Reminders for SBU Community About International and Domestic Travel |


Spring campus fountain 2Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Paul M. Goldbart and Vice President for Research Richard J. Reeder have shared with the campus community reminders about international and domestic travel. The message reads as follows:

Dear Stony Brook Community,

As the academic year unfolds, here are a few reminders about international and domestic travel.

State and federal health guidelines continue to recommend avoiding international and domestic travel unless travelers are fully vaccinated. If travel is necessary, CDC provides recommendations of precautionary measures.

All Stony Brook faculty, staff, and graduate student employees planning domestic or international travel to conduct research, attend a conference, or participate in other University business must abide by the following instructions for pre-approval. We advise prospective travelers to obtain pre-approval prior to booking any travel arrangements.

  • For State-Funded Travel and Non-Sponsored Research Travel: All domestic and international travel requires pre-approval, which can be requested through the Concur system.
  • For Sponsored Research Travel: No pre-approval is required for domestic travel. International travel requires pre-approval by utilizing the Electronic Foreign Travel Request portal (eFTR).

All prospective travelers for research should review the guidance for travel on sponsored research awards administered through the Research Foundation. All international travelers should review the Export Controls guidance.

Concur System Implementation: Starting in October 2021, the SBU Travel Program began implementing the Concur Travel Expense Reimbursement system. Please visit our website to learn more about Concur and register for training. All travelers should review the current Covid-19 Travel Reimbursement guidelines to ensure compliance in advance of any travel.

Travel Risk Level: International travelers should check the U.S. Department of State to stay updated on the level of risk associated with their destination. Most nations at this time have been identified as high risk, according to CDC and NYS Department of Health.

Sincerely,

Paul M. Goldbart Provost & Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs

Richard J. Reeder, Vice President for Research

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Annastacia Palaszczuk’s comments about COVID-19 travel overseas perplexes Queensland’s Indian community


Pooja Manchanda hasn’t been home to see her family in nearly three years.

“All the family is back home in India, so here in Australia it’s just me, my husband and my son now,” she said

Her son has spent the first two years of his life without meeting his extended family.

“It makes it a little … more difficult for people like us — we don’t have support when we really need it,” she said.

“All through my pregnancy — and of course the first few days and weeks of motherhood — when you don’t know what’s happening, how you’re supposed to deal with the baby and everything, that’s the time when you really miss your family.”

‘Where are you going to go?’

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‘What do you want to go?’: Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk

When asked about international travel yesterday, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk shot back at reporters.

“Well, where are you going to go? Are you going to go to India?” she said.

“In Tokyo you have to sit in Perspex screens with masks on, and if you remove your mask you can’t talk while you’re eating.

“Yes in Europe some people are travelling. I think the federal government needs to identify very clearly what are the countries that Australians can travel to.”

Ms Manchanda said those comments were uncalled for.

Rachita Narula wants to know why the Premier singled out India.

“Why only India?” she said.

“I feel so many people living here in Australia, they do have families in Europe and other parts of Asia as well and yes, we have to meet our families, we need to go to India.”

Not about travelling, but reuniting with family

For Ms Narula, it’s not about taking a holiday but seeing her elderly parents who live alone and her in-laws who were both hospitalised with COVID-19.

“It is tough I cannot deny that, because my parents are all by themselves and they are old,” she said.

“My dad had a stroke a few years ago and he’s paralysed, he doesn’t drive.

“My mum doesn’t drive at all and they’re in a small town in India and accessibility to basics is not so easy there.”

It’s a tough situation for Ms Manchanda.

“Of course we try to do video calls and face time … but nothing can replace a physical touch.”

Dr Mohit Shahi, his wife Rachita Narula and daughter Eugenia sits on a couch in their Brisbane home
Rachita Narula, with husband Dr Mohit Shahi and daughter Eugenia, wants to know why the Premier singled out India.(

ABC News: Alice Pavlovic

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It comes as Queensland recorded one new locally acquired COVID-19 case linked to the Sunnybank cluster.

Asking for an explanation

Shyam Das, the president of the Federation of Indian Communities of Queensland, said there were roughly 75,000 people within Queensland’s Indian community and many are disappointed with the Premier’s comments.

“Why [is] India always being singled out?” he said.

“The pandemic isn’t only happening in India — it’s happening all over the world.”

He would like the Premier to explain “in what context she used that word India”.

“If that clarification is not up to what we are expecting, then definitely an apology would be good,” Mr Das said.

Ms Manchanda would like to see Ms Palaszczuk to explain her comments.

“…There could be a reasonable or rationale in her mind, which wasn’t clear which wasn’t expressed so yes, she definitely needs to express it a little bit more.”

