Nearly 800 Tuesday flights canceled


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American Airlines and Spirit Airlines have canceled nearly 800 Tuesday flights, the third consecutive day of major travel trouble for the airlines’ passengers.

American, which is still struggling to recover from Sunday storms at its mammoth Dallas hub, canceled 367 Tuesday flights, or 12% percent of its schedule, according to flight tracker FlightAware. The airline canceled 563 Monday flights and nearly 300 Sunday flights. Flight delays have been sizable, too, with 632 American flights, or one in five, affected so far today.

Much smaller Spirit has canceled 419 flights, a staggering 60% of its Tuesday flights. That’s on top of canceling 42% of its Monday flights due to weather and what it called a series of operational challenges.

The airline proactively canceled Tuesday flights “to reset our operations,” spokesman Field Sutton said in a statement.

“We’re working around the clock to mitigate the travel disruptions caused by overlapping operational challenges including weather, system outages and staffing shortages in some areas of the operation,” the statement said.

Frustrated travelers are bombarding social media with tales of travel woes.

American spokesman Curtis Blessing said the airline’s continuing cancellations stem from the ripple effects of “prolonged and severe” weather that started late Sunday and temporarily halted some flights and closed two ramps at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, its home base and largest hub. The airline was forced to cancel and delay flights, and some flights were diverted.

The airline’s pilots union said the airline “can’t keep blaming it on the weather.”

“Weather hits and it hits everybody, and it’s how you recover that you are measured as a reliable operation,” said Dennis Tajer, spokesman for the Allied Pilots Association, which is in contract negotiations with the airline. “American has had this problem every summer.”

Tajer said the majority of Tuesday’s flight cancellations are due to flight crew issues, which he blames on a pilot shortage and what he calls American’s strict scheduling system that doesn’t allow pilots to help the airline out in times of crisis for fear it will disrupt the airline’s operations in the future. (Pilots have limits on maximum hours worked.)

“We have pilots that are ready to fly, but their schedules are locked down,” he said.

“There’s a fire at their (American management’s) feet and they’re pouring gasoline on it instead of allowing us to help them with water.”

Blessing blamed the flight crew issues on the lengthy flight delays and diversions, which forced crews to time out. He said American worked throughout the day Monday to reposition its planes and its crews.





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Should you suspend travel over the delta COVID-19 variant? Experts speak out.


Recent CDC data shows coronavirus infections from the delta COVID-19 variant have continued to rise in the U.S. and this fact might leave travelers wondering if it’s worth taking vacations they had planned.

Depending on your household’s circumstances, suspending travel could be an ideal option, a worthwhile consideration or an unneeded step, according to medical experts.

“There are no one-size-fits-all answers,” Dr. Brad Younggren, the chief medical officer at 98point6 Inc. – a text-based primary care app, told Fox News. 

He went on, “Each family should consider their risks and weigh them against the potential benefits of travel, applying their personal level of risk tolerance.”

CDC, STATE DEPARTMENT, ISSUE HIGHEST WARNINGS AGAINST TRAVEL TO UK OVER RISE IN COVID CASES

Younggren noted that families who have members with “high personal risks,” including age, immune suppression or underlying severe illness, should be thought of before making a move to cancel or proceed with travel arrangements.

Dr. Brad Younggren,  the chief medical officer at 98point6 Inc., tells Fox News that travelers need to consider the health risks of their group before they follow through on plans.

Dr. Brad Younggren,  the chief medical officer at 98point6 Inc., tells Fox News that travelers need to consider the health risks of their group before they follow through on plans.
(iStock)

Travelers should also look into the current infection rates of their desired travel destination and be aware of potential vaccination requirements and other COVID-19 policies ahead of departure, according to Younggren.

Knowing these details in advance will help travelers determine if they are “prepared and comfortable” with going through with their trip, Younggren said. 

Some locations may have mandates in place that require travelers to wear masks outdoors and or indoors.

NEW CORONAVIRUS VARIANTS SEEN AS TOO CONTAGIOUS FOR HOTEL QUARANTINES

Travelers should take “general COVID safety” precautions of their own “to remain safe while vacationing,” Dr. Kate Tulenko, the founder and CEO of Corvus Health – a global health systems and health workforce services firm, told Fox News.

