Delta Air Lines Helps New Parents Bring Adopted Son Home After Missed Flight




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New Zeke Emanuel course will bring students to Washington to learn about how policy is made



penn-biden-center-william-snow
PSCI 398 will meet at the Penn Biden Center in Washington, D.C.
Credit: William Snow

Penn Vice Provost for Global Initiatives Ezekiel Emanuel will co-teach a new course this spring that will require students to travel to Washington every Friday.

The course, PSCI 398: How Washington Really Works, will include an equal number of students from Penn and George Mason University, and will be co-taught by Emanuel and George Mason University professor Steve Pearlstein, a Pulitzer Prize winning columnist for The Washington Post. Students from each university will be required to travel from their respective campuses to the Penn Biden Center in Washington each Friday for class from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. 

Penn and the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Paideia Program will provide transportation for Penn students, either by Amtrak stipends or a bus, Emanuel said in an interview with The Daily Pennsylvanian. 

While George Mason’s campus is about 40 minutes from the Penn Biden Center, it takes about two and a half hours to arrive from Penn’s campus, thus taking up the majority of the day on Friday. Still, Emanuel said he hopes that a high number of students are interested in the course.

“The reason we really want to do this course actually in D.C. is the sense of that if you’re not inside Washington, you really have no idea how Washington actually works,” he said. 

The course will feature a number of high profile speakers, with potential speakers listed on the course summary including renowned infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci, former Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, and former liberal think tank president Neera Tanden, who advises President Joe Biden.

Emanuel said that given the unique nature of the class, students who want to enroll must write a paragraph explaining their interest before registering. He said the paragraph, the prioritization of older students, and his goal of having a “diversity of opinions” in the class will decide the 24 students from Penn.

The course will study how policy decisions are made in Washington through a series of eight policy case studies ranging from the 1957 Civil Rights Act to Obamacare. After working at the intersection of health care and policy for a number of years, Emanuel said he found many people lack knowledge about how policy is actually made.

The course will also teach students how to read the news, something Emanuel said he finds many people do not truly understand.

“When you read an article in the newspaper there are so many motives to consider. Who is quoted in the article? Who tipped it? Why did they tip it?” Emanuel said. “If you’re not in Washington, you just don’t understand this stuff.”

Each class will be split into three one-hour sections: one hour of lecture and presentation by Emanuel and Pearlstein, one hour of lunch — provided by the universities — with the guest speaker, and a final hour for group discussion.

Emanuel said he and Pearlstein have long wanted to co-teach a course, particularly one that would bring the Penn and George Mason student bodies together to learn from one another. Pearlstein is a decorated journalist and someone who “knows all there is to know about how things work in D.C,” making him a great person to teach the course with, Emanuel said.

“Steve [Pearlstein] and I have a lot of experience combined. He knows Washington in a way very few others really do. So for us, it is sort of exciting to bring all of this experience together to teach this course,” Emanuel said.





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This climate activist from Colombia believes events like COP26 can bring change : Goats and Soda – NPR



This climate activist from Colombia believes events like COP26 can bring change : Goats and Soda  NPR



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Travel center would bring restaurants, store to Greenville’s east edge | Local News


A proposed travel center is expected to bring two new restaurants to the east edge of Greenville.

The Greenville City Council is scheduled to consider whether to approve a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) for the project during the regular session agenda, starting at 6 p.m. Tuesday in the Fletcher Warren Civic Center 5501 Highway 69 South. A work session is also scheduled starting at 5 p.m.

A public hearing is scheduled Tuesday prior to the council’s final vote on whether to approve the conditional use permit for the travel center/truck stop.

In a memo to the council, Community Development Director Steve Methven said the business would be built at 3000 Interstate 30 East.

“The applicant met with City Staff several weeks ago and stated he wanted to build a new Roadster Travel Center,” Methven said.

The new center would require the tearing down of an existing business, but Methven said the CUP shouldn’t affect the few houses in the area as they are several hundred feet away from the location and across the four-lane interstate highway.

The business would include a convenience store in the middle, a new International House of Pancakes (IHOP) on one side and a new Sonic Drive-In at the other end.

“These would all be contained in one single building,” Methven said. “There will be fuel pumps in the front for travelers and the truck pumps will be in the rear along with truck scales and a rest area.”

The Planning and Zoning Commission conducted a public hearing on the proposed CUP Oct. 18 and voted unanimously to recommend approval to the council.





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Bring it on home: Hawaii | Travel


Who and where • Barb Barrett of Ballwin and son Ryan Barrett of San Francisco in the Waipio Valley on the Big Island of Hawaii.