‘Sincere best wishes for India’

In a statement to the ABC, a spokesperson for the Premier’s office said Ms Palaszczuk was highlighting “the problem of approving international travel anywhere, if the federal government doesn’t identify which countries Australians could travel to”.

“The Premier has clearly conveyed Queensland’s sincere best wishes for India, including a $2 million donation to the Red Cross in May this year following a meeting with leaders of the Indian community.”

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Outbreak: How Australia lost control of the Delta variant

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County Approves Community Corrections Contract, Travel Requests





County Approves Community Corrections Contract, Travel Requests | News Dakota


























JAMESTOWN, N.D. (NewsDakota.com) – The Stutsman County Commission have approved the 2022 contract for Jamestown Community Corrections service.

Sarah Frohlich has been with the program for four years and says they have asked for a small increase from the county.


The motion to accept the 2022 contract was unanimously approved.

Several out of travel requests were brought before the commission including Stutsman County Correctional Center staff, Highway Department staff, and dispatch staff training. All requests were approved.

You can view the full meeting below



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Hackett to lead Travel Southern Oregon | Community




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DHS Secretary Mayorkas to Travel to Miami to Meet With Cuban, Haitian Community Leaders – NBC 6 South Florida


Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas will travel to South Florida on Thursday to meet with members of the local Cuban and Haitian communities to address recent events and update them on the latest actions from the Biden Administration.

Mayorkas plans to meet with Cuban American leaders to “reiterate the Administration’s continued support for the Cuban people,” following last month’s historic demonstrations on the island, a statement from the White House said.

A few attendees of this meeting will include Yotuel Romero, Felice Gorordo, Omar Lopez Montenegro of the Cuban American National Foundation, Emilio Estefan, and activist Rosa Maria Paya.

Mayorkas also plans to meet with Haitian American leaders as Haiti grapples with the devastation of last weekend’s major earthquake. Nearly 2,000 people have died and thousands more are injured.

Meeting attendees will include Chair of the National Haitian American Elected Officials Network Councilman Alix Desulme, Dr. Jean-Philippe Austin of Haitian-Americans for Progress, Family Action Network Movement ED Marleine Bastien, and Amb. Patrick Gaspard.

Mayorkas also plans to pay his respects to the 98 people who died in the Surfside condo collapse in June.

Juan Gonzales from the National Security Council and Nathaly Arriola Maurice from the White House Office of Public Engagement will also meet with Colombian and Venezuelan community leaders.



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BBB Tip: 5 ways local businesses can make a positive community impact | Business


Local businesses provide a host of benefits for communities across the nation, contributing to a diverse and dynamic marketplace that strengthens and reinforces ethical business practices. In addition to the charm and personality local businesses add to a community, they also provide practical benefits such as economic and charitable contributions. As they grow and succeed, local businesses bolster the surrounding area and can make a positive impact on their community in five main ways.

Give back to the community

A common way that a local business can make a positive community impact is through community involvement. Community involvement can take a variety of forms, including:

  • Charity drives. By organizing and hosting a charity drive, local businesses are able to promote causes that are important to them or the community they serve. BBB recommends using a Wise Giving Alliance accredited nonprofit organization, which must pass the BBB Standards for Charity Accountability, and for local businesses to research a chosen charity on Give.org to verify their legitimacy.
  • Partnering with local organizations. By partnering with local organizations, local businesses can give back to their community through donations, sponsorships, volunteering or promotion. It is also a fantastic way to meet local officials and community leaders, strengthening the relationship between the business and the community they serve.
  • Volunteering at community events. Interacting and volunteering at local events, such as holiday events or park cleanup initiatives, is a great way to demonstrate a local business’ values and dedication to their community. It is also a fantastic networking opportunity for a local business to understand the needs of their community and how best they could serve those needs.

Create a unique community identity

A street block of local businesses has a much greater cultural value than one with large chain stores. Each small business brings a measure of unique character to the community, and long-established local businesses eventually become a part of the community identity, history and culture.

Local businesses are most often owned by members of the community themselves and form meaningful relationships with their customers. Communities take pride in their unique culture and identity and often appreciate local businesses that they feel personally invested in as customers and employees.

Contribute to a community’s economic health

As a business becomes more successful and profitable, this success is recycled back into the local economy. Due to the fact that a local business must pay local taxes, a portion of their revenue goes directly back into the community. Additionally, many local businesses source services and goods that they require from other businesses in the area rather than from large corporations, strengthening the overall business community.

When local businesses are more successful, they create new job opportunities for the local population. These workers will often spend the money they earn through the job in the local market, promoting business growth and contributing to local economic development.

Inspire, innovate and compete

As a local business grows and succeeds, other community members might be inspired to start a business of their own. When those new businesses grow, they generate competition and the need for innovation, resulting in a diverse set of local businesses that are all striving to meet the needs of the community in unique ways.