Common precautions include practicing hand hygiene, social distancing and wearing protective face masks in “crowded indoor areas or high-risk situations,” according to Tulenko.

“Vaccinated low-risk people and unvaccinated low-risk people who are taking standard precautions…can most likely continue their plans,” she added.

Dr. Kate Tulenko, the founder and CEO of Corvus Health, tells Fox News that vaccinated and unvaccinated people who are considered "low-risk" can pursue their travel plans, but they should still take precautions to guard themselves from COVID-19.

Dr. Kate Tulenko, the founder and CEO of Corvus Health, tells Fox News that vaccinated and unvaccinated people who are considered “low-risk” can pursue their travel plans, but they should still take precautions to guard themselves from COVID-19.
(iStock)

Tulenko told Fox News that some unvaccinated people who wish to enjoy travel in the near future could benefit from speaking with their physician about potential vaccination, so they can move throughout the world with a level of protection.

6 PEOPLE TEST POSITIVE FOR COVID-19 AFTER CARIBBEAN CRUISE   

But, for people who are considered “high risk,” Tulenko recommended against travel regardless of their vaccinations. At this time she’s suggested high-risk groups, “seriously consider rearranging their plans.”

“Regarding canceling your reservations, many airlines and hotel chains are allowing cancellations and giving credit for future travel,” Tulenko said. “Due to the fact that many people are not traveling internationally, it is usually easy for a domestic hotel to fill the vacancy once you have canceled.”

While each person is responsible for determining the level of risk they’re willing to take, Tulenko reiterated that “people should consider the health risk of everyone in their group, including the people they will be visiting.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Younggren noted that COVID-19 vaccines for children under the age of 12 aren’t available yet and likely won’t be “until potentially late fall to early winter.” 

Dr. Brad Younggren noted that COVID-19 vaccines for children under the age of 12 aren’t available yet. Currently, the CDC advises mask wear and social distancing for unvaccinated children who are put into public settings.

Dr. Brad Younggren noted that COVID-19 vaccines for children under the age of 12 aren’t available yet. Currently, the CDC advises mask wear and social distancing for unvaccinated children who are put into public settings.
(iStock)

Parents can take precautions against the novel coronavirus and its “emerging variants,” by following CDC recommendations for children over the age of 2, Younggren said.

Currently, the CDC advises mask wear and social distancing for unvaccinated children who are put into public settings.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

“Not all trips are created equal. If this is a rare or one-time-only event, compared to something that can easily be rescheduled, it is legitimate to consider the risk versus benefits,” Younggren concluded. “COVID-19 is likely to be with us for many years, and we will all need to get used to weighing the risk of disease against some social or personal benefit.”



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Machu Picchu is older than previously thought


(CNN) — The Inca citadel of Machu Picchu in Peru was occupied from around 1420-1530 AD, several decades earlier than previously thought, according to a new study.

A team of researchers, led by Richard Burger, a professor of anthropology at Yale University, used radiocarbon dating to reveal that the emperor Pachacuti, who built Machu Picchu, rose to power earlier than expected, according to a news release published Tuesday.

This means Pachacuti’s early conquests took place earlier, helping to explain how the Inca Empire became the largest and most powerful in pre-Columbian America.

Based on historical documents, it was thought that Machu Picchu was built after 1440, or maybe even 1450. However, Burger and his team used accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) dating of human remains to get a more accurate picture.

AMS works on even small amounts of organic material, which enlarges the pool of skeletons that can be studied. The team looked at 26 individuals from cemeteries at Machu Picchu that were recovered from the site during excavations in 1912.

Machu Picchu is pictured in 1911.

Machu Picchu is pictured in 1911.

Granger Historical Picture Archive/Alamy Stock Photo

The bodies were buried under boulders, overhanging cliffs or shallow caves, sealed with masonry walls, according to the study. There were also grave goods such as ceramics and bronze and silver shawl pins.

“This is the first study based on scientific evidence to provide an estimate for the founding of Machu Picchu and the length of its occupation,” Burger said in the news release.