The trip • Ryan has been working remotely for over a year and thought Hawaii would be a great place to work from for a while, then vacation. Barb joined him and they enjoyed beaches, seeing a volcano at night and watching stunning sunsets.

Travel tip • They bought a guide book that was just for this island and “we’re very glad we did,” says Barb.

Contribute • Email your photo to stlpost@gmail.com. Include the full names of everyone in the photo, including where they are from and where you are standing in the photo. Also include your address and phone number. Please also tell us a little about the trip and a travel tip. We’re looking for interesting, well-composed, well-lighted photos.

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Gabby Petito’s parents travel to the Wyoming to bring her remains home


More than a month after her body were discovered in Wyoming’s Bridger-Teton National Forest, Petito’s family traveled to Wyoming to receive her remains and prepare to lay to rest the young woman whose death has drawn intense interest while sparking conversations about the large number of missing persons cases each year — and why others don’t get as much attention.

The funeral director at Valley Mortuary, Tyson Clemons, told CNN her remains were picked up Saturday.

Last week, Dr. Brent Blue, the Teton County Coroner, told CNN that he released Petito’s remains to the mortuary on Tuesday, the same day he announced his long-awaited determination on the manner and cause of her death.

Blue had made an initial ruling that Petito, who did not return from a summer road trip with her fiancé Brian Laundrie, died by homicide. On Tuesday, he elaborated to say her death was caused by manual strangulation and that he believes she was strangled by a human being.
Blue was not able to pinpoint the day or time Petito died, but he did add that her body was left in the wilderness for three to four weeks.

Photos posted by the family on Twitter show them in Wyoming, honoring Petito amid the beautiful scenery she took in during the final days of her life.

“I just, I hope that she didn’t suffer and that she wasn’t in any pain. That she was in a place that she wanted to be, looking at the beautiful mountains,” her mother, Nichole Schmidt, told 60 Minutes Australia.

Tension and conflict in her final weeks

The investigation into who killed Petito and what happened leading up to her death is ongoing, with many more questions still unanswered.

Petito had been traveling with Laundrie in a van across the US for much of the summer. But when he returned to the home they lived in with his parents in Northport, Florida, she was not with him.

These families of missing Black people are frustrated with the lack of response to their cases

Shortly after Petito’s parents reported her missing, Laundrie disappeared. Authorities are still searching for him, though he does not face charges in her death.

And Petito’s parents are eager for him to be found.

“I just hope he’s found. I really do … I mean, like, alive,” Joe Petito, Gabby’s father, said to Dr. Phil during an interview with the talk show host that aired in early October. “I want to see him in a jail cell for the rest of his life.”
The time between Petito’s disappearance and the collection of her remains has been marked by revelations of tension and conflict between the couple in her final weeks.
She was first reported missing by her parents on September 11, and after an extensive search, her remains were found September 19 near where their van was last seen three weeks earlier. The national focus on her whereabouts revealed they were involved in a domestic dispute in Utah in August.
A timeline of 22-year-old Gabby Petito's case
On August 12, the couple was stopped by police after a 911 caller told dispatchers he saw a man hitting a woman, according to audio provided by the Grand County Sheriff’s Office in Moab, Utah.

“We drove by and the gentleman was slapping the girl,” the caller said. “Then we stopped. They ran up and down the sidewalk. He proceeded to hit her, hopped in the car and they drove off.”

CNN obtained dispatch audio recordings from the Grand County Sheriff’s office last month that shed more light on what Moab police were told about “some sort of altercation.”

On August 27, a witness observed a “commotion” as Petito and Laundrie were leaving the Merry Piglets Tex-Mex restaurant in Jackson, Wyoming — one of the last reported sightings of Petito before her death.

Petito was in tears and Laundrie was visibly angry, going into and out of the restaurant several times, showing anger toward the staff around the hostess stand, the witness Nina Angelo said.

Angelo told CNN she did not see any violence or physical altercation between Petito and Laundrie.

That day, an “odd text” from Petito worried her mother that something was wrong, according to a police affidavit for a search warrant for an external hard drive found in the couple’s van.

“Can you help Stan, I just keep getting his voicemails and missed calls,” the message read, according to the affidavit. Stan was a reference to Petito’s grandfather, who her mother said Petito never referred to that way, according to a police affidavit.

Petito called her mom regularly, and those conversations appeared to reveal “more and more tension” in Petito’s relationship, according to the affidavit.

The search for Laundrie

Before he disappeared, police in North Port were surveilling Laundrie as best they legally could, a police spokesperson told CNN’s Randi Kaye.