Small businesses can also provide hiring and training opportunities to the community, teaching people the necessary skills to eventually run their own local business.

Promote environmental friendliness

Local businesses tend to have a lighter environmental and infrastructural impact than large chain businesses. Small businesses can usually take advantage of original or remodeled historical buildings and can often be operated from home, minimizing the environmental impact of office buildings and travel.

Local retailers and manufacturers can also produce, access and distribute goods in more sustainable ways. Manufacturers can access materials locally, restaurants can source their food and supplies from community farms and businesses can distribute goods locally, lowering emissions from transportation and freight.

To learn how you can help support local businesses, visit BBB.org.

Katie Galan is the regional director for BBB serving the Heart of Texas. She can be reached at 844-222-4968 or kgalan@corpuschristi.bbb.org.





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Community members in Western Oregon eager to travel this year for long holiday weekend


EUGENE, Ore. — A year ago, concerns about the spread of the coronavirus completely halted the travel industry, but community members are now expressing an eagerness to travel again.

KEZI 9 News spoke with several people both in, and traveling to Eugene to learn about their level of comfort with traveling as most COVID-19 restrictions have been lifted in Oregon.

Resident Leanne Wolf-Webber said she recently returned to Eugene from a trip to Seattle. She said she didn’t have any concerns about her travel.

“I feel much more comfortable this year than I did last year,” Wolf-Webber said. 

Kevin Marks, Missouri resident, flew in through Eugene Airport terminals on Saturday, and for him, it was business as usual.

“I’ve been traveling over the last year about once a month, so travel’s been about the same,” Marks said.

He did mention a noticeable increase in the amount of people on the plane this weekend.

For many, the increase in vaccination rates and loosening of COVID-19 restrictions played a big role in their willingness to travel. 

“I don’t feel afraid to travel which is good because last year ther were so many unknowns,” resident Kristen Slay said.

While many expressed comfort, some people still feel apprehensive.

Marty Vielma said she recently returned to Oregon on a trip, but she believes people should still pay attention to coronavirus updates.

“There’s still a little bit of apprehension about it. I definitely want to stay up on the latest research,” Vielma said.





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Money coming to keep grocer open in Washington-Canada border community


SEATTLE — Money is on the way to help save the only grocery store in an isolated Washington state community that’s been especially strained by the pandemic-related closure of the U.S.-Canada border.

About 1,300 people live on Point Roberts, on the tip of a peninsula south of Vancouver, British Columbia, that juts into U.S. territory. It’s part of Washington, but separated from the rest of the state.

Before the pandemic residents often traveled into Canada to shop, work or drive the 25 miles (40 km) through southern British Columbia to reach the U.S. mainland. Canadian shoppers and tourists, meanwhile, have been a big source of revenue for the point’s businesses.

But the border has been closed to nonessential travel since March 2020. The Point Roberts International Marketplace, the community’s only grocery store, has lost many of its customers.

Gov. Jay Inslee announced Tuesday that Washington would give $100,000 from its strategic reserves to support the market, which faced closure on July 15.

The money will help keep the market afloat until the border reopens, preserving its 10 jobs and avoiding a food security crisis, Inslee said. The market might even be able to add three employees once business picks up.

“While all Washington communities have been impacted, the situation up there is unique,” Inslee said in a news release. “This action is a small bridge to support the entire community and retain a critical employer. I urge the U.S. and Canadian governments to take rapid and meaningful steps to reopen travel across the U.S.-Canada land border, consistent with public health guidelines.”

The market’s owner, Ali Hayton, said she remains frustrated by the border closure but is thankful for the governor’s support, which she said would help “stop the hemorrhaging” at her store. Other businesses and residents in Point Roberts continue to need help, she said.

“As a business owner, I have never wanted a hand-out; I just want my customers back,” Hayton said.

The market has been losing $30,000 a month without its Canadian customers and owners of second homes who haven’t returned to Point Roberts, she told Northwest News Network last week. The most recent extension of the border closure — through July 21 — had pushed her to the brink, Hayton said.

Point Roberts leaders have been calling for a border reopening exemption for their community, going so far as coming up with a plan to offer surplus vaccine to Canadian visitors. They insist they don’t pose a public health threat to Canadians because about 85% of the community’s residents are fully vaccinated.

Inslee has repeatedly asked Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, without luck, that Point Roberts residents be allowed to travel directly through southern British Columbia to re-enter the U.S. mainland at Blaine. Trudeau has acknowledged the difficulty the border closures have caused some communities, but he has cautioned against reopening too hastily.





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Money coming to keep grocer in US-Canada border community


SEATTLE (AP) — Money is on the way to help save the only grocery store in an isolated Washington state community that’s been especially strained by the pandemic-related closure of the U.S.-Canada border.