The historical records were written by Spanish conquistadors following their takeover of the area, and the results of the study question the merit of drawing conclusions based on these kinds of documents, according researchers.

Although the study acknowledges the “limitations” of radiocarbon dating, the researchers said the documentary evidence is unreliable.

“Perhaps the time has come for the radiocarbon evidence to assume priority in reconstructions of the chronology of the Inca emperors and the dating of Inca monumental sites such as Machu Picchu,” reads the study.

The study was published in the journal Antiquity.

Revered as one of the world’s great archaeological sites, Machu Picchu perches between two mountains.

The site is made up of roughly 200 stone structures, whose granite walls remain in good shape although the thatched roofs are long gone.

These include a ceremonial bathhouse, temples, granaries and aqueducts. One, known as the Hut of the Caretaker of the Funerary Rock, is thought to have been used for embalming dead aristocrats.



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Shifting travel guidelines, passport backlog causing issues for travelers


COLUMBUS, Ga. (WRBL) – Despite the Delta variant and COVID cases rising across the country, people are continuing to book vacations into the fall. 

Testing requirements, stay-at-home orders and quarantine protocols continue to shift as case numbers fluctuate around the world. 

The guidelines in place on the day you book your trip may be different than when you leave for vacation. As time goes on, destinations like the Bahamas, Greece, Italy and the U.K. are turning to COVID passports as a way of opening up and letting people travel. 

“It’s a health passport, and they’re making you sign up for these and registering with information on COVID and where your vaccination was and getting QR codes,” said Donna Anderson, owner of Columbus-based travel agency Travels by Donna. “You have to download these before you go and if you don’t have it downloaded, they will deny you from boarding on the flight.”

The U.S. State Department is also dealing with a pandemic-related backlog of about 2 million passport requests.  The influx of demand and lengthy processing delays mean that passports are currently expected to take up to 18 weeks to process. This has created a roadblock for people making international travel plans. 

Anderson says some of her clients have had to cancel their trips due to the backlog. 

“One in the party got theirs but the other one didn’t get it, so they were still on the fence with it,” Anderson said. “When I called in to make that change, one agent—and there’s hundreds of agents that they’ve got at the tour operator—she said I was the fourth one on that day that had cancelled and changed due to the passports.”

This means that applications submitted will likely not be processed until the fall. People looking to get passports now or renew passports may have to save international travel plans for 2022.



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Air New Zealand Sees Larger 2022 Loss After Australia Travel Suspended –Update


By Stephen Wright

WELLINGTON, New Zealand–Air New Zealand Ltd. has forecast its losses to increase after the government suspended quarantine-free travel with Australia for two months.

The airline said its loss for the financial year that ends June 2022 will be as much as 530 million New Zealand dollars ($372 million) before tax and signficant items, compared with a previous forecast of about NZ$450 million.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern’s government halted a travel bubble with Australia in late July because of the risk that the more transmissible Covid-19 Delta variant could reach New Zealand, which has had little more than 2,000 Covid-19 cases and few deaths.

Air New Zealand said Wednesday it will tap a NZ$1.5 billion government loan by the end of August because its operating cashflow has reduced. The carrier, half-owned by the New Zealand government, said it had last drawn on the credit facility in February and its borrowings from it total NZ$350 million.

Air New Zealand, which plans to call on shareholders for a cash injection by the end of September, also has forecast a loss of NZ$450 million for its 2021 financial year due to the pandemic decimating international travel.

Write to Stephen Wright at stephen.wright@wsj.com



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Should you suspend travel over the delta COVID-19 variant? Experts speak out.


Recent CDC data shows coronavirus infections from the delta COVID-19 variant have continued to rise in the U.S. and this fact might leave travelers wondering if it’s worth taking vacations they had planned.

Depending on your household’s circumstances, suspending travel could be an ideal option, a worthwhile consideration or an unneeded step, according to medical experts.

“There are no one-size-fits-all answers,” Dr. Brad Younggren, the chief medical officer at 98point6 Inc. – a text-based primary care app, told Fox News. 

