airport in the California desert, where the plane would be parked as flights were halted at the start of the coronavirus pandemic. Dennis assumed the plane would be there for two weeks. His estimate was off by 421 days.

Shock In The Desert

The aircraft Dennis flew to Victorville, where it was parked with much of Delta’s fleet, was the last to leave the desert at the start of this month. After 435 days.

“It wasn’t until we were on final approach headed in for landing when it hit me,” Dennis said in a Delta news release. “The VCV [Victorville] instructions noted to go behind a follow-me vehicle that brings you to a parking spot.”

“It’s hard to fathom how many aircraft Delta has until you see that many of them parked in one place,” he continued. “When we got in line, it looked like an optical illusion. It just kept going and going. I don’t know how to describe it. It was shocking.”

Overcome by what he was seeing and feeling, Dennis wrote a note, stuck it in a tray table, and shut the table in its locked position.

Letter from Delta pilot, "A Pandemic Time Capsule."
Delta News Hub

A Memento

Last week, that note was found by pilot Nick Perez, who was there to pick up the plane and put it back into the Delta flight rotation.

“Hey pilots,” the handwritten note reads. “It’s March 23rd and we just arrived from MSP. Very chilling to see so much of our fleet here in the desert. If you are here to pick it up, then the light must be at the end of the tunnel. Amazing how fast it changed. Have a safe flight bringing it out of storage!”

The gravity of the note hit Perez, he said, and he wondered what Dennis had been thinking at the time of its writing.

“He had to have been thinking he was leaving his job,” Perez said. “Back in March, I was 100 percent certain I was going to lose my job.”

Dennis said he wasn’t only worried about his job on the day he parked the airplane, but everyone else as well.

“I thought about how many people’s jobs rely on just one of those airplanes,” Dennis said. “From the reservations agent to the ticket agent to the pilot, flight attendants, mechanics, the ramp crew. Then you go a level deeper: the rental car agency, the hotels, the tourism companies.”

Thoughts Of A Brighter Future

As Perez prepared to fly the aircraft out of the desert, his thoughts were of a brighter future. “I kept thinking about my mindset now compared to his when he left this note,” Perez said. “[Back then] we were getting good at landing empty airplanes. Now we’re going in the right direction. I’m in good spirits. I’m very optimistic.”

Dennis is feeling better as well. “As they get into that airplane, they are going to see the opposite view than I saw,” Dennis said. “There’s going to be an open runway in front of them.”

Want more heartwarming stories? Consider our inspire content and read up on the lost WWII love song that fulfilled a grandmother’s dream.



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American Airlines flight from Australia to Los Angeles canceled after crew member tests positive for COVID-19 – USA TODAY



American Airlines flight from Australia to Los Angeles canceled after crew member tests positive for COVID-19  USA TODAY



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Ex British Airways cabin crew advises keeping shoes on during flight in case of evacuation | Travel News






Ex British Airways cabin crew advises keeping shoes on during flight in case of evacuation | Travel News | Travel » TechnoCodex




















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