About 1,300 people live on Point Roberts, on the tip of a peninsula south of Vancouver, British Columbia, that juts into U.S. territory. It’s part of Washington, but separated from the rest of the state.

Before the pandemic residents often traveled into Canada to shop, work or drive the 25 miles (40 km) through southern British Columbia to reach the U.S. mainland. Canadian shoppers and tourists, meanwhile, have been a big source of revenue for the point’s businesses.

But the border has been closed to nonessential travel since March 2020. The Point Roberts International Marketplace, the community’s only grocery store, has lost many of its customers.

Gov. Jay Inslee announced Tuesday that Washington would give $100,000 from its strategic reserves to support the market, which faced closure on July 15.

The money will help keep the market afloat until the border reopens, preserving its 10 jobs and avoiding a food security crisis, Inslee said. The market might even be able to add three employees once business picks up.

“While all Washington communities have been impacted, the situation up there is unique,” Inslee said in a news release. “This action is a small bridge to support the entire community and retain a critical employer. I urge the U.S. and Canadian governments to take rapid and meaningful steps to reopen travel across the U.S.-Canada land border, consistent with public health guidelines.”

The market’s owner, Ali Hayton, said she remains frustrated by the border closure but is thankful for the governor’s support, which she said would help “stop the hemorrhaging” at her store. Other businesses and residents in Point Roberts continue to need help, she said.

“As a business owner, I have never wanted a hand-out; I just want my customers back,” Hayton said.

The market has been losing $30,000 a month without its Canadian customers and owners of second homes who haven’t returned to Point Roberts, she told Oregon Public Broadcasting last week. The most recent extension of the border closure — through July 21 — had pushed her to the brink, Hayton said.

Point Roberts leaders have been calling for a border reopening exemption for their community, going so far as coming up with a plan to offer surplus vaccine to Canadian visitors. They insist they don’t pose a public health threat to Canadians because about 85% of the community’s residents are fully vaccinated.

Inslee has repeatedly asked Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, without luck, that Point Roberts residents be allowed to travel directly through southern British Columbia to re-enter the U.S. mainland at Blaine. Trudeau has acknowledged the difficulty the border closures have caused some communities, but he has cautioned against reopening too hastily.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



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Money coming to keep grocer in US-Canada border community


SEATTLE — Money is on the way to help save the only grocery store in an isolated Washington state community that’s been especially strained by the pandemic-related closure of the U.S.-Canada border.

About 1,300 people live on Point Roberts, on the tip of a peninsula south of Vancouver, British Columbia, that juts into U.S. territory. It’s part of Washington, but separated from the rest of the state.

Before the pandemic residents often traveled into Canada to shop, work or drive the 25 miles (40 km) through southern British Columbia to reach the U.S. mainland. Canadian shoppers and tourists, meanwhile, have been a big source of revenue for the point’s businesses.

But the border has been closed to nonessential travel since March 2020. The Point Roberts International Marketplace, the community’s only grocery store, has lost many of its customers.

Gov. Jay Inslee announced Tuesday that Washington would give $100,000 from its strategic reserves to support the market, which faced closure on July 15.

The money will help keep the market afloat until the border reopens, preserving its 10 jobs and avoiding a food security crisis, Inslee said. The market might even be able to add three employees once business picks up.

“While all Washington communities have been impacted, the situation up there is unique,” Inslee said in a news release. “This action is a small bridge to support the entire community and retain a critical employer. I urge the U.S. and Canadian governments to take rapid and meaningful steps to reopen travel across the U.S.-Canada land border, consistent with public health guidelines.”

The market’s owner, Ali Hayton, said she remains frustrated by the border closure but is thankful for the governor’s support, which she said would help “stop the hemorrhaging” at her store. Other businesses and residents in Point Roberts continue to need help, she said.

“As a business owner, I have never wanted a hand-out; I just want my customers back,” Hayton said.

The market has been losing $30,000 a month without its Canadian customers and owners of second homes who haven’t returned to Point Roberts, she told Oregon Public Broadcasting last week. The most recent extension of the border closure — through July 21 — had pushed her to the brink, Hayton said.

Point Roberts leaders have been calling for a border reopening exemption for their community, going so far as coming up with a plan to offer surplus vaccine to Canadian visitors. They insist they don’t pose a public health threat to Canadians because about 85% of the community’s residents are fully vaccinated.

Inslee has repeatedly asked Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, without luck, that Point Roberts residents be allowed to travel directly through southern British Columbia to re-enter the U.S. mainland at Blaine. Trudeau has acknowledged the difficulty the border closures have caused some communities, but he has cautioned against reopening too hastily.



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