He went on, “Each family should consider their risks and weigh them against the potential benefits of travel, applying their personal level of risk tolerance.”

CDC, STATE DEPARTMENT, ISSUE HIGHEST WARNINGS AGAINST TRAVEL TO UK OVER RISE IN COVID CASES

Younggren noted that families who have members with “high personal risks,” including age, immune suppression or underlying severe illness, should be thought of before making a move to cancel or proceed with travel arrangements.

Dr. Brad Younggren,  the chief medical officer at 98point6 Inc., tells Fox News that travelers need to consider the health risks of their group before they follow through on plans.

Dr. Brad Younggren,  the chief medical officer at 98point6 Inc., tells Fox News that travelers need to consider the health risks of their group before they follow through on plans.
(iStock)

Travelers should also look into the current infection rates of their desired travel destination and be aware of potential vaccination requirements and other COVID-19 policies ahead of departure, according to Younggren.

Knowing these details in advance will help travelers determine if they are “prepared and comfortable” with going through with their trip, Younggren said. 

Some locations may have mandates in place that require travelers to wear masks outdoors and or indoors.

NEW CORONAVIRUS VARIANTS SEEN AS TOO CONTAGIOUS FOR HOTEL QUARANTINES

Travelers should take “general COVID safety” precautions of their own “to remain safe while vacationing,” Dr. Kate Tulenko, the founder and CEO of Corvus Health – a global health systems and health workforce services firm, told Fox News.

Common precautions include practicing hand hygiene, social distancing and wearing protective face masks in “crowded indoor areas or high-risk situations,” according to Tulenko.

“Vaccinated low-risk people and unvaccinated low-risk people who are taking standard precautions…can most likely continue their plans,” she added.

Dr. Kate Tulenko, the founder and CEO of Corvus Health, tells Fox News that vaccinated and unvaccinated people who are considered "low-risk" can pursue their travel plans, but they should still take precautions to guard themselves from COVID-19.

Dr. Kate Tulenko, the founder and CEO of Corvus Health, tells Fox News that vaccinated and unvaccinated people who are considered “low-risk” can pursue their travel plans, but they should still take precautions to guard themselves from COVID-19.
(iStock)

Tulenko told Fox News that some unvaccinated people who wish to enjoy travel in the near future could benefit from speaking with their physician about potential vaccination, so they can move throughout the world with a level of protection.

6 PEOPLE TEST POSITIVE FOR COVID-19 AFTER CARIBBEAN CRUISE   

But, for people who are considered “high risk,” Tulenko recommended against travel regardless of their vaccinations. At this time she’s suggested high-risk groups, “seriously consider rearranging their plans.”

“Regarding canceling your reservations, many airlines and hotel chains are allowing cancellations and giving credit for future travel,” Tulenko said. “Due to the fact that many people are not traveling internationally, it is usually easy for a domestic hotel to fill the vacancy once you have canceled.”

While each person is responsible for determining the level of risk they’re willing to take, Tulenko reiterated that “people should consider the health risk of everyone in their group, including the people they will be visiting.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Younggren noted that COVID-19 vaccines for children under the age of 12 aren’t available yet and likely won’t be “until potentially late fall to early winter.” 

Dr. Brad Younggren noted that COVID-19 vaccines for children under the age of 12 aren’t available yet. Currently, the CDC advises mask wear and social distancing for unvaccinated children who are put into public settings.

Dr. Brad Younggren noted that COVID-19 vaccines for children under the age of 12 aren’t available yet. Currently, the CDC advises mask wear and social distancing for unvaccinated children who are put into public settings.
(iStock)

Parents can take precautions against the novel coronavirus and its “emerging variants,” by following CDC recommendations for children over the age of 2, Younggren said.

Currently, the CDC advises mask wear and social distancing for unvaccinated children who are put into public settings.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

“Not all trips are created equal. If this is a rare or one-time-only event, compared to something that can easily be rescheduled, it is legitimate to consider the risk versus benefits,” Younggren concluded. “COVID-19 is likely to be with us for many years, and we will all need to get used to weighing the risk of disease against some social or personal benefit.”