Investigators said Laundrie’s parents told them on September 17 he had left home days earlier and was headed to the nearby Carlton Reserve — sparking a search of the nature reserve’s 25,000 acres. Initially, his parents said he left on September 14, but Laundrie family attorney Steven Bertolino later said, “We now believe the day Brian left to hike in the preserve was Monday, September 13.”

Time and environmental factors are complicating the search for Brian Laundrie, experts say
When he left, he didn’t take his cell phone and wallet with him, and his parents were concerned he might hurt himself, a source close to Laundrie’s family told CNN’s Chris Cuomo.
Laundrie has not been charged in Petito’s death. He was indicted on charges of allegedly using two financial accounts that did not belong to him in the days following her death.

In a statement , Laundrie’s family attorney Steve Bertolino said Laundrie had used a debit card that belonged to Petito but noted he was not a suspect in her death.

CNN’s Rebekah Riess, Rob Frehse, Jennifer Henderson, Christina Maxouris, Kari Pricher, Leyla Santiago, Jenn Selva, Amir Vera and Steve Almasy contributed to this report.



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Gabby Petito’s parents travel to Wyoming to bring her remains home


By Madeline Holcombe, CNN

After heartbreaking and revealing details about the circumstances of her death were announced to the public, Gabby Petito’s parents are finally bringing home the remains of their 22-year-old daughter.

More than a month after her body were discovered in Wyoming’s Bridger-Teton National Forest, Petito’s family traveled to Wyoming to receive her remains and prepare to lay to rest the young woman whose death has drawn intense interest while sparking conversations about the large number of missing persons cases each year — and why others don’t get as much attention.

The funeral director at Valley Mortuary, Tyson Clemons, told CNN her remains were picked up Saturday.

Last week, Dr. Brent Blue, the Teton County Coroner, told CNN that he released Petito’s remains to the mortuary on Tuesday, the same day he announced his long-awaited determination on the manner and cause of her death.

Blue had made an initial ruling that Petito, who did not return from a summer road trip with her fiancé Brian Laundrie, died by homicide. On Tuesday, he elaborated to say her death was caused by manual strangulation and that he believes she was strangled by a human being.

Blue was not able to pinpoint the day or time Petito died, but he did add that her body was left in the wilderness for three to four weeks.

Photos posted by the family on Twitter show them in Wyoming, honoring Petito amid the beautiful scenery she took in during the final days of her life.

“I just, I hope that she didn’t suffer and that she wasn’t in any pain. That she was in a place that she wanted to be, looking at the beautiful mountains,” her mother, Nichole Schmidt, told 60 Minutes Australia.

Tension and conflict in her final weeks

The investigation into who killed Petito and what happened leading up to her death is ongoing, with many more questions still unanswered.

Petito had been traveling with Laundrie in a van across the US for much of the summer. But when he returned to the home they lived in with his parents in Northport, Florida, she was not with him.

Shortly after Petito’s parents reported her missing, Laundrie disappeared. Authorities are still searching for him, though he does not face charges in her death.

And Petito’s parents are eager for him to be found.

“I just hope he’s found. I really do … I mean, like, alive,” Joe Petito, Gabby’s father, said to Dr. Phil during an interview with the talk show host that aired in early October. “I want to see him in a jail cell for the rest of his life.”

The time between Petito’s disappearance and the collection of her remains has been marked by revelations of tension and conflict between the couple in her final weeks.

She was first reported missing by her parents on September 11, and after an extensive search, her remains were found September 19 near where their van was last seen three weeks earlier. The national focus on her whereabouts revealed they were involved in a domestic dispute in Utah in August.

On August 12, the couple was stopped by police after a 911 caller told dispatchers he saw a man hitting a woman, according to audio provided by the Grand County Sheriff’s Office in Moab, Utah.

“We drove by and the gentleman was slapping the girl,” the caller said. “Then we stopped. They ran up and down the sidewalk. He proceeded to hit her, hopped in the car and they drove off.”

CNN obtained dispatch audio recordings from the Grand County Sheriff’s office last month that shed more light on what Moab police were told about “some sort of altercation.”

On August 27, a witness observed a “commotion” as Petito and Laundrie were leaving the Merry Piglets Tex-Mex restaurant in Jackson, Wyoming — one of the last reported sightings of Petito before her death.

Petito was in tears and Laundrie was visibly angry, going into and out of the restaurant several times, showing anger toward the staff around the hostess stand, the witness Nina Angelo said.

Angelo told CNN she did not see any violence or physical altercation between Petito and Laundrie.

That day, an “odd text” from Petito worried her mother that something was wrong, according to a police affidavit for a search warrant for an external hard drive found in the couple’s van.