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Severe travel warning for US, Italy, France and Greece delayed


The measure was originally supposed to come into effect on Friday, but the ministry announced later on Tuesday that it was postponed until Wednesday.

Starting from August 11, all travelers entering Israel from these countries will be required to isolate for a minimum of seven days – even if they are fully vaccinated or recovered.

The nations that were approved to be added to the list are Botswana, Bulgaria, Cuba, Czech Republic, Egypt, Eswatini, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Malawi, Netherlands, Rwanda, Tanzania, Tunisia, Ukraine and the United States.

The list of countries already under a severe travel warning – or colored orange – includes Cambodia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Fiji, Guatemala, Honduras, Kenya, Liberia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Seychelles, Turkey, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

However, according to the recommendation, Costa Rica, Kenya, Liberia, Panama, Paraguay, Seychelles, Uganda and Zambia are going to be removed from the list on Friday.

Israelis are allowed to travel to orange countries, but they need to quarantine when they return – for 14 days, which can be shortened to seven with two negative PCR tests.

On the other hand, the countries considered the highest level of risk – the red ones – are placed under a total travel ban.

Israelis are prohibited from visiting those countries unless they obtain permission from the government’s Exceptions Committee. Those who return are also required to isolate regardless of their immunization status.

This list includes Argentina, Belarus, Brazil, Cyprus, Georgia, Great Britain, India, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico, Russia, Spain, South Africa, Turkey and Uzbekistan.

ISRAEL CURRENTLY determines the status of a country based on a combination of the local level of morbidity and coronavirus trends on the one hand, and on the number of infected inbound travelers from that nation entering Israel on the other. The rate of infection among the travelers is also considered.

According to the data presented by the Health Ministry during the committee’s meeting, some 57,025 passengers arrived in Israel from the US in the past month. Of those, some 141 were infected with the virus, or 0.25%.

Moreover, the US currently presents a weekly average of 155 cases per million people, 1,736 active cases per million people according to an epidemiological model developed by Imperial College London (ICL) and 969 according to one by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME).

Regarding France, some 17,429 passengers traveled to Israel in the past month, with 42 of them found to be infected (or 0.24%). In addition, France currently presents a weekly average of 262 cases per million people, 224 active cases per million people according to the ICL model and 558 according to the IHME version.

Some 11,065 people have traveled to Israel from Italy in the past month, and 0.24% of them were also positive for the virus – 27 travelers. Italy currently has a weekly average of 67 cases per million people, 181 active cases per million people according to the ICL model and 95 according to IHME.

Also on Tuesday, the Knesset Law and Constitution Committee approved the government’s request to employ technological tools to monitor compliance with quarantine requirements.

Specifically, the authorities have been looking into a monitoring system that would allow the police to send an SMS or call the individual in quarantine and localize their phone.

However, according to the original legal framework approved by the full Knesset in the spring, the person should be given the choice to opt out of technological surveillance tools and choose to quarantine in a state-run hotel.

Since the government currently does not intend to offer this option, the committee approved the authorization to use electronic tools only until August 17, asking the government to update the relevant legislation as soon as possible.





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TikTok Is the Newest Inflight Entertainment Feature on American Airlines




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ABC 25 Local Lifestyles – Summer Travel Tips (08/03/2021)


McLean CO, Ky (WEHT)– August 25 will be the first day of school for McLean County Public Schools. Students were supposed to go back to school next Wednesday, but Superintendent Tommy Burrough says due to unforeseen construction issues at Calhoun Elementary School, that won’t be possible.

Over the summer, construction crews have been replacing the HVAC air system in Calhoun Elementary School. Burrough says due to the humidity these past couple of weeks, the glue under the tile in the some hallways and rooms have leaked through the cracks.



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Coronavirus & international travel: Is it worth It for students? | Focus


Coronavirus & international travel: Is it worth It for students?

Without a doubt, Coronavirus and the subsequent lockdown have greatly influenced all spheres of our lives from education to entertainment. But, one industry that was influenced the most is traveling.

In an attempt to stop the spreading of the deadly virus, most countries have locked their borders and announced strict lockdown terms. However, now, when we start recovering, traveling is getting accessible again, though not without certain complications.

So, is it now worth it to go abroad, especially if you are a student? In this article, we are going to assess the biggest challenges and benefits to find the answer. Let’s dive in!

The Challenges of International Travel for Students
To understand whether it is worth it or not, it is important to understand what are the biggest hurdles student tourists may face today.

Let’s look at the six biggest challenges you have to be prepared to:

Combining Studying and Traveling
First and foremost, it’s worth saying that the biggest challenge facing students during their tours abroad is the need to somehow combine it with their academic matters. This issue has been there long before Coronavirus and will likely stay for years ahead.

Luckily, the solution is simple. Today, you can easily find a reliable service by searching ‘pay to write my paper’ and entrust your papers to professional writers. This way you will save plenty of time and ensure a high grade with ease.

Safety
Probably one of the first things that should pop up in your mind when thinking about going abroad after the pandemic is whether it is even safe to do so. Of course, the governments of most countries encourage their citizens to leave their traveling plans for when it is completely safe.

Is it really that unsafe? Well, it might be. However, it is also worth mentioning that the countries that are struggling with the rising numbers of Covid-19 cases are typically closed for tourists. But, nevertheless, the risks are still there. So, the truth is that you do so at your own risk as it is impossible to predict whether you will be completely safe visiting a different country.

Limited Destinations
Another big challenge implied by the virus is the lack of options you now have for your getaways. While the world is still trying to recover after the peak of the pandemic, not all countries are ready to welcome tourists yet. That is, the number of destinations that are open right now is significantly lower compared to what we all have been used to.

The good news though is that many countries are gradually easing their restrictions. And, nevertheless, if your options are still limited, it might be as well a great chance to discover locations that you never even thought about.

Tests and Masks
Another unpleasant result of the global pandemic is the necessity to do tests before and after your travels, and the need to wear a mask literally everywhere you go. This can’t really be called a major drawback. After all, neither doing tests nor wearing masks can spoil your vacation. But, it can sure feel very unpleasant.

Self-Isolation
Depending on the destination you are traveling to, there is one more issue you may face – it is the necessity to go through it a 14-day self-isolation. The rules to self-isolation from one country to another, so this is definitely something you want to clarify before going abroad.

It is important to remember that a long self-isolation can affect your personal plans and, in some cases, may even have a negative impact on your budget. However, if you are prepared for it, you should do just fine.

Cost
Finally, the last and probably the most significant challenge of international travel for students is the cost. There is no need to sugarcoat it – traveling has always been rather expensive. So, even if we wouldn’t have Coronavirus, it would still remain one of the major challenges for students.

As for the cost after the pandemic, it didn’t change as much as you could imagine. Even now, when more and more destinations open to us, the cost of flights, accommodation and other related things remain pretty much the same as it used to be. Moreover, to attract tourists, many companies even offer discounts, which is definitely a good thing.

The Benefits of International Travel for Students
Although there are quite many hurdles, the benefits are also huge.

First of all, going on a trip after nearly two years of lockdowns and restrictions will sure feel like a breath of fresh air. Besides, given all the complications and limitations that are still there, the number of tourists even in the most popular locations is now significantly lower than ever. That is, now, you have a chance to visit your dream destinations without crowds of other tourists.

In addition to that, there are also many other benefits of international travel. To name a few, it helps you learn and discover new cultures. It also lets you make lots of new friends and have many great memories. And one more benefit that is believed to be especially important for young people is that going abroad actually enables you to get out of your comfort zone, which will have a positive effect on your personality, helping you grow, develop, and expand your horizons.

These by far are not all benefits waiting for you out there. Not without a reason traveling has been always considered to be vital for young people. So, if you look at it from this perspective, it becomes clear that it is well worth it, even despite all the hurdles.

Final Words
So, is it still worth it to travel overseas with all the issues and challenges implied by Covid-19?

Eventually, it all gets down to how you personally feel about it. To be frank, there are plenty of issues you might face if you go overseas. But, at the same time, there are also many big benefits that seem to overshadow all the drawbacks. So, the choice is yours!





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