“Can you help Stan, I just keep getting his voicemails and missed calls,” the message read, according to the affidavit. Stan was a reference to Petito’s grandfather, who her mother said Petito never referred to that way, according to a police affidavit.

Petito called her mom regularly, and those conversations appeared to reveal “more and more tension” in Petito’s relationship, according to the affidavit.

The search for Laundrie

Before he disappeared, police in North Port were surveilling Laundrie as best they legally could, a police spokesperson told CNN’s Randi Kaye.

Investigators said Laundrie’s parents told them on September 17 he had left home days earlier and was headed to the nearby Carlton Reserve — sparking a search of the nature reserve’s 25,000 acres. Initially, his parents said he left on September 14, but Laundrie family attorney Steven Bertolino later said, “We now believe the day Brian left to hike in the preserve was Monday, September 13.”

When he left, he didn’t take his cell phone and wallet with him, and his parents were concerned he might hurt himself, a source close to Laundrie’s family told CNN’s Chris Cuomo.

Laundrie has not been charged in Petito’s death. He was indicted on charges of allegedly using two financial accounts that did not belong to him in the days following her death.

In a statement , Laundrie’s family attorney Steve Bertolino said Laundrie had used a debit card that belonged to Petito but noted he was not a suspect in her death.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.

CNN’s Rebekah Riess, Rob Frehse, Jennifer Henderson, Christina Maxouris, Kari Pricher, Leyla Santiago, Jenn Selva, Amir Vera and Steve Almasy contributed to this report.



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Latest news updates: England to bring forward more relaxed testing rules for international travel


The UK government aims to relax the testing requirements for international travellers coming to England before schools’ midterm break, which will boost the travel industry reeling from the spread of Covid-19, the transport secretary has said.

The rules will be updated before schools are due to have a week’s half-term holiday from October 26, with an announcement expected in the coming days. The government had said it will change the rules at the end of this month.

“The travel industry, which has been into this crisis first [and] out last, in many ways has suffered hugely — that’s a lot of jobs on the line,” Grant Shapps told Sky News on Friday.

“We are still requiring a test [but] we’re going to move that down from being a PCR test, the expensive ones that you have to send away to a lab, to a lateral flow test,” he added.

Concern has been raised that the removal of PCR tests, which enable genomic sequencing, may make it harder to track the spread of variant strains of Covid-19.

However, Shapps said the rules were supplemented by additional requirements.

“Reassuringly, if you come back from somewhere, you do a lateral flow, you get a positive, then you’ll be able to get a free NHS PCR test in the normal way,” he said.

The transport secretary also welcomed the relaxation of restrictions on travel from the UK to the US, while the US is yet to reopen to British visitors.

“The big one we’re waiting for in November . . . the US has said that they’ll reopen to British visitors,” said Shapps. However, he was unable to provide a specific date for the rule change.



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Bring a backpack, camera, boots and more for your trip


— Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.

Fall is underway and we’ve broken out the aromatic candles, fashionable boots, cozy home goods and other seasonal favorites as an autumn chill fills the air. But one of the best things about this time of year is something that can’t be purchased. I’m talking about the quintessential fall activity that is leaf-peeping, which means taking in all of the beautiful foliage as the leaves change into vibrant hues of red, orange, yellow and everything in between.

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If you’re gearing up for a road trip to take in these glorious sights, there are plenty of handy items we’d recommend coming prepared with for an enjoyable time on the road or any trails along the way. From a high-quality camera to a convenient yet stylish backpack, here are seven top-rated products that will take your road trip to the next level.

How to take a cheap fall foliage trip: Save cash by taking day trips and driving

1. A good camera for snapping photos

The Nikon D3500 takes the power of a bigger camera and shrinks it down into a comfortable, portable package.

While photos don’t quite compare to seeing the wonders of fall foliage in person, it’s always lovely to look back at and appreciate the fall weather. Plus, gorgeous shots of fall trees and leaves always look good in a framed photo for the home or as a gift. That’s why we’d recommend bringing a quality camera with you on your journey.

For beginners looking to get their hands on a DSLR (digital single-lens reflex camera), the Nikon D3500 is a great place to start. We ranked it our number one choice for a beginner camera considering its compact build makes it easy to carry anywhere and it boasts smart features like the ability to send copies of photos directly to your smartphone while you’re capturing shots. 

Get the Nikon D3500 at Amazon for $539.99

2. A cooler for packing snacks

This YETI Hopper will keep things cool for days.

For the road trip ahead, you’ll want to keep meals and snacks like packed sandwiches, fruit or some tasty apple cider. Thankfully, we’ve tested plenty of coolers at Reviewed so you can pick one that’ll actually keep your treats and beverages chilled all day.

For a cooler that’ll stay in the car or for a casual daytime hike, the Yeti Hopper Two 30 is our best overall choice from all the soft coolers we’ve tested. Coming from the well-known (and well-loved) brand Yeti, the Hopper is just as durable as the rest of its products with a double-stitched design that ensures no ripping or tearing. As far as insulation goes, it keeps items cooler than other soft coolers we’ve tested. It also has a leakproof zipper that really keeps any melted ice from seeping out. The only drawback is that it’s on the pricier side—but we think it’s worth the price tag.

Get the Hopper M30 Soft Cooler at Yeti for $299.99

3. A cozy jacket for staying warm

This Patagonia fleece is perfect for layering during the fall season.

While we might not be in freezing temperatures yet, but a cozy jacket is necessary for those who are leaf-peeping, especially if you live or are traveling up North. 

A great jacket for layering is the Patagonia Better Sweater Fleece Jacket, which Reviewed’s style writer Kevin Cortez likens to “wearing a blanket in the best way”. The jacket is part of Patagonia’s Better Sweater line, which means it’s made “better” for the environment with 100% recycled polyester sweater-knit fleece. The jacket itself has plenty of useful pockets to keep your cell phone or wallet safe and features an ultra-soft fleece material that’s sure to keep you cozy.

Another top-rated choice for a layering fleece is this Men’s L.L.Bean Sweater Fleece Full-Zip Jacket—don’t worry, this style is also available in women’s sizing, too. Reviewers love this lightweight jacket for its quality make and variety of bold colors.

4. A comfortable pair of hiking boots

These top-rated boots can really be worn anywhere— but are especially useful out on any hiking trails.

Look, even if you’re just making a few pit stops to peek at the foliage, a solid pair of hiking boots should be packed in your bag. Regardless of a trail’s difficulty level, we’d recommend a quality pair that’ll prepare you for hiking, especially in chilly weather.

The Timberland Mt. Maddsen boots. which comes in both men’s and women’s sizes, are top-rated picks on REI. They’re durable, have a proper grip on the sole to ensure good footing and are designed for any weather. One tip, though: Try to break in your hiking boots before your leaf-peeping hike.

5. A top-rated backpack to hold everything

Keep everything safe and organized in a carry-all.

Between your camera, snacks and everything in between, you’ll want to make sure you’ve got a high-quality backpack to store it all in along your journey. A carry-on travel backpack can be useful and versatile, especially for those who love the great outdoors.

Our favorite that we’ve ever tested is the Osprey Ozone Duplex 65 for men—or the Osprey Ozone Duplex 60 counterpart made for women, with the biggest difference between genders being the weight capacity. Both of the Osprey’s offer a perfect blend of durability, smart design and comfort. This carry-all can also be split in half into a smaller day bag and a cargo bag, making it ideal for a casual daytime hike or road trip to a more intensive backpacking trip or hiking endeavor.

6. Our favorite tumbler to keep coffee hot or water cold

Drop tested and approved.

The Yeti brand created our favorite hard and soft coolers, so it’s no surprise that the Yeti Rambler Stainless Steel Water Bottle is our favorite pick for the best water bottle for outdoor use. Yeti’s stainless steel tumblers are one of its most-coveted products for its powerful insulation design, keeping drinks perfectly hot or cold for hours—yes, even in extreme weather.

Another style of the Yeti Rambler—the Rambler 20 Oz. Tumbler—is the perfect mug for sipping freshly brewed coffee, hot chocolate or warm tea as you leaf peep from the car or on a hiking trail. Besides keeping your drinks at that perfect temperature, the Yeti Rambler is durable, dishwasher safe and comes in plenty of stylish colors.

7. Lightweight chairs to sit back and relax in 

Something light and compact like this Flexlite Camp Chair is key for leaf peeping.

Whether you’re headed to a campsite or want to bask in the fall foliage at a lookout point, you’ll want to bring some comfortable, easy-to-carry chairs with you. On our list of products at REI with a cult following is the Flexlite Camp Chair, a lightweight and foldable essential to bring with you on your leaf-peeping trip. Reviewers rave about the Flexlite, saying it’s easy to set up and break down. One reviewer writes, “Nothing beats sitting down in one of these after a long day on the trail.” 

Get the REI Co-op Flexlite Chair from REI for $59.95

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The product experts at Reviewed have all your shopping needs covered. Follow Reviewed on FacebookTwitter and Instagram for the latest deals, reviews and more.

Prices were accurate at the time this article was published but may change over time